Synonyms containing booster pump

We've found 699 synonyms:

Pump

Pump

pump, n. a machine for raising water and other fluids to a higher level: a machine for drawing out or forcing in air.—v.t. to raise with a pump: to draw out information by artful questions.—v.i. to work a pump: to raise water by pumping.—ns. Pump′age, the amount pumped; Pump′-barr′el, the cylinder which forms the body of a pump.—pa.p. Pumped (coll.), out of breath, panting—sometimes with out.—ns. Pump′er; Pump′-gear, the various parts which make up a pump; Pump′-hand′le, the lever by means of which the pump is worked; Pump′-head, -hood, a frame covering the upper wheel of a chain-pump, serving to guide the water into the discharge-spout; Pump′ing-en′gine, any form of motor for operating a pump; Pump′-rod, the rod by which the handle is fixed to the bucket which moves up and down inside; Pump′-room, the apartment at a mineral spring in which the waters are drunk; Pump′-well, a well from which water is got by pumping.—Pump ship, to urinate. [O. Fr. pompe (cf. Ger. pumpe); perh. conn. with plump.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sump pump

Sump pump

A sump pump is a pump used to remove water that has accumulated in a water-collecting sump basin, commonly found in the basements of homes. The water may enter via the perimeter drains of a basement waterproofing system, funneling into the basin or because of rain or natural ground water, if the basement is below the water table level. Sump pumps are used where basement flooding happens regularly and to solve dampness where the water table is above the foundation of a home. Sump pumps send water away from a house to any place where it is no longer problematic, such as a municipal storm drain or a dry well. Pumps may discharge to the sanitary sewer in older installations. Once considered acceptable, this practice may now violate the plumbing code or municipal bylaws, because it can overwhelm the municipal sewage treatment system. Municipalities urge homeowners to disconnect and reroute sump pump discharge away from sanitary sewers. Fines may be imposed for noncompliance. Many homeowners have inherited their sump pump configurations and do not realize that the pump discharges into the sewer. Usually hardwired into a home's electrical system, sump pumps may have a battery backup. The home's pressurized water supply powers some pumps, eliminating the need for electricity at the expense of using potable water, potentially making them more expensive to operate than electrical pumps and creating an additional water disposal problem. Since a sump basin may overflow if not constantly pumped, a backup system is important for cases when the main power is out for prolonged periods of time, as during a severe storm. There are generally two types of sump pumps—pedestal and submersible. In the case of the pedestal pump, the motor is mounted above the sump—where it is more easily serviced, but is also more conspicuous. The pump impeller is driven by a long, vertical extension shaft and the impeller is in a scroll housing in the base of the pump. The submersible pump, on the other hand, is entirely mounted inside the sump, and is specially sealed to prevent electrical short circuits. There is debate about which variety of sump pump is better. Pedestal sump pumps usually last longer (25 to 30 years) if they are installed properly and kept free of debris. They are less expensive and easier to remove. Submersible pumps will only last 5 to 15 years. They are more expensive to purchase but can take up debris without clogging.Sump pump systems are also utilized in industrial and commercial applications to control water table-related problems in surface soil. An artesian aquifer or periodic high water table situation can cause the ground to become unstable due to water saturation. As long as the pump functions, the surface soil will remain stable. These sumps are typically ten feet in depth or more; lined with corrugated metal pipe that contains perforations or drain holes throughout. They may include electronic control systems with visual and audible alarms and are usually covered to prevent debris and animals from falling in.

— Wikipedia

Bilge pump

Bilge pump

A bilge pump is a water pump used to remove bilge water. Since fuel can be present in the bilge, electric bilge pumps are designed to not cause sparks. Electric bilge pumps are often fitted with float switches which turn on the pump when the bilge fills to a set level. Since bilge pumps can fail, use of a backup pump is often advised. The primary pump is normally located at the lowest point of the bilge, while the secondary pump would be located somewhat higher. This ensures that the secondary pump activates only when the primary pump is overwhelmed or fails, and keeps the secondary pump free of the debris in the bilge that tends to clog the primary pump. Ancient bilge "force pumps" had a number of common uses. Depending on where the pump was located in the hull of the ship, it could be used to suck in sea water into a live fish tank to preserve fish until the ship was docked and the fish ready to be sold. Another use of the force pump was to combat fires. Water would again be sucked in through the bottom of the hull, and then pumped onto the blaze. Yet another suggested use for a force pump was to dispel water from a ship. The pump would be placed near the bottom of the hull so as to suck water out of the ship. Force pumps were used on land as well. They could be used to bring water up from a well or to fill high placed tanks so that water could be pressure pumped from these tanks. These tanks were for household use and/or small-scale irrigation. The force pump was portable and could therefore, as on ships, be used to fight fire.

