Synonyms containing appomattox river

We've found 12,964 synonyms:

Appomattox Court House

Appomattox Court House

The Appomattox Courthouse is the current courthouse in Appomattox, Virginia built in 1892. It is located in the middle of the state about three miles northwest of the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, once known as Clover Hill - home of the original Old Appomattox Court House. The "new" Appomattox Courthouse is near the Appomattox Station and where the regional county government is located. Before the Civil War, the railroad bypassed Clover Hill, now known as the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park. As a result the population of Clover Hill, where the Old Appomattox Courthouse once stood, never grew much over 150 while Appomattox town grew to the thousands. When the courthouse at the village of Clover Hill burned for the second time in 1892, it was not rebuilt and a new courthouse was built in West Appomattox. That sealed the fate of the village of Clover Hill. The county seat was formally moved to the town of West Appomattox in 1894 and the word "West" was dropped in time making the name of the town just Appomattox, Virginia. There is a marker at the site of the "new" Appomattox Court House explaining the difference between the "new" and "old" court houses.

— Freebase

River

River

riv′ėr, n. a large running stream of water.—adj. Riv′erain, riparian.—ns. Riv′er-bank, the bank of a river; Riv′er-bās′in, the whole region drained by a river and its affluents; Riv′er-bed, the channel in which a river flows; Riv′er-birch, the red birch; Riv′er-bott′om, the alluvial land along the margin of a river; Riv′er-carp, the common carp; Riv′er-chub, the horny-head or jerker; Riv′er-course, the bed of a river; Riv′er-crab, a fresh-water crab; Riv′er-craft, small vessels which ply on rivers; Riv′er-cray′fish, a crayfish proper; Riv′er-dol′phin, a Gangetic dolphin; Riv′er-drag′on (Milt.), a crocodile; Riv′er-duck, a fresh-water duck; Riv′eret, Riv′erling, a small river; Riv′er-flat, alluvial land along a river; Riv′er-god, the tutelary deity of a river; Riv′er-head, the spring of a river; Riv′er-hog, the capybara; Riv′er-horse, the hippopotamus.—adj. Riv′erine, pertaining to, or resembling, a river.—ns. Riv′er-jack, the common water-snake of Europe; Riv′er-man, one who makes his livelihood by dragging the river for sunken goods; River-muss′el, a fresh-water mussel; Riv′er-ott′er, the common European otter; Riv′er-perch, a Californian surf-fish; Riv′er-pie, the water-ousel; Riv′er-shore, the shore or bank of a river; Riv′er-side, the bank of a river; Riv′er-smelt, the gudgeon; Riv′er-snail, a pond snail; Riv′er-swall′ow, the sand-martin; Riv′er-tide, the tide from the sea rising or ebbing in a river; Riv′er-tor′toise, a soft-shelled turtle; Riv′er-wall, a wall made to confine the waters of a river within definite bounds.—adj. Riv′ery, pertaining to rivers, like rivers. [Fr. rivière (It. riviera, shore, river)—Low L. riparia, a shore district—L. ripa, a bank.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Appomattox

Appomattox

Appomattox is a town in Appomattox County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,043 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Appomattox County. Appomattox is part of the Lynchburg Metropolitan Statistical Area.

— Freebase

Ocean Renewable Power Company

Ocean Renewable Power Company

Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC generates electricity from tidal energy. The company develops technologies and projects that use river and ocean energy to produce electricity to power homes and businesses primarily in North America. It installs turbine generator units in groups to form complete power systems that convert river and ocean energy into grid-compatible power. The company offers RivGen power system, which generates electricity at small river sites particularly in remote communities with no centralized power grid; TidGen Power System for shallow tidal current applications; and OCGen power system for deeper tidal and ocean current applications. It also offers its technology to river and ocean energy projects, including grid-connected public and municipal electric utilities close to tidal or ocean current resources; remote coastal, island, and interior communities that are not grid-connected; independent developers of river, tidal, and ocean current energy projects; and military facilities near river, tidal, or ocean current resources. The company was founded in 2004 and is based in Portland, Maine.

