Synonyms containing bear river

We've found 14,639 synonyms:

River

River

riv′ėr, n. a large running stream of water.—adj. Riv′erain, riparian.—ns. Riv′er-bank, the bank of a river; Riv′er-bās′in, the whole region drained by a river and its affluents; Riv′er-bed, the channel in which a river flows; Riv′er-birch, the red birch; Riv′er-bott′om, the alluvial land along the margin of a river; Riv′er-carp, the common carp; Riv′er-chub, the horny-head or jerker; Riv′er-course, the bed of a river; Riv′er-crab, a fresh-water crab; Riv′er-craft, small vessels which ply on rivers; Riv′er-cray′fish, a crayfish proper; Riv′er-dol′phin, a Gangetic dolphin; Riv′er-drag′on (Milt.), a crocodile; Riv′er-duck, a fresh-water duck; Riv′eret, Riv′erling, a small river; Riv′er-flat, alluvial land along a river; Riv′er-god, the tutelary deity of a river; Riv′er-head, the spring of a river; Riv′er-hog, the capybara; Riv′er-horse, the hippopotamus.—adj. Riv′erine, pertaining to, or resembling, a river.—ns. Riv′er-jack, the common water-snake of Europe; Riv′er-man, one who makes his livelihood by dragging the river for sunken goods; River-muss′el, a fresh-water mussel; Riv′er-ott′er, the common European otter; Riv′er-perch, a Californian surf-fish; Riv′er-pie, the water-ousel; Riv′er-shore, the shore or bank of a river; Riv′er-side, the bank of a river; Riv′er-smelt, the gudgeon; Riv′er-snail, a pond snail; Riv′er-swall′ow, the sand-martin; Riv′er-tide, the tide from the sea rising or ebbing in a river; Riv′er-tor′toise, a soft-shelled turtle; Riv′er-wall, a wall made to confine the waters of a river within definite bounds.—adj. Riv′ery, pertaining to rivers, like rivers. [Fr. rivière (It. riviera, shore, river)—Low L. riparia, a shore district—L. ripa, a bank.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bear

Bear

bār, v.t. to carry or support: to endure: to admit of: to be entitled to: to afford: to import: to manage: to behave or conduct one's self: to bring forth or produce.—v.i. to suffer: to be patient: to have reference to: to press (with on or upon): to be situated:—pr.p. bear′ing; pa.t. bōre; pa.p. bōrne (but the pa.p. when used to mean 'brought forth' is born).—adj. Bear′able, that may be borne or endured.—n. Bear′ableness.—adv. Bear′ably.—ns. Bear′er, one who or that which bears, esp. one who assists in carrying a body to the grave: a carrier or messenger; Bear′ing, behaviour: situation of one object with regard to another: relation: that which is borne upon an escutcheon: (mach.) the part of a shaft or axle in contact with its supports; Bear′ing-cloth, the mantle or cloth in which a child was carried to the font; Bear′ing-rein, the fixed rein between the bit and the saddle, by which a horse's head is held up in driving and its neck made to arch.—Bear hard (Shak.), to press or urge; Bear in hand (Shak.), to keep in expectation, to flatter one's hopes; To bear a hand, to give assistance; To bear away, to sail away; To bear down (with upon or towards), to sail with the wind; To bear out, to corroborate; To bear up, to keep up one's courage; To bear up for (a place), to sail towards; To bear with, to make allowance for; To be borne in (upon the) mind, to be forcibly impressed upon it; To bring to bear, to bring into operation (with against, upon); To lose one's bearings, to become uncertain as to one's position. [A.S. beran; Goth. bairan, L. ferre, Gr. pher-ein, Sans. bhri.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bear