— Freebase

Hydraulic pump

Hydraulic pump

Hydraulic pumps are used in hydraulic drive systems and can be hydrostatic or hydrodynamic. A hydraulic pump is a mechanical source of power that converts mechanical power into hydraulic energy (hydrostatic energy i.e. flow, pressure). It generates flow with enough power to overcome pressure induced by the load at the pump outlet. When a hydraulic pump operates, it creates a vacuum at the pump inlet, which forces liquid from the reservoir into the inlet line to the pump and by mechanical action delivers this liquid to the pump outlet and forces it into the hydraulic system. Hydrostatic pumps are positive displacement pumps while hydrodynamic pumps can be fixed displacement pumps, in which the displacement (flow through the pump per rotation of the pump) cannot be adjusted, or variable displacement pumps, which have a more complicated construction that allows the displacement to be adjusted. Hydrodynamic pumps are more frequent in day-to-day life. Hydrostatic pumps of various types all work on the principle of Pascal's law.

— Wikipedia

Booster pump

Booster pump

A booster pump is a machine which will increase the pressure of a fluid. They may be used with liquids or gases, but the construction details will vary depending on the fluid. A gas booster is similar to a gas compressor, but generally a simpler mechanism which often has only a single stage of compression, and is used to increase pressure of a gas already above ambient pressure. Two-stage boosters are also made. Boosters may be used for increasing gas pressure, transferring high pressure gas, charging gas cylinders and scavenging. On new construction and retrofit projects, water pressure booster pumps are used to provide adequate water pressure to upper floors of high rise buildings. The need for a water pressure booster pump can also arise after the installation of a backflow prevention device (BFP), which is currently mandated in many municipalities to protect the public water supplies from contaminants within a building entering the public water supply. The use of BFPs began after The Clean Water Act was passed. These devices can cause a loss of 12 PSI, and can cause flushometers on upper floors not to work properly. After pipes have been in service for an extended period, scale can build up on the inside surfaces which will cause a pressure drop when the water flows.

— Wikipedia

Fire pump

Fire pump

A fire pump is a part of a fire sprinkler system's water supply and powered by electric, diesel or steam. The pump intake is either connected to the public underground water supply piping, or a static water source (e.g., tank, reservoir, lake). The pump provides water flow at a higher pressure to the sprinkler system risers and hose standpipes. A fire pump is tested and listed for its use specifically for fire service by a third-party testing and listing agency, such as UL or FM Global. The main code that governs fire pump installations in North America is the National Fire Protection Association's NFPA 20 Standard for the Installation of Stationary Fire Pumps for Fire Protection.Fire pumps function either by an electric motor or a diesel engine, or, occasionally a steam turbine. If the local building code requires power independent of the local electric power grid, a pump using an electric motor may utilize, when connected via a listed transfer switch, the installation of an emergency generator. The fire pump starts when the pressure in the fire sprinkler system drops below a threshold. The sprinkler system pressure drops significantly when one or more fire sprinklers are exposed to heat above their design temperature, and opens, releasing water. Alternately, other fire hoses reels or other firefighting connections are opened, causing a pressure drop in the fire fighting main. Fire pumps are needed when the local municipal water system cannot provide sufficient pressure to meet the hydraulic design requirements of the fire sprinkler system. This usually occurs if the building is very tall, such as in high-rise buildings, or in systems that require a relatively high terminal pressure at the fire sprinkler in order to provide a large volume of water, such as in storage warehouses. Fire pumps are also needed if fire protection water supply is provided from a ground level water storage tank. Types of pumps used for fire service include: horizontal split case, vertical split case, vertical inline, vertical turbine, and end suction.