— CrunchBase

Quequechan River

Quequechan River

The Quequechan River is a river in Fall River, Massachusetts, that flows in a northwesterly direction from the northwest corner of the South Watuppa Pond through the heart of the city of Fall River and into the end of the Taunton River at Mount Hope Bay at Heritage State Park/Battleship Cove. The word Quequechan means "Falling River" or "Leaping/Falling Waters" in Wampanoag, hence the city's name.The river is 2.7 miles (4.3 km) and is mostly placid and stagnant in certain places, until it nears downtown Fall River near City Hall, where a quickly declining grade causes it to turn rapid down the hill into Mount Hope Bay/Taunton River. From 1813, with the establishment of the Fall River Manufactory, the river enabled Fall River to establish itself as a leading textile center during the early 19th century. It originally contained a series of eight small waterfalls in a narrow stream between what is now South Main Street and the tidal Taunton River. During the first half of the 19th century, the "Fall River" was nearly completely covered by textile mills. The upper portion of the river, east of Pleasant Street, was dammed to provide additional water power and storage for the mills.Between 1913 and 1914, the city of Fall River put together the Quequechan River Report published in 1915, to look into the problems the river was presented with. During the hot summer months, the water flowed very low and slowly and the water quality was becoming questionable. Chemical reactions were occurring occasionally on the river's edge from industrial mill wastes combined with hot water discharge, human wastes and other wastes (a dump was located on the river), causing further sanitary health concerns, and interest in the river in general.During the 1960s, Interstate 195 was constructed through the city along the length of the Quequechan River. The portion west of Plymouth Avenue was routed underground through a series of box culverts, while much of the eastern section "mill pond" was filled in for the highway embankment including the start of the Quequechan River being filled in for Exit 2 on Route 24, and portions of Route 24 and 195 built directly on the Quequechan River resulting in a change in the water flow, fish and wildlife over the years. There is a bike path on the abandoned railroad that parallels Interstate 195 directly over the Quequechan, and plans to expose the falls where they were downtown are often discussed.

— Wikipedia

Appomattox River

Appomattox River

The Appomattox River is a tributary of the James River, approximately 157 miles long, in central and eastern Virginia in the United States, named for the Appomattocs Indian tribe who lived along its lower banks in the 17th century. It drains a cotton and tobacco-growing region of the Piedmont and coastal plain southwest of Richmond. The English colonists in Virginia at first tried to rename the Appomattox as the "Bristoll River", however this name did not catch on, while the native one did. There are numerous historical spelling variants, such as Apamatuck, Apamutiky, Appamattuck, Appomattake, and Apumetecs, among others.

— Freebase

Detroit River

Detroit River

The Detroit River is a 24-nautical-mile-long river in the Great Lakes system. The name comes from the French Rivière du Détroit, which translates literally as "River of the Strait". The Detroit River has served an important role in the history of Detroit and is one of the busiest waterways in the world. The river travels south from Lake St. Clair to Lake Erie, and the whole river carries the international border between Canada and the United States. The river divides the major metropolitan areas of Detroit, Michigan, and Windsor, Ontario — an area referred to as Detroit–Windsor. The two are connected by the Ambassador Bridge and the Detroit–Windsor Tunnel. The river serves as an important transportation route connecting Lake Michigan, Huron, and Superior to the St. Lawrence Seaway and Erie Canal. When Detroit underwent rapid industrialization at the turn of the 20th century, the Detroit River became notoriously polluted and toxic. In recent years, however, the ecological importance of the river has warranted a vast restoration effort, and the river today has a wide variety of economical and recreational uses. There are numerous islands in the Detroit River, and much of the lower portion of the river is incorporated into the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge. The portion of the river in the city of Detroit has been organized into the Detroit International Riverfront and the William G. Milliken State Park and Harbor. The Detroit River is designated an American Heritage River and a Canadian Heritage River — the only river to have this dual designation.

— Freebase

Petersburg

Petersburg

Petersburg is an independent city in Virginia, United States, located on the Appomattox River and 23 miles south of the state capital of Richmond. The city's population was 32,420 as of 2010. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the City of Petersburg with Dinwiddie County for statistical purposes. The city's unique industrial past and its location as a transportation hub combined to create wealth for Virginia and the region. The location on the Appomattox River at the fall line early in the history in the Colony of Virginia caused Petersburg to become a strategic place for transportation and commercial activities, as well as the site of Fort Henry. As railroads emerged beginning in the 1830s, it became a major transfer point for both north-south and east-west competitors. The Petersburg Railroad was one of the earliest predecessors of the modern-day CSX Transportation system. Several of the earliest predecessors of the area's other major Class 1 railroad, Norfolk Southern, also met at Petersburg. Both CSX and NS rail systems maintain transportation centers at Petersburg.

