Synonyms containing aad wife

We've found 2,998 synonyms:

Urraca

Urraca

Urraca (also spelled Hurraca, Urracha and Hurracka in medieval Latin) is a female first name. In Spanish, the name means magpie, derived perhaps from Latin furax, meaning "thievish", in reference to the magpie's tendency to collect shiny items. The name may be of Basque origin, as suggested by onomastic analysis. Urraca (9th century), purported wife of García Íñiguez of Pamplona Urraca bint Qasi (fl. 917–929), wife of Fruela II of León Urraca Sánchez of Pamplona (10th century), wife of Ramiro II of León Urraca Fróilaz (fl. 969–978), wife of Aznar Purcelliz Urraca Garcés (died before 1008), wife of Fernán González of Castile and William II Sánchez of Gascony Urraca Fernández (died 1005/7), wife of Ordoño III of León, Ordoño IV of León and of Sancho II of Pamplona Urraca of Covarrubias (died 1038), abbess and daughter of García Fernández of Castile Urraca, apparently Gómez (died 1039), wife of Sancho García of Castile Urraca Sánchez (died 1041), wife of Sancho VI William of Gascony Urraca Sánchez (11th century), wife of Alfonso V of León Urraca of Zamora (1033/4–1101), daughter of King Ferdinand I of León. Urraca of León and Castile (Urraca the Reckless) (1082–1129), Queen of León and Castile, daughter of Alfonso VI, wife of Alfonso I of Aragon, mother of Alfonso VII Urraca of Castile, Queen of Navarre (Urraca the Asturian) (1132–1164), daughter of Alfonso VII of León and Castile, and queen consort of García Ramírez of Navarre Urraca of Portugal (1151–1188), daughter of Alfonso I of Portugal and wife of King Ferdinand II of León Urraca of Castile, Queen of Portugal (1186/1187–1220), daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Leonor of England

— Wikipedia

Wife

Wife

wīf, n. a woman: a married woman: the mistress of a house, a hostess—often in this sense 'goodwife.'—n. Wife′hood, the state of being a wife.—adjs. Wife′less, without a wife; Wife′-like, Wife′ly. [A.S. wíf; Ice. víf, Ger. weib; not conn. with weave.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sister-in-law

Sister-in-law

the sister of one's husband or wife; also, the wife of one's brother; sometimes, the wife of one's husband's or wife's brother

— Webster Dictionary

Uxorious

Uxorious

uk-sō′ri-us, adj. excessively or submissively fond of a wife.—adjs. Uxō′rial, pertaining to a wife; Uxō′ricidal, pertaining to uxoricide.—n. Uxō′ricide, one who kills his wife: the killing of a wife.—adv. Uxō′riously.—n. Uxō′riousness. [L. uxoriusuxor, a wife.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Jointure

Jointure

Jointure is, in law, a provision for a wife after the death of her husband. As defined by Sir Edward Coke, it is "a competent livelihood of freehold for the wife, of lands or tenements, to take effect presently in possession or profit after the death of her husband for the life of the wife at least, if she herself be not the cause of determination or forfeiture of it':. A jointure is of two kinds, legal and equitable. A legal jointure was first authorized by the Statute of Uses. Before this statute a husband had no legal seisin in such lands as were vested in another to his "use", but merely an equitable estate. Consequently it was usual to make settlements on marriage, the most general form being the settlement by deed of an estate to the use of the husband and wife for their lives in joint tenancy so that the whole would go to the survivor. Although, strictly speaking, a jointure is a joint estate limited to both husband and wife, in common acceptation the word extends also to a sole estate limited to the wife only. The requisites of a legal jointure are: ⁕the jointure must take effect immediately after the husband's death; ⁕it must be for the wife's life or for a greater estate, or be determinable by her own act;

— Freebase

DDD

DDD

A designation on prerecorded compact discs indicating a "full digital recording" (recorded, mixed and mastered in digital); compare AAD, ADD, DAD.

— Wiktionary

mu

mu

The correct answer to the classic trick question “Have you stopped beating your wife yet?”. Assuming that you have no wife or you have never beaten your wife, the answer “yes” is wrong because it implies that you used to beat your wife and then stopped, but “no” is worse because it suggests that you have one and are still beating her. According to various Discordians and Douglas Hofstadter the correct answer is usually “mu”, a Japanese word alleged to mean “Your question cannot be answered because it depends on incorrect assumptions”. Hackers tend to be sensitive to logical inadequacies in language, and many have adopted this suggestion with enthusiasm. The word ‘mu’ is actually from Chinese, meaning ‘nothing’; it is used in mainstream Japanese in that sense. In Chinese it can also mean “have not” (as in “I have not done it”), or “lack of”, which may or may not be a definite, complete 'nothing'). Native speakers of Japanese do not recognize the Discordian question-denying use, which almost certainly derives from overgeneralization of the answer in the following well-known Rinzai Zen koan: A monk asked Joshu, “Does a dog have the Buddha nature?” Joshu retorted, “Mu!” See also has the X nature, Some AI Koans, and Douglas Hofstadter's Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid (pointer in the Bibliography in Appendix C.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

sororate marriage

sororate marriage

A marriage in which a husband engages in marriage or sexual relations with the sister of his wife, usually after the death of his wife, or once his wife has proven infertile.