— Wikipedia

Submersible pump

Submersible pump

A submersible pump (or sub pump, electric submersible pump (ESP)) is a device which has a hermetically sealed motor close-coupled to the pump body. The whole assembly is submerged in the fluid to be pumped. The main advantage of this type of pump is that it prevents pump cavitation, a problem associated with a high elevation difference between pump and the fluid surface. Submersible pumps push fluid to the surface as opposed to jet pumps which create a vacuum and rely upon atmospheric pressure. Submersibles use pressurised fluid from the surface to drive a hydraulic motor downhole, rather than an electric motor, and are used in heavy oil applications with heated water as the motive fluid.

— Wikipedia

Dry sump

Dry sump

A dry sump is a lubricating motor oil management method for four-stroke and large two-stroke piston internal combustion engines that uses external pumps and a secondary external reservoir for oil, as compared to a conventional wet sump system. Four-stroke engines are both lubricated and cooled by oil which is circulated throughout the engine feeding the various bearings and other moving parts of the engine; and thereafter allowed to drain to the sump at the base of the engine under gravity. In most production automobiles, which use a wet sump system, this oil is simply collected in a 3 to 10 litres capacity pan at the base of the engine, known as the oil sump, where it is circulated back through the engine by an oil pump drawing, or "scavenging" from the sump's reservoir. This pump is mounted internally to the engine and is typically driven by the camshaft. In a dry sump, the oil still falls to the base of the engine, but rather than being allowed to collect in a reservoir style oil sump it falls into a much shallower sump where it is removed by one or more externally mounted scavenge pumps and is pumped into an external reservoir where it is both cooled and deaerated. These pumps are typically belt-driven from the front or back of the crankshaft. Oil is then drawn from this reservoir by the pressure pump and circulated through the engine. Typical dry sump systems have the pressure pump and scavenge pumps mounted on a common shaft so that one pulley at the front of the system can run as many pumps as required by the design of the engine. It is common practice to have one scavenge pump per crankcase section and in the case of a V-type engine an additional scavenge pump to remove oil being fed to the valve gear. Therefore, a V-8 engine would have five scavenge pumps and a pressure pump in the pump "stack".

— Freebase

Diffusion pump

Diffusion pump

Diffusion pumps use a high speed jet of vapor to direct gas molecules in the pump throat down into the bottom of the pump and out the exhaust. Presented in 1915 by Wolfgang Gaede and using mercury vapor, they were the first type of high vacuum pumps operating in the regime of free molecular flow, where the movement of the gas molecules can be better understood as diffusion than by conventional fluid dynamics. Gaede used the name diffusion pump since his design was based on the finding that gas cannot diffuse against the vapor stream, but will be carried with it to the exhaust. However, the principle of operation might be more precisely described as gas-jet pump, since diffusion plays a role also in other high vacuum pumps. In modern text books, the diffusion pump is categorized as a momentum transfer pump. The diffusion pump is widely used in both industrial and research applications. Most modern diffusion pumps use silicone oil or polyphenyl ethers as the working fluid. Cecil Reginald Burch discovered the possibility of using silicone oil in 1928.

— Freebase

Booster club

Booster club

A booster club is an American organization that is formed to support an associated club, sports team, or organization. Booster clubs are popular in American schools at the high school and university level. The clubs are generally run and organized by the parents of the students in the supported organization in high schools, and by athletic supporters and fans at colleges. It is not a social club. Its main function is to develop support for the student program. For example, fundraisers are often held to raise money for supplies or equipment that the students may need or for trips that the students may need to take. The main principle of funding by a U.S. IRS 501 nonprofit is that the booster club may not discriminate in making grants to youth or college students on the basis of their family's membership in or funding to the club, or the family's fund-raising or time put into club activities. A popular way for booster clubs to raise money is with raffles held at sporting events for some item that would be donated by a local business, clothing such as t-shirts with the school's name and mascot on it, or the sale of popcorn, hot dogs, and other food items to the fans who attend the game/tournament/etc. Membership fees are also a key fundraising element, especially at the college level.

— Freebase

Booster dose

Booster dose

In medicine, a booster dose is an extra administration of a vaccine after an earlier dose. After initial immunization, a booster injection or booster dose is a re-exposure to the immunizing antigen cell. It is intended to increase immunity against that antigen back to protective levels after it has been shown to have decreased or after a specified period. For example, tetanus shot boosters are often recommended every 10 years. If a patient receives a booster dose this is a good thing but already has a high level of antibody, then a reaction called an Arthus reaction could develop, a localized form of Type III hypersensitivity, induced by fixation of complement by preformed circulating antibodies. In severe cases, the degree of