— Freebase

Olifants Water Management Area

Olifants Water Management Area

Olifants WMA, or Olifants Water Management Area, Includes the following major rivers: the Elands River, Wilge River, Steelpoort River and Olifants River, and covers the following Dams: ⁕Blyderivierpoort Dam - Blyde River ⁕Bronkhorstspruit Dam - Bronkhorstspruit River ⁕Buffelskloof Dam - Waterval River ⁕Flag Boshielo Dam - Olifants River ⁕Klaserie Dam - Klaserie River ⁕Loskop Dam - Olifants River ⁕Middelburg Dam - Little Olifants River ⁕Ohrigstad Dam - Ohrigstad River ⁕Rhenosterkop Dam - Elands River ⁕Rust de Winter Dam - Elands River ⁕Tonteldoos Dam - Tonteldoos River ⁕Tours Dam - Ngwabitsi River ⁕Vlugkraal Dam - Vlugkraal River ⁕Witbank Dam - Olifants River

— Freebase

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant was the 18th president of the United States following his success as military commander in the American Civil War. Under Grant, the Union Army defeated the Confederate military; the war, and secession, ended with the surrender of Robert E. Lee's army at Appomattox Court House. As president, Grant led the Radical Republicans in their effort to eliminate vestiges of Confederate nationalism and slavery, protect African American citizenship, and defeat the Ku Klux Klan. In foreign policy, Grant sought to increase American trade and influence, while remaining at peace with the world. Although his Republican Party split in 1872 as reformers denounced him, Grant was easily reelected. During his second term the country's economy was devastated by the Panic of 1873, while investigations exposed corruption scandals in the administration. The conservative white Southerners regained control of Southern state governments and Democrats took control of the federal House of Representatives. By the time Grant left the White House in 1877, his Reconstruction policies were being undone. A career soldier, Grant graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point and served in the Mexican–American War. When the Civil War began in 1861, he rejoined the Union army. In 1862, Grant was promoted to major general and took control of Kentucky and most of Tennessee. He then led Union forces to victory after initial setbacks in the Battle of Shiloh, earning a reputation as an aggressive commander. In July 1863, Grant defeated Confederate armies and seized Vicksburg, giving the Union control of the Mississippi River and dividing the Confederacy in two. After the Battle of Chattanooga in late 1863, President Abraham Lincoln promoted Grant to lieutenant general and commander of all of the Union armies. As commander, Grant confronted Robert E. Lee in a series of bloody battles in 1864, which ended with Grant trapping Lee at Petersburg, Virginia. During the siege, Grant coordinated a series of devastating campaigns launched by generals William Tecumseh Sherman, Philip Sheridan, and George Henry Thomas in other theaters. Finally breaking through Lee's trenches, the Union Army captured Richmond in April 1865. Lee surrendered his depleted forces to Grant at Appomattox as the Confederacy collapsed. Most historians have hailed Grant's military genius, despite losses of men.

— Freebase

New River

New River

The New River, part of the Ohio River watershed, is a tributary of the Kanawha River about 320 mi long. The river flows through the U.S. states of North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. Much of the river's course through West Virginia is designated as the New River Gorge National River, and the New River is one of the nation's American Heritage Rivers. It was named the New River because it was not known to early Atlantic Coast explorers. Despite its name, the New River is the third-oldest river in the world geologically, and the only nontidal river that crosses the Appalachian Mountains. This ancient river begins in the mountains of North Carolina near the Tennessee state line, flows generally northwestward across the Blue Ridge Mountains, Great Appalachian Valley, Ridge and Valley Province, and the Allegheny Front in western Virginia and West Virginia, then cuts through the Appalachian Plateau to meet the Gauley River and become the Kanawha River in south-central West Virginia. The Kanawha then flows to the Gulf of Mexico via the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. Much of the river's course is lined with steep cliffs and rock outcrops, particularly in its gorge in West Virginia.

