Synonyms containing belle isle

We've found 724 synonyms:

Belle

Belle

Belle is a fictional main character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' thirtieth animated feature film Beauty and the Beast. She subsequently appears in the film's two direct-to-video midquels Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas and Belle's Magical World, direct-to-video spin-off Belle's Tales of Friendship, and television series Sing Me a Story with Belle. From 1991 to 2011, Belle was voiced by American actress and singer Paige O'Hara, who auditioned for the role after she read about it in The New York Times. Since 2011, Belle has been voiced by American actress Julie Nathanson. Created by screenwriter Linda Woolverton and animated by James Baxter and Mark Henn, Belle is the daughter of an infamous inventor named Maurice, with whom she lives in a small town in France. Though perceived by her fellow villagers as "the most beautiful girl in town," Belle is considered strange and an outcast because of her love of reading and non-conformity. Romantically pursued by a handsome but arrogant hunter named Gaston, in whom she shows no romantic interest because of his conceitedness and sexist mentality, Belle dreams of leaving her provincial village life in favor of adventure. When her father is taken prisoner by the Beast, Belle sacrifices her own freedom, taking his place in order to save his life and eventually learning to accept him for who he is despite his appearance. Intelligent, strong-willed, outspoken and brave, Belle is a young woman who refuses to succumb to her village's outdated view on the role of women in society.

— Freebase

Belle Époque

Belle Époque

The Belle Époque or La Belle Époque was a period in French and Belgian history that is conventionally dated as starting in 1871 and ending when World War I began in 1914. Occurring during the era of the Third French Republic, it was a period characterized by optimism, peace at home and in Europe, new technology and scientific discoveries. The peace and prosperity in Paris allowed the arts to flourish, and many masterpieces of literature, music, theater, and visual art gained recognition. The Belle Époque was named, in retrospect, when it began to be considered a "golden age" in contrast to the horrors of World War I. In the newly rich United States, emerging from the Panic of 1873, the comparable epoch was dubbed the Gilded Age. In the United Kingdom, the Belle Époque overlapped with the late Victorian era and the Edwardian era. In Germany, the Belle Époque coincided with the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm II and in Russia with the reigns of Alexander III and Nicholas II.

— Freebase

Elmley

Elmley

Elmley is the local name for the Isle of Elmley, part of the Isle of Sheppey in Kent, England. It was also the name of a very late 19th century industrial village on the isle. Edward Hasted describes, in 1798, the isle as two eighths of the Isle of Sheppey (in turn) estimated as 11 miles by 8 miles. Its present National Nature Reserve covers more than the easily traceable area of the former isle by extending to the east, over Windmill Creek, one of two Sheppey inlets, former internal tidal channels.

— Wikipedia

Isle of Sheppey

Isle of Sheppey

The Isle of Sheppey is an island off the northern coast of Kent, England in the Thames Estuary, some 46 miles to the east of London. It has an area of 36 square miles. The island forms part of the local government district of Swale. Sheppey is derived from the ancient Saxon "Sceapige", meaning isle of sheep, and even today the extensive marshes which make up a considerable proportion of the island provide grazing for large flocks of sheep. The island, like much of north Kent, comprises London Clay and is a plentiful source of fossils. The land mass referred to as Sheppey comprises three main islands: Sheppey, the Isle of Harty and the Isle of Elmley, but the marshy nature of the land to the south of the island means that it is so crossed by channels and drains as to consist of a multitude of islands. The ground is mainly low-lying, but at The Mount near Minster rises to 250 feet above sea level. Some Sheppey inhabitants like to call themselves Swampies, a term that began as, and for some people remains, an insult; for others it has become a term of endearment or a phrase for reinforcing identity. The family names "Shippee" and "Shippey," found predominantly in New England, derives from those whose ancestors were from the Isle of Sheppey.

— Freebase

Lake Isle of Innisfree

Lake Isle of Innisfree

The "Lake Isle of Innisfree" is a poem written by William Butler Yeats in 1888. The poem was published first in the National Observer in 1890 and reprinted in The Countess Kathleen and Various Legends and Lyrics in 1892. One of Yeats's earlier poems, "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" was an attempt to create a form of poetry that was Irish in origin rather than one that adhered to the standards set by English poets and critics. The poem, unlike many others from the era, does not contain direct references to mysticism and the occult. It received critical success in the United Kingdom and France. He remembers Innisfree as a utopia that would supply all his needs. His memory tricks him into thinking it had a beautiful summer climate all year round. Lake Isle of Innisfree is not to be confused with the song, "The Isle of Innisfree". Although the two works share a similar title they are completely different and original in their own right but are very often mistakenly thought to be one and the same. "The Isle of Innisfree" is a song that was written in 1949 by Irish songwriter Dick Farrelly. The melody was used as the main theme of the film The Quiet Man.