— Wiktionary

Uxorial

Uxorial

dotingly fond of, or servilely submissive to, a wife; uxorious; also, becoming a wife; pertaining to a wife

— Webster Dictionary

Grimace

Grimace

a distortion of the countenance, whether habitual, from affectation, or momentary aad occasional, to express some feeling, as contempt, disapprobation, complacency, etc.; a smirk; a made-up face

— Webster Dictionary

Hen

Hen

hen, n. the female of any bird, esp. of the domestic fowl.—ns. Hen′bane, a coarse annual or biennial herb of the nightshade family, poisonous, esp. to domestic fowls; Hen′coop, a coop or large cage for domestic fowls; Hen′-driv′er, Hen′-harr′ier, a species of falcon, the common harrier.—adj. Hen′-heart′ed, timid as a hen: cowardly.—ns. Hen′-house, a house, coop, or shelter for fowls; Hen′-huss′y, a man who meddles with women's affairs; Hen′-mould, a black, spongy soil; Hen′nery, a place where fowls are kept.—adj. Hen′ny, like a hen, feathered.—v.t. Hen′peck, of a wife, to domineer over her husband.—n. the subjection of a husband to his wife.—adj. Hen′pecked, weakly subject to his wife.—ns. Henpeck′ery, the state of being henpecked; Hen′-roost, a place where poultry roost at night; Hen′wife, Hen′-wom′an, a woman who has the charge of poultry. [A.S. hennhana, a cock; Ger. hahn, fem. henne.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gerberga

Gerberga

Gerberga or Gerberge was the name of several queens and noblewomen among the Franks. Gerberga, the wife and Queen consort of Carloman I, King of the Franks (751 – 791) Gerberge (born circa 854), daughter of Pepin, Count of Vermandois Geva, wife of Dirk I, Count of Holland (born c.870), name also given as Gerberga Gerberga, wife of Fulk II, Count of Anjou (c. 905 – 960) Gerberga of Saxony (c. 913 – 984), the wife and Queen consort of Louis IV of France, mother of Gerberga of Lorraine Gerberge of Lorraine (c. 935 – 978), daughter of Gerberga of Saxony, wife of Adalbert I, Count of Vermandois Gerberga of Burgundy (965 – 1016), wife of Herman II, Duke of Swabia Gerberge, daughter of Rotbold II, Count of Provence (d.1008) Gerberga of Lower Lorraine (c.980 – 1018), daughter of Charles, Duke of Lower Lorraine, granddaughter of Gerberga of Saxony, niece of Gerberga of Lorraine, wife of Lambert I, Count of Louvain. Ermesinda of Bigorre (1015 – 1049) born Gerberga. Gerberga, Countess of Provence (c. 1060 – 1115), succeeded by her daughter Douce of Provence (Dolça de Gévaudaun) and son-in-law Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona.

— Wikipedia

Sister-in-law

Sister-in-law

A sister-in-law is the sister of one's spouse, the wife of one's sibling, or sometimes the wife of one's spouse's sibling. Relative to a woman, the latter case is occasionally called a 'co-sister-in-law', as they are each the sister-in-law of the others husband. For example, if Jacob and Esau are brothers, Leah being Jacob's wife, and Adah being Esau's wife, then Adah is Jacob's sister-in-law, Leah is Esau's sister-in-law, and Adah and Leah are co-sisters-in-law to one another. Here's another example: If Bill Weasley and Ginny Weasley are brother and sister, Fleur Delacour being Bill's wife and Harry Potter being Ginny's husband, then Harry is Bill's brother-in-law, Fleur is Ginny's sister-in-law and Harry and Fleur are brother-in-law and sister-in-law to each other.

— Freebase

Morta

Morta

Morta was the Grand Duchess of Lithuania and later Queen of Lithuania. There is very little known about her life; even her pre-Christianised name is unknown. The only clue into her origin or birthplace is a short mention in the comments following the treaty signed in 1219 between the Lithuanian dukes and Galicia–Volhynia. It says that Mindaugas killed many members of the Bulaičiai family, including Vismantas whose wife Mindaugas took for himself. It is generally assumed that Morta was Vismantas' wife. Edvardas Gudavičius, a modern Lithuanian historian, based on toponyms, determined that the Bulaičiai family most likely came from the Šiauliai region. Based on this evidence and hypotheses, residents of Šiauliai call the city home of Morta. It is known that Mindaugas had more than one wife. Probably, Morta was his second wife as Vaišvilkas, eldest son of Mindaugas, was already a mature man active in international politics when Morta's sons were still young and dependent on the parents. After her death, Mindaugas married her sister, the wife of Daumantas. It is also known that two of her sons were killed together with Mindaugas in 1263.

— Freebase

Waldrada

Waldrada

Waldrada (also Vuldetrada) (531–572), widow (firstly) of Theudebald, King of Austrasia (ruled 548–555), reputed mistress (secondly) of Chlothar I, King of the Franks (ruled until 561), was the daughter of Wacho, King of the Lombards (ruled ca. 510–539) and his second wife called Austrigusa or Ostrogotha, a Gepid. The Origo Gentis Langobardorum names "Wisigarda…secundæ Walderada" as the two daughters of Wacho and his second wife, specifying that Waldrada married "Scusuald regis Francorum" and later "Garipald". The Historia Langobardorum names "Waldrada" as Wacho's second daughter by his second wife, specifying that she married "Chusubald rex Francorum". Paulus Diaconus names "Wisigarda…[et] secunda Walderada" as the two daughters of King Wacho & his second wife, specifying that Walderada married "Cusupald alio regi Francorum" and later "Garipald". Gregory of Tours names Vuldetrada as the wife of King Theodebald. Herimannus names "Wanderadam" wife of "Theodpaldus rex Francorum" when recording her second marriage to "Lotharius rex patris eius Theodeberti patruus".According to Gregory of Tours, King Clotaire "began to have intercourse" with the widow of King Theodebald, before "the bishops complained and he handed her over to Garivald Duke of Bavaria", which apparently implies that King Clotaire did not marry Waldrada.

— Wikipedia

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A synonym of "dry"
  • A. juiceless
  • B. sodden
  • C. drippy
  • D. steamy