— Freebase

Chandler

Chandler

A river. A river in Alaska, United States; running 201 km from Chandler Lake in Gates of the Arctic National Park into the Colville 27 km northeast of Umiat. A river in New South Wales, Australia; running 110 km from the Great Dividing Range near Lyndhurst into the Macleay at Cunnawara National Park. A river in Maine, United States; running 39 km from Cottontail Hill in Centerville into the Englishman Bay near Jonesboro.

— Wiktionary

Yazoo River

Yazoo River

The Yazoo River is a river in the U.S. state of Mississippi. The Yazoo River was named by French explorer La Salle in 1682 as "Rivière des Yazous" in reference to the Yazoo tribe living near the river's mouth. The exact meaning of the term is unclear. One long held belief is that it means "river of death". The river is 188 miles long and is formed by the confluence of the Tallahatchie River and the Yalobusha River in Greenwood. The river parallels the Mississippi River in the latter's floodplain for some distance before joining it north of Vicksburg, Mississippi. Natural levees which flank the Mississippi prevent the Yazoo from joining it before Vicksburg. A "yazoo stream" is a hydrologic term which was coined to describe any river or major stream with similar characteristics. The French historically called the surrounding area of Mississippi and Alabama the Yazoo lands, after the river. This became the basis for naming the Yazoo Land Scandal of the late 18th and early 19th century. The river was of major importance during the American Civil War. The Confederates used the first electrically detonated underwater mine in the river in 1862 near Vicksburg to sink the Union ironclad USS Cairo. The last section of the Cairo was raised on December 12, 1964. It has been restored and is now on permanent display to the public at the Vicksburg National Military Park. There are 29 sunken ships from the Civil War beneath the waters of the river.

— Freebase

Fall River

Fall River

Fall River is a city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States. Fall River's population was 88,857 at the 2010 census, making it the tenth largest city in the state. The current mayor of the city is Will Flanagan, re-elected for a second term in 2011. Located along the eastern shore of Mount Hope Bay at the mouth of the Taunton River, the city became famous during the 19th century as the leading textile manufacturing center in the United States. While the textile industry has long since moved on, its impact on the city's culture and landscape remains to this day. Fall River's official motto is "We'll Try," dating back to the aftermath of the Great Fire of 1843. It is also nicknamed "the Scholarship City" because Dr. Irving Fradkin founded Dollars for Scholars here in 1958. Fall River is well known for Lizzie Borden, Portuguese Culture, and Battleship Cove the world's largest collection of World War II naval vessels and the home of the USS Massachusetts . Fall River is also the only city in the United States to have its city hall located over an interstate highway. Fall River was and is unique for the fact that it has two large lakes along with a large portion of protected woodlands on the eastern part of the city, which is higher in elevation, with the Quequechan River emptying out of the ponds and flowing 2.5 miles through the heart of the city, emptying out into the deep bay/estuary in the western part of the city. The Quequechan River once flowed through downtown unresticted providing and finally down a series of eight steep waterfalls falling 128 feet, into the Taunton River at the head of the deep Mount Hope Bay. Fall River is one of the few places on the east coast of the United States to have such special and rare features in its geography, along with the natural Fall River granite quarried there. The Quequechan River's great waterpower potential and natural granite helped form and shape Fall River into the city it is today.

— Freebase

Saint-Maurice River

Saint-Maurice River

The Saint-Maurice River is a river in central Quebec which flows south from Gouin Reservoir to empty into the Saint Lawrence River at Trois-Rivières, Quebec. The river is 563 km in length and has a drainage basin of 43,300 km². During the 18th century, early fur traders travelled along the river. During the second half of the 19th century, logging became an important industry in the surrounding Mauricie region. For much of the 20th century, the river was used to transport logs to mills down river and it was, and still is, a major source of hydroelectric power. The river was named after Maurice Poulin de La Fontaine, who owned property along the river in the 17th century. Communities on the river include: ⁕Trois-Rivières ⁕Shawinigan ⁕La Tuque Tributaries of this river include the: ⁕Trenche River ⁕Vermillon River ⁕Matawin River

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "spread out"?
  • A. circularise
  • B. dissipate
  • C. concentrated
  • D. unfold