— Freebase

Mozella

Mozella

Maureen Anne McDonald (born May 13, 1981) better known as Mozella is an American songwriter, singer and recording artist. Along with her album releases, Mozella co-wrote the Miley Cyrus Billboard #1 song "Wrecking Ball".Some of Mozella's other co-writes include the songs, "Drop Top" and "Horses" on Keith Urban's Graffiti U album, Kelly Clarkson's 2017 single "Love So Soft", "One Call Away" by Charlie Puth, "Fool's Gold" and "Perfect" by OneDirection, "Bright" by Echosmith, "Secrets" for Mary Lambert, Ellie Goulding's "Don't Panic", "Holding on for Life", and "We Can't Move to This" from Goulding's album Delirium (co-written with Goulding and Greg Kurstin), "Speechless" from Rachel Platten's Columbia released Wildfire, "Feels Like Vegas" with Tinashe, and "Take You High" off Kelly Clarkson's 2015 album, Piece by Piece. Madonna and Mozella co-wrote eleven of the nineteen tracks on the album Rebel Heart, including the single "Living for Love" with Diplo, Ariel Rechtshaid, and Toby Gad.In the genres of film, television and theater, she co-wrote "A Little Party Never Killed Nobody" with Goonrock and Fergie for Baz Luhrmann's The Great Gatsby. In early 2014 she continued her work with Baz Luhrmann, penning "A Beautiful Surprise" with David Foster for Luhrmann's musical theater adaption of his cult classic film Strictly Ballroom. She also co-wrote "Dancing in the Dark" by Rihanna for the DreamWorks animated movie Home, in 2015.Mozella's song "Anything is Possible" is used in the 2018 L’Oreal El Vive commercials. Her upbeat tune. Her song "Love Is Endless" was used in the 2015 McDonald's "Archenemies" television campaign. Beginning April 2015, Chase Bank used her song "Can't Get Enough" for their new commercials in the US. Some of the brands that have used Mozella's music in their branding include Chrysler, Verizon, Microsoft, Mercedes Benz, JC Penney, and many more. Mozella has released three full-length albums, I Will (Warner/Maverick, 2006), Belle Isle (Universal/Motown, 2009), and The Brian Holland Sessions (Belle Isle Records, 2012), as well as three EPs, Mozella (Warner/Maverick, 2005), The Straits (Universal/Motown, 2009) and The Love (Universal/Motown, 2010).

— Wikipedia

Gaston

Gaston

Gaston is the main villain in the Disney animated movie "Beauty and the Beast". He is a sexist, chauvinistic hunter who wants to marry Belle just so he can brag about it and to give him sons that he can mold at his will. He looks down on her intelligence and culture, believing that a woman's place should be in the kitchen, cooking and cleaning for her husband, not be able to read books and learn about the world. It's for that reason that Belle hates Gaston with a passion, she sees him as nothing more than a rude, selfish, chauvinist, barbarian-brained lunkhead and sexist man who is unworthy of her time. When Belle falls in love with the Beast, Gaston gets insanely jealous. He rallies the town into a mob, saying that the Beast is an evil monster (when, in truth, he is a caring and compassionate being), and together they storm the Beast's castle. Beast's servants fight off the mob, while Gaston goes to confront Beast at the balcony. After a fight, Beast refuses to kill Gaston, not willing to sink to his level. However, Gaston charges the Beast in a blind rage, accidentally falling from the balcony towards his potential death in doing so. He appears as a guest in "House of Mouse", when he's always saying "No one (verb)s like Gaston!". He is one of the Disney villains featured in "House of Villains".

— Freebase

Jean-Claude

Jean-Claude

Jean-Claude is a fictional character in the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series of novels by Laurell K. Hamilton. Within the novels, Jean-Claude's role is as one of the primary love interests of the series heroine, Anita Blake. Jean-Claude is a French-born vampire who is over 400–600 years old. He was a favorite of Belle Morte for his eyes, and, like many vampires of Belle Morte's line, Jean-Claude was selected for his almost perfect mortal beauty. He arrived in St. Louis and, indeed, the United States itself to escape Belle Morte's court with the help of Augustine. Jean-Claude became the Master Vampire of St. Louis after Anita Blake killed Nikolaos. Together with Richard Zeeman, Jean-Claude is a member of Anita's first triumvirate. Jean-Claude's daytime lair is the sub-basement of the Circus of the Damned. As owner of the "JC Corporation," he also owns and runs Guilty Pleasures, The Laughing Corpse, and Danse Macabre, as well as other clubs.

— Freebase

Yamakasi

Yamakasi

The Yamakasi (Lingala: ya makási) are the original group of parkour practitioners from Lisses, France. The nine founding members were David Belle, Sébastien Foucan, Châu Belle Dinh, Williams Belle, Yann Hnautra, Laurent Piemontesi, Guylain N'Guba Boyeke, Malik Diouf, and Charles Perriére. Their philosophy was that parkour builds an individual who is physically, mentally, and ethically strong. The name has been used in popular references to parkour, including in French films about admirable lawbreakers who do their physically demanding deeds for charitable ends. Members of the original group have continued to appear in video reports on their history and the practice.

— Wikipedia

British Isles

British Isles

A group of islands off the northwest coast of mainland Europe, comprising Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Wight, the Isles of Scilly, the Isle of Man, the Outer Hebrides, the Inner Hebrides, the Orkney Islands, the Shetland Islands and many other smaller islands. Use may include the Channel Islands, although these are physically closer to mainland Europe.

— Wiktionary

Isle of Wight

Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight, known to the ancient Romans as Vectis, is a county and the largest island of England, located in the English Channel, on average about 3 to 5 mi off the coast of Hampshire, separated from Great Britain by a strait called the Solent. It has the distinction of being England's smallest county - but for only half of the time. It has been calculated that during high tide Wight's area is slightly less than that of Rutland, but not during low tide. The island has many resorts which have been holiday destinations since Victorian times. Its rich history includes a brief status as an independent kingdom in the 15th century. Until 1995, like Jersey and Guernsey, the island had a Governor. Home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House at East Cowes, the island has a maritime and industrial tradition such as boat building, sail making, the manufacture of flying boats, the world's first hovercraft and the testing and development of Britain's space rockets. The Isle hosts annual festivals including the Isle of Wight International Jazz Festival, Bestival and the recently revived Isle of Wight Festival, which, in 1970, was the largest rock music event ever held. The island has well-conserved wildlife and some of the richest cliffs and quarries for dinosaur fossils in Europe.

— Freebase

Deemster

Deemster

A deemster is a judge in the Isle of Man. The High Court of Justice of the Isle of Man is presided over by a deemster or, in the case of the appeal division of that court, a deemster and the Judge of Appeal. The deemsters also promulgate the Laws on Tynwald Day by reading them out to the people in English and Manx. Previously the First and Second Deemsters had seats in the Legislative Council of the Isle of Man. The Second Deemster was removed in 1965 and the First Deemster in 1975. There are currently three full-time Deemsters in the Isle of Man. These are the First Deemster and Clerk of the Rolls, the Second Deemster, and an additional full-time Deemster. The offices of First Deemster, Second Deemster and Clerk of the Rolls are ancient offices. The offices of First Deemster and Clerk of the Rolls were combined in 1918, and a new office of Deputy Deemster was created in 2002 but abolished in 2009. Additional deemsters, full-time or part-time, may now be appointed; the present full-time additional deemster previously held the office of Deputy Deemster, and additional part-time deemsters are appointed from time to time to hear a particular case.

— Freebase

Bembridge

Bembridge

Bembridge is a village and civil parish located on the easternmost point of the Isle of Wight. It had a population of 3,848 according to the 2001 census of the United Kingdom, leading to the implausible claim by some residents that Bembridge is the largest village in England. Bembridge is home to many of the Island's wealthiest residents. The population had reduced to 3,688 at the 2011 Census. Bembridge sits at the extreme eastern point of the Isle of Wight. Prior to land reclamation the area of Bembridge and Yaverland was almost an island, separated from the remainder of the Isle of Wight by Brading Haven. On the Joan Blaeu map of 1665, Bembridge is shown as Binbridge Iſle, nearly separated from the rest of Wight by River Yar. Prior to the Victorian era Bembridge was a collection of wooden huts and farmhouses, which only consolidated into a true village with the building of the church in 1827 (later rebuilt in 1846).

— Wikipedia

belle-cousine

belle-cousine

Belle-fille d'oncle ou belle-fille de la tante ou nièce de la belle-mère ou nièce du beau-père.

— Editors Contribution

belle-grand-cousine

belle-grand-cousine

Belle-fille du grand-oncle ou belle-fille de la grand-tante ou nièce de la belle-grand-mère ou nièce du beau-grand-père.

— Editors Contribution

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