Synonyms containing Dorothy

We've found 130 synonyms:

Over the Rainbow

Over the Rainbow

"Over the Rainbow" is a classic Academy Award-winning ballad, with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by E.Y. Harburg. It was written for the 1939 movie The Wizard of Oz, and was sung by actress Judy Garland in her starring role as Dorothy Gale. Over time, it would become Garland's signature song. The song has become one of the most enduring standards of the 20th century. About five minutes into the film, Dorothy sings the song after failing to get her aunt and uncle to listen to her relate an unpleasant incident involving her dog, Toto, and the town spinster, Miss Gulch. Dorothy's Aunt Em tells her to "find yourself a place where you won't get into any trouble." This prompts Dorothy to walk off by herself, musing to Toto, "'Some place where there isn't any trouble.' Do you suppose there is such a place, Toto? There must be. It's not a place you can get to by a boat, or a train. It's far, far away. Behind the moon, beyond the rain..." at which point she begins singing.

— Freebase

Silver Shoes

Silver Shoes

The Silver Shoes are the magical shoes that appear in L. Frank Baum's 1900 novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as heroine Dorothy Gale's transport home. They are originally owned by the Wicked Witch of the East but passed to Dorothy when her house lands on the Witch. At the end of the story, Dorothy uses the shoes to transport her back to her home in Kansas, but when she arrives at her destination finds the shoes had fallen off en route.

— Wikipedia

Dorothy Wainwright

Dorothy Wainwright

Dorothy Wainwright is a fictional character in the 1980s British sitcom, Yes, Prime Minister. She was portrayed by Deborah Norton. During the time that James Hacker served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Wainwright served as his Chief Political Advisor. She had already served his predecessor in a similar role. She continuously tries to foil Sir Humphrey Appleby's plans to deceive the Prime Minister, so Humphrey begins to hate her, calling her "that impossible woman" and "that Wainwright female". Whenever they met however, he would smile and address her as "dear lady." Sir Humphrey did not underestimate her. He tried to have her office moved as far away from the Prime Minister as possible — from next to the gents' loo, which Dorothy found convenient since she was able to listen in to cabinet ministers plotting against their colleagues whenever they answered a call of nature. She insisted on returning to next to the gents' loo and, when Sir Humphrey tried to block this, advised Hacker on how to "clip his wings" in order to get the Cabinet Secretary to be more cooperative and Hacker to assert some authority over him.When Sir Humphrey and Sir Frank Gordon, the Permanent Secretary to the Treasury, tried to trick the cabinet into approving a massive pay rise for the civil service, they submitted a massive report of several hundred pages in order to support their claim — and which the ministers were hardly likely to read through thoroughly. Dorothy read through it however and warned Hacker of their scheme. Although Gordon's attempt was blocked, Sir Humphrey did manage to persuade Hacker to approve what seemed to be a more sensible pay increase (but designed in such a way that it was the actual increase without appearing to be) and suggested that they keep it secret, even from political advisors.In the stage version of Yes Prime Minister (2010) a new special adviser appeared: Claire Sutton, played by Emily Joyce, who, with her bobbed hair and sharp clothing displayed some of the features of the youngish, high-flying women who had been part of the New Labour "inner circle" at Downing Street between 1997 and 2010. This character was retained in the ensuing TV revival (2013), in which she was played by Zoe Telford.

— Wikipedia

Doris

Doris

Doris is a "comedy opera" in three acts by Alfred Cellier, with a libretto by B. C. Stephenson. After the phenomenal success of Cellier and Stephenson's Dorothy, the pair were hoping for another big hit. Doris turned out to be only modestly successful. It opened at the Lyric Theatre in London on 20 April 1889 and ran for 202 performances. It starred Arthur Williams, Ben Davies, Alice Barnett, Hayden Coffin, Furneaux Cook and John Le Hay. The New York Times review stated: Another critic concluded, "The libretto of Doris is so feeble that I misdoubt even Cellier's music, the splendid mounting of the piece, and the interesting Elizabethan processions pulling it through. What judicious compression and unscrupulous 'gagging' may accomplish one cannot, of course, venture to prophesy. I understood that at the end of Dorothy's run very little if any of the original dialogue remained. It had been improved out of recognition. Still, both Dorothy and Falka rejoiced in plain straightforward stories everyone could understand. The difficulty is to make head or tail of Doris."