Bear

bār, n. a heavy quadruped of the order Carnivora, with long shaggy hair and hooked claws: any rude, rough, or ill-bred fellow: one who sells stocks for delivery at a future date, anticipating a fall in price so that he may buy first at an advantage—opp. to Bull: the old phrase 'a bearskin jobber' suggests an origin in the common proverb, 'to sell the bearskin before one has caught the bear' (hence To bear, to speculate for a fall): (astron.) the name of two constellations, the Great and the Little Bear.—ns. Bear′-ber′ry, a trailing plant of the heath family, a species of the Arbutus; Bear′bine, a species of convolvulus, closely allied to the bindweed; Bear′-gar′den, an enclosure where bears are kept; a rude, turbulent assembly.—adj. Bear′ish, like a bear.—ns. Bear′ishness; Bear′-lead′er, a person who leads about a bear for exhibition: the tutor or governor of a youth at the university or on travel; Bear's′-breech, a common name for plants of the genus Acanthus; Bear's′-ear, a common English name for the auricula; Bear's′-foot, a species of hellebore; Bear′skin, the skin of a bear: a shaggy woollen cloth for overcoats: the high fur cap worn by the Guards in England; Bear′-ward, a warden or keeper of bears. [A.S. bera; Ger. bär; cf. L. fera, a wild beast, akin to Gr. thēr, Æolian phēr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Brown bear

Brown bear

The brown bear is a large bear distributed across much of northern Eurasia and North America. Adult bears generally weigh between 100 and 635 kg and its largest subspecies, the Kodiak bear, rivals the polar bear as the largest member of the bear family and as the largest land-based predator. There are several recognized subspecies within the brown bear species. In North America, two types of the subspecies Ursus arctos horribilis are generally recognized—the coastal brown bear and the inland grizzly bear; these two types broadly define the range of sizes of all brown bear subspecies. An adult grizzly living inland in Yukon may weigh as little as 80 kg, while an adult coastal brown bear in nearby coastal Alaska living on a steady, nutritious diet of spawning salmon may weigh as much as 680 kg. The exact number of overall brown subspecies remains in debate. While the brown bear's range has shrunk and it has faced local extinctions, it remains listed as a least concern species by the IUCN with a total population of approximately 200,000. As of 2012, this and the American black bear are the only bear species not classified as threatened by the IUCN. However, the Californian, North African, and Mexican subspecies were hunted to extinction in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the Marsican brown bear in central Italy is believed to have a population of just 30 to 40 bears.

— Freebase

Tibetan blue bear

Tibetan blue bear

The Tibetan bear or Tibetan blue bear is a subspecies of the brown bear found in the eastern Tibetan plateau. It is also known as the Himalayan blue bear, Himalayan snow bear, Tibetan brown bear, or the horse bear. In Tibetan it is known as Dom gyamuk. One of the rarest subspecies of bear in the world, the blue bear is rarely sighted in the wild. The blue bear is known in the west only through a small number of fur and bone samples. It was first classified in 1854. The blue bear is notable for having been suggested as one possible inspiration for sightings associated with the legend of the yeti. A 1960 expedition to search for evidence of the yeti, led by Sir Edmund Hillary, returned with two scraps of fur that had been identified by locals as 'yeti fur' that were later scientifically identified as being portions of the pelt of a blue bear. While it is unlikely that the blue bear generally occupies the high mountain peaks and snow fields where the yeti is sometimes sighted, it is possible that the occasional specimen might be observed traveling through these regions during times of reduced food supply, or in search of a mate.

— Freebase

to bear

to bear

The direction of an object from the viewer; it is used in the following different phrases: The land's end bore E.N.E.; i.e. it was seen from the ship in a line with the E.N.E. point of the compass. We bore down upon the enemy; i.e. having the advantage of the wind, or being to windward, we approached the enemy by sailing large, or from the wind. When a ship that was to windward comes under another ship's stern, and so gives her the wind, she is said to bear under the lee; often as a mark of respect. She bears in with the land, is said of a ship when she runs towards the shore. We bore off the land; i.e. we increased our distance from the land.--To bear down upon a ship, is to approach her from the windward.--To bear ordnance, to carry her guns well.--To bear sail, stiff under canvas.--To bear up, to put the helm up, and keep a vessel off her course, letting her recede from the wind and move to leeward; this is synonymous with to bear away, but is applied to the ship instead of the helm.--Bear up, one who has duly served for a commission, but from want of interest bears up broken-hearted and accepts an inferior warrant, or quits the profession, seeking some less important vocation; some middies have borne up and yet become bishops, lord-chancellors, judges, surgeons, &c.--To bear up round, is to put a ship right before the wind.--To bring a cannon to bear, signifies that it now lies right with the mark.--To bear off from, and in with the land, signifies standing off or going towards the coast.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Little Bear

