Synonyms containing alarm bells

We've found 667 synonyms:

Alarm device

Alarm device

An alarm device or system of alarm devices gives an audible, visual or other form of alarm signal about a problem or condition. Alarm devices are often outfitted with a siren. Alarm devices include: ⁕burglar alarms, designed to warn of burglaries; this is often a silent alarm: the police or guards are warned without indication to the burglar, which increases the chances of catching him or her. ⁕alarm clocks can produce an alarm at a given time ⁕distributed control systems, found in nuclear power plants, refineries and chemical facilities also generate alarms to direct the operator's attention to an important event that he or she needs to address. ⁕alarms in an operation and maintenance monitoring system, which informs the bad working state of the system under monitoring. ⁕first-out alarm ⁕safety alarms, which go off if a dangerous condition occurs. Common public safety alarms include: ⁕civil defense siren also known as tornado sirens or air raid sirens ⁕fire alarm systems ⁕fire alarm notification appliance ⁕"Multiple-alarm fire", a locally-specific measure of the severity of a fire and the fire-department reaction required. ⁕smoke detector ⁕car alarmsautodialer alarm, also known as community alarmpersonal alarmtocsins – a historical method of raising an alarm

— Freebase

Bell

Bell

A bell is a simple sound-making device. The bell is a percussion instrument and an idiophone. Its form is usually a hollow, cup-shaped acoustic resonator, which vibrates upon being struck. The striking implement can be a tongue suspended within the bell, known as a clapper, a separate mallet or hammer, or in small bells a small loose sphere enclosed within the body of the bell. Bells are usually made of cast metal, but small bells can also be made from ceramic or glass. Bells range in size from tiny dress accessories to church bells 5 meters tall, weighing many tons. Historically, bells were associated with religious rituals, and before mass communication were widely used to call communities together for both religious and secular events. Later bells were made to commemorate important events or people and have been associated with the concepts of peace and freedom. The study of bells is called campanology. A set of bells, hung in a circle for change ringing, is known as a ring of bells or peal of bells. A set 23 of bells spanning at least two octaves is a carillon.

— Freebase

Notifier

Notifier

Notifier or Notifier by Honeywell is a manufacturer of engineered fire alarm systems with over 500 distributors worldwide, and regional support operations on every continent. Notifier is headquartered in Northford, Connecticut and is a division of the Honeywell Life Safety Group. Notifier has been manufacturing fire alarm systems for over 50 years, including conventional and intelligent fire alarm control panels, fire alarm networks, fire and security integration systems, mass notification systems, and fire alarm accessories. Along with fire alarm control panels, Notifier has PC-based touchscreen workstations that monitor and control the fire alarm system from a central location. Notifier has a complete integrated emergency communication systems solution for a wide variety of facility types including military bases, hospitals, university campuses, industrial, manufacturing, hotels and nursing homes. Notifier offers a complete line of fire alarm peripheral devices, such as smoke detectors, heat detectors, manual pull stations, gas detectors, and notification appliances. These products connect to and interface with the Notifier fire alarm control panel to form fire alarm systems. Notifier is one of the largest life safety and fire alarm system manufacturers in the world.

— Freebase

Alarm clock

Alarm clock

An alarm clock is a clock that is designed to wake a person at a specific time. The primary use of these clocks is to awaken people from their night's sleep or short naps; they are sometimes used for other reminders as well. Some use sound, some use light, and some use sensors to identify when a person is in a light stage of sleep, in order to avoid waking someone when they're deeply asleep, which causes tiredness, even if the person has had adequate sleep. To stop the sound or light, a button or handle on the clock is pressed; but most clocks automatically stop the alarm if left unattended long enough. A classic analog alarm clock has an extra hand or inset dial that is used to specify the time at which to activate the alarm. Traditional mechanical alarm clocks have one or two bells that ring by means of a mainspring that drives a gear that propels a hammer back and forth between the two bells or between the interior sides of a single bell. In some models, the back encasement of the clock itself acts as the bell. In an electric bell-style alarm clock, the bell is rung by an electromagnetic circuit and armature that turns the circuit on and off repeatedly. Digital alarm clocks can make other noises. Simple battery-powered alarm clocks make a loud buzzing or beeping sound to wake a sleeper, while novelty alarm clocks can speak, laugh, sing, or play sounds from nature.

— Freebase

Bell

Bell

bel, n. a hollow vessel of metal, which gives forth a ringing sound when struck by the tongue or clapper suspended inside—as in church-bell, hand-bell, alarm-bell, night-bell, marriage-bell, &c.: a corolla shaped like a bell: the body of a Corinthian or composite capital, without the surrounding foliage: anything bell-shaped, as in diving-bell, bell-glass, the bell or outward-turned orifice of a trumpet, &c.: a bell rung to tell the hour: (naut.) the bell struck on shipboard every half-hour as many times as there are half-hours of the watch elapsed—'two bells,' 'three bells,' &c., meaning that there are two or three half-hours past; the watch of four hours is eight bells.—v.t. to furnish with a bell, esp. in To bell the cat, to take the leading part in any hazardous movement, from the ancient fable of the mice who proposed to hang a warning bell round the cat's neck.—ns. Bell′cote (archit.), an ornamental Bell-crank. structure made to contain one or two bells, and often crowned by a small spire; Bell′-crank, a rectangular lever in the form of a crank, used for changing the direction of bell-wires; Bell′-found′er, one who founds or casts bells; Bell′-glass, a bell-shaped glass for sheltering flowers; Bell′-hang′er, one who hangs and repairs bells; Bell′man, one who rings a bell, esp. on the streets, before making public announcements: a town-crier; Bell′-met′al, the metal of which bells are made—an alloy of copper and tin; Bell′-punch, a hand-punch containing a signal-bell, used for punching a hole in a ticket in order to keep a record of the number of fares taken; Bell′-ring′er, one whose business it is to ring a bell on stated occasions: a performer with musical hand-bells; Bell′-rope, the rope by which a bell is rung.—adj. Bell′-shaped.—ns. Bell′-tow′er, a tower built to contain one or more bells, a campanile; Bell′-tur′ret, a turret containing a bell-chamber, usually crowned with a spire; Bell′-weth′er, the leading sheep of a flock, on whose neck a bell is hung: (fig.) any loud, turbulent fellow, esp. the leader of a mob.—Bell, book, and candle, a phrase popularly used in reference to a form of excommunication ending with the words, 'Do to [shut] the book, quench the candle, ring the bell.'—To bear or carry off the bell, to have or to gain the first place. [A.S. belle; cog. with Dut. bel.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fire alarm system

Fire alarm system

A fire alarm system has a number of devices working together to detect and warn people through visual and audio appliances when smoke, fire, carbon monoxide or other emergencies are present. These alarms may be activated automatically from smoke detectors, and heat detectors or may also be activated via manual fire alarm activation devices such as manual call points or pull stations. Alarms can be either motorized bells or wall mountable sounders or horns. They can also be [(speaker strobes]) which sound an alarm, followed by a voice evacuation message which warns people inside the building not to use the elevators. Fire alarm sounders can be set to certain frequencies and different tones including low, medium and high, depending on the country and manufacturer of the device. Most fire alarm systems in Europe sound like a siren with alternating frequencies. Fire alarm electronic devices are known as horns in the United States and Canada, and can be either continuous or set to different codes. Fire alarm warning devices can also be set to different volume levels.

— Wikipedia

Bellfounding

Bellfounding

Bellfounding is the casting of bells in a foundry for use in churches, clocks, and public buildings. The process in East Asia dates to about 2000 BC and in Europe dates to the 4th or 5th century. In early times, when a town produced a bell it was a momentous occasion in which the whole community would participate. Archaeological excavations of churchyards in Britain have revealed furnaces, which suggests that bells were often cast on site in pits dug in the building grounds. In some instances bells were cast directly in the church. Before the nineteenth century, bellfounders tended to be itinerant, travelling from church to church to cast bells on site. More centralized foundries were established on foundation of railways. There are however examples of foundries producing bells prior to this, such as the Whitechapel Bell Foundry. Bells intended to be rung are usually made by casting bell metal of a size appropriate for the pitch the bell is intended to produce. Fine tuning of metal bells is achieved on a lathe where a precise amount of material is removed from the inside of the bell in order to produce a true tone with correct harmonics. Bells are used often to play a chime sequence and so must be well tuned in order to produce a correct scale of musical notes.

— Freebase

Campanology

Campanology

Campanology is the study of bells. It encompasses the technology of bells — how they are cast, tuned and sounded — as well as the history, methods, and traditions of bell-ringing as an art. It is common to collect together a set of tuned bells and treat the whole as one musical instrument. Such collections — such as a Flemish carillon, a Russian zvon, or an English "ring of bells" used for change ringing — have their own practices and challenges; and campanology is likewise the study of perfecting such instruments and composing and performing music for them. In this sense, however, the word "campanology" is most often used in reference to relatively large bells, often hung in a tower. It is not usually applied to assemblages of smaller bells, such as a glockenspiel, a collection of tubular bells, or an Indonesian gamelan.

— Freebase

Panic button

Panic button

A panic alarm is an electronic device designed to assist in alerting somebody in emergency situations where a threat to persons or property exists. A panic alarm is frequently but not always controlled by a concealed panic alarm button. These buttons can be connected to a monitoring center or locally via a silent alarm or an audible bell/siren. The alarm can be used to request emergency assistance from local security, police or emergency services. Some systems can also activate closed-circuit television to record or assess the event. Many panic alarm buttons lock on when pressed, and require a key to reset them.

— Freebase

Action Stations

Action Stations

Action Stations is the general signal to the personnel of a warship that combat with a hostile attacker is imminent or deemed probable. The alarm is also used as a preventative measure: for example, just before dawn when cruising in hostile waters and the possibility of air or submarine attack is deemed particularly high, although no active contacts exist. The term is also used in Royal Navy installations and bases, as well as Royal Air Force airbases and installations. Action Stations is equivalent to the United States Navy's 'General Quarters', and replaces the 'beat to quarters' instruction common during the age of sail. Action Stations! Action Stations! All hands to action stations. Action surface starboard. Assume condition Yankee. Close all red openings. Action Stations! Action Stations! Aboard ship, Action Stations is indicated by an alarm signal issued over the ship's bells or horns. This is usually followed by an announcement giving specific information, then a repeat of the alarm signal, after which the alarm is silenced. The alarm is distinguished from a ship’s readiness state and Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear condition, which refers to the manning of equipment and the closing of openings respectively. When sounded, all personnel immediately stow any non-essential gear, take their life belts and action kit, and immediately report to their pre-assigned post or station. As personnel report to their stations, all weapons systems are readied to fire on command, the damage control centre is manned, and watertight doors are shut or sentries placed on those that must remain open. On aircraft carriers, the flight deck is made ready, any alert craft are prepared for launch, fuel lines are purged, and hangars secured. On ships with CBRN citadels, these are secured against the outside atmosphere and a positive pressure established.

— Freebase

Sonnerie

Sonnerie

Sonnerie is French for "making sound" or "ring". The term generally applies to bell towers or bells in mechanical clocks or wristwatches, but can equally be used, for example, for the sound produced by a telephone. Sonnerie watches are revered by connoisseurs for chiming the time on tiny gongs on the hour and the quarter "in passing", and require highly skilled watchmakers as they "cannot be made satisfactorily through purely industrial means." When "Sonnerie" is used as the name of a musical composition, it bears connotations of: ⁕Sounds produced by bell towers, for example Marin Marais' Sonnerie de Ste-Geneviève du Mont-de-Paris, Carillon from Bizet's L'Arlésienne or Cole Porter's I Happen to Like New York - all three of which rely on a repeated three-note figure to convey the peal of church bells, funeral bells or ship bells. ⁕Sounds produced by the bells of alarm clocks or trumpets sounding a réveil, for example Erik Satie's Sonnerie pour réveiller le bon gros Roi des Singes ⁕Outdoor music, for example performed by horns before a hunt, or a serenade performed in honour of a special person,...

— Freebase

Peal

Peal

In campanology, a peal is the name given to a specific type of performance of change ringing. The precise definition of a peal has changed considerably over the years. Currently, for a performance to be recognised as a peal by the Central Council for Church Bell Ringers it must consist of at least 5,040 changes on seven working bells, or a minimum of 5,000 on higher numbers of bells, meet a number of other criteria, and be published in The Ringing World. Originally a peal referred to a set sequence of changes of any length, now more often referred to as a touch. The original meaning is still in use today in call-change ringing. The most famous and frequently rung call change peal, associated with the Devon Association of ringers, is named 60 on 3rds. Related to this meaning is the practice of raising or lowering in peal, that is making the bells ready for change ringing by gradually increasing their swing until each bell is turning through a full circle, and then once ringing has finished returning them to their safe resting position by gradually reducing the amount of swing. A set of bells is sometimes called a peal of bells, but ringers usually prefer the name a ring of bells.

— Freebase

Tubular Bells

Tubular Bells

Tubular Bells is the debut record album of English musician Mike Oldfield, recorded when he was 19 and released in 1973. It was the first album released by Virgin Records and an early cornerstone of the company's success. Vivian Stanshall provided the voice of the "Master of Ceremonies" who reads off the list of instruments at the end of the first movement. The opening piano solo was used as a soundtrack to the enormously successful William Friedkin film The Exorcist and gained considerable airplay because of this. The piece was later orchestrated by David Bedford for The Orchestral Tubular Bells version and it had three sequels in the 1990s, Tubular Bells II, Tubular Bells III and The Millennium Bell. Finally, the album was fully re-recorded as Tubular Bells 2003 at its 30th anniversary in 2003. A newly mastered and mixed re-issue of the original album appeared in June 2009 on Mercury Records, with bonus material. For the opening ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics Oldfield rearranged segments from Tubular Bells for a segment about the National Health Service. This rendition appears on the soundtrack album Isles of Wonder and is included on the official BBC DVD release.

— Freebase

Jingle bell

Jingle bell

A jingle bell or sleigh bell is a type of bell which produces a distinctive 'jingle' sound, especially in large numbers. They find use in many areas as a percussion instrument, including the classic sleigh bell sound and morris dancing. They are typically used as a cheaper alternative to small 'classic' bells. The simplest jingle bells are produced from a single piece of sheet metal bent into a roughly spherical shape to contain a small ball bearing or short piece of metal rod. This method of production results in the classic two- or four-leaved shape. Two halves may also be crimped together, resulting in a ridge around the middle. A glass marble may also be used as the ringer on larger bells. Jingle bells are commonly used on Christmas decorations or as Christmas ornaments of themselves, or hung around the neck like a necklace. They can also be strung onto a heavy wire and bent into a wreath shape, usually with a metal bow. Rather than the cross-shaped opening in the bottom, other designs may by cut into the bell, such as a snowflake. Small designs like stars may also be cut into the upper part of the bell. "Jingle Bells" is possibly the best-known Christmas song. Like many Christmas decorations, jingle bells are also made in versions for other holidays, such as a jack-o'-lantern for Halloween.

— Freebase

Fire station

Fire station

A fire station is a structure or other area set aside for storage of firefighting apparatus such as fire engines and related vehicles, personal protective equipment, fire hoses and other specialized equipment. It may also have dormitory living facilities and work areas for the use of fire fighters. Living areas are sometimes arranged above the garage bays where personnel without specific station duties during the night shift are allowed to sleep unless a dispatch is called. In that situation, firefighters may have special means to allow entry to the ground floor quickly when a call for help is received, such as sliding down a brass pole called a fireman's pole. This arrangement also allows for a raised area to hang hoses to dry to prevent damage. In a single story station, a tower-like structure is sometimes used for hose hanging. An occupied station will usually have a station alarm system for receiving and annunciating an alarm, and indications of where and what caused the alarm. However, sometimes the only "alarm" is a telephone that is rung in case of emergency. In a volunteer fire department where volunteers do not staff the station, the firefighters may be summoned to the fire station by siren, radio or pagers, making a station alarm system superfluous.

— Freebase

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