— Freebase

Dorothy Dixer

Dorothy Dixer

In Australian politics, a Dorothy Dixer is a rehearsed or planted question asked of a government Minister by a backbencher of his/her own political party during Parliamentary Question Time. The term is used in a mildly derogatory sense. Often, the question has been written by the Minister or his/her staff rather than by the questioner, and is used to give the Minister a chance to promote themselves or the work of the Government, or to criticise the opposition party's policies, to raise the profile of the backbench Member asking the question, or to consume the time available for questioning and thereby avoid tougher questions. It is a common and widely-accepted tactic during Question Time in the House of Representatives and the Senate. While it is not very common in the Australian context, it would be possible for a backbencher on the Government side of the house to ask a member of the Government a question without it being regarded as a Dorothy Dixer. Such a question would be one that the Minister was not aware of in advance, or that the Minister had not planted, or both. It is common for "Dorothy Dixers" to end in the question: "Is the Minister aware of any alternative policies?" This enables the responding Minister to launch into extended criticism of the Opposition and its policy on the question's subject matter, while still remaining technically relevant to the question as asked, as Standing orders require.

— Freebase

Dorothy Dix

Dorothy Dix

Dorothy Dix, was the pseudonym of U.S. journalist Elizabeth Meriwether Gilmer. As the forerunner of today's popular advice columnists, Dorothy Dix was America's highest paid and most widely read female journalist at the time of her death. Her advice on marriage was syndicated in newspapers around the world. With an estimated audience of 60 million readers, she became a popular and recognized figure on her travels abroad. Her name is the origin of the term "Dorothy Dixer", a widely-used phrase in Australia meaning a question from a member of Parliament to a minister, that enables the minister to make an announcement in the form of a reply.

— Freebase

Doll

Doll

A diminutive of the female given name Dorothy.

— Wiktionary

Dolly

Dolly

A diminutive of the female given name Dorothy, and later also of Dolores.

— Wiktionary

Dot

Dot

diminutive of the female given name Dorothy.

— Wiktionary

Wizard of Oz

Wizard of Oz

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, a 1900 book by L. Frank Baum, or any of its adaptations, about the journey of Dorothy through the magical Land of Oz in search of a way home.

— Wiktionary

Dodie

Dodie

A diminutive of the female given name Dorothy.

— Wiktionary

Tin Man

Tin Man

The Tin Woodsman, a metallic character in the fictional Land of Oz who travels with Dorothy, the Scarecrow and the Cowardly Lion to the Emerald City in search of a heart.

— Wiktionary

Dorothea

Dorothea

A female given name from Ancient Greek, a Latinate variant of Dorothy.

— Wiktionary

Dottie

Dottie

A diminutive of the female given name Dorothy, also spelled Dotty, and sometimes also used as a formal given name.

— Wiktionary

Dorothy Dandridge

Dorothy Dandridge

Dorothy Jean Dandridge (November 9, 1922 – September 8, 1965) was an American film and theatre actress, singer, and dancer. She is perhaps one of the most famous African-American actresses to have a successful Hollywood career and the first to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in the 1954 film Carmen Jones. Dandridge performed as a vocalist in venues such as the Cotton Club and the Apollo Theater. During her early career, she performed as a part of The Wonder Children, later The Dandridge Sisters, and appeared in a succession of films, usually in uncredited roles. In 1959, Dandridge was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Porgy and Bess. She is the subject of the 1999 HBO biographical film, Introducing Dorothy Dandridge. She has been recognized with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Dandridge was married and divorced twice, first to dancer Harold Nicholas (the father of her daughter, Harolyn Suzanne) and then to hotel owner Jack Denison. Dandridge died under mysterious circumstances at age 42.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym for "tolerable"?
  • A. constructive
  • B. adequate
  • C. passable
  • D. fair to middling