Little Bear

Maurice Sendak's Little Bear is an educational Canadian children's television series starring a Little Bear voiced by Kristin Fairlie. Originally produced by Nelvana for Nickelodeon, it currently airs on Treehouse TV in Canada and Nick Jr. in the United States. It was first shown in the UK on the Children's BBC, and a part of Toy Box BBC video collection in the late 90s. It was also shown on Nick Jr UK and now airs on Tiny Pop. A direct-to-video/DVD full-length feature film was also created after the series ended. In The Little Bear Movie, Little Bear and his friends help a bear named Cub to help find his parents. It is based on the Little Bear series of books which were written by Else Holmelund Minarik, and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. Most of the characters are moderately anthropomorphic animals, exhibiting both animal and human behaviors, but generally dealing with human problems and concerns. However, Little Bear's friend, Emily, and her grandmother are human and Tutu, their dog, is mostly a normal pet. Other characters in the series include Little Bear and his parents Mother and Father Bear, his paternal uncle Rusty, his two grandparents, the eponymously named animals Duck, Cat, Owl and Hen, in addition to many recurring characters.

— Freebase

Polar bear

Polar bear

The polar bear is a carnivorous bear native largely within the Arctic Circle encompassing the Arctic Ocean, its surrounding seas and surrounding land masses. It is the world's largest bear, together with the omnivorous Kodiak bear, which is approximately the same size. A boar weighs around 350–700 kg, while a sow is about half that size. Although it is closely related to the brown bear, it has evolved to occupy a narrower ecological niche, with many body characteristics adapted for cold temperatures, for moving across snow, ice, and open water, and for hunting the seals which make up most of its diet. Although most polar bears are born on land, they spend most of their time at sea. Their scientific name means "maritime bear", and derives from this fact. Polar bears hunt their preferred food of seals from the edge of sea ice, often living off fat reserves when no sea ice is present. The polar bear is classified as a vulnerable species, with eight of the nineteen polar bear subpopulations in decline. For decades, large scale hunting raised international concern for the future of the species but populations rebounded after controls and quotas began to take effect. For thousands of years, the polar bear has been a key figure in the material, spiritual, and cultural life of Arctic indigenous peoples, and polar bears remain important in their cultures.

— Freebase

Bear River

Bear River

Bear River is a small clear slow moving river in the U.S. state of Michigan. 14.7 miles long, it is the largest tributary of Little Traverse Bay in the northwest of the lower peninsula. The river is formed as the outflow of Walloon Lake on the boundary between Charlevoix County and Emmet County, draining from the southeast end of the lake at 45°15′40″N 84°56′01″W / 45.26111°N 84.93361°W near the community of Walloon Lake in Melrose Township. M-75 has its northern terminus in a junction with US 131 nearby. The river flows east for about two miles before turning north through Bear Creek Township, angling northwest to empty into Little Traverse Bay in Petoskey at 45°22′38″N 84°57′39″W / 45.37722°N 84.96083°W. Petoskey was at first known as Bear River until being renamed in 1873. The Bear River itself has also been known as "Bear Creek" and "Ellis Creek". The river has excellent fishing and provides opportunities for peaceful canoeing or kayaking. The river is great for smelt fishing. For most of its path in Emmet County, River Road and the Tuscola and Saginaw Bay Railway parallel the river on its west banks.

— Freebase

Vermont Teddy Bear

Vermont Teddy Bear

The Vermont Teddy Bear Co., Inc. engages in the design, manufacture, and marketing of teddy bears. Its principal product line is the BearGram gift, a teddy bear customized to suit a special occasion or a life event, personalized with a greeting card and optional embroidery. The company™s BearGram delivery service involves sending personalized teddy bears directly to recipients for special occasions and holidays. In addition, the company sells and delivers Calyx & Corolla floral, PajamaGram, and TastyGram gifts. Its Calyx & Corolla delivery service involves sending flowers and plants with an up-scale arrangements and containers to recipients as gifts for special occasions and holidays. The company™s PajamaGram gift delivery service offers a variety of pajamas, and related sleepwear and spa products packaged with lavender tub tea and a personalized card in a keepsake organza hat-box. Its TastyGram gift delivery service includes regional food specialties delivered in a gift box with a personalized greeting card. The company markets its products through its Web site storefronts and retail stores. The Vermont Teddy Bear Company was founded by John Sortino in 1981 and is headquartered in Shelburne, Vermont. As of September 30, 2005, Vermont Teddy Bear Co. Inc. was taken private.

— CrunchBase

Ocean Renewable Power Company

Ocean Renewable Power Company

Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC generates electricity from tidal energy. The company develops technologies and projects that use river and ocean energy to produce electricity to power homes and businesses primarily in North America. It installs turbine generator units in groups to form complete power systems that convert river and ocean energy into grid-compatible power. The company offers RivGen power system, which generates electricity at small river sites particularly in remote communities with no centralized power grid; TidGen Power System for shallow tidal current applications; and OCGen power system for deeper tidal and ocean current applications. It also offers its technology to river and ocean energy projects, including grid-connected public and municipal electric utilities close to tidal or ocean current resources; remote coastal, island, and interior communities that are not grid-connected; independent developers of river, tidal, and ocean current energy projects; and military facilities near river, tidal, or ocean current resources. The company was founded in 2004 and is based in Portland, Maine.

— CrunchBase

American black bear

American black bear

The American black bear is a medium-sized bear native to North America. It is the continent's smallest and most widely distributed bear species. Black bears are omnivores with their diets varying greatly depending on season and location. They typically live in largely forested areas, but do leave forests in search of food. Sometimes they become attracted to human communities because of the immediate availability of food. The American black bear is the world's most common bear species. It is listed by the IUCN as Least Concern, due to the species' widespread distribution and a large global population estimated to be twice that of all other bear species combined. Along with the brown bear, it is one of only two of the eight modern bear species not considered globally threatened with extinction by the IUCN. American black bears often mark trees using their teeth and claws as a form of communication with other bears, a behavior common to many species of bears.

— Freebase

Bear claw

Bear claw

A bear claw is a sweet breakfast food, chiefly popular in the United States during the mid-1920s. It is an almond -flavored, yeast-raised pastry shaped in a large, irregular semicircle with slices around the outside, evoking the shape of a bear's claw. Bear claws often contain almond paste or raisins. Other fillings include butter pecan, dates, cream cheese, grape, cherry and apple—although this is often referred to as an apple fritter. Bear claws are also offered by doughnut shops as paw shaped doughnuts with apple pie–style filling, but the common interpretation of the bear claw is as a pastry rather than a doughnut. Bear claws are mentioned in the U.S. Regional Dialect Survey Results, Question #87, "Do you use the term 'bear claw' for a kind of pastry"? Bear claws are one of the doughnuts mentioned in the song Albuquerque by "Weird Al" Yankovic.

— Freebase

Logan

Logan

A river in the United States; flowing from the Bear River Mountains in Idaho into the Little Bear River at Benson, Utah.

— Wiktionary

Bear

Bear

an animal which has some resemblance to a bear in form or habits, but no real affinity; as, the woolly bear; ant bear; water bear; sea bear

— Webster Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. new
  • B. experient
  • C. unpracticed
  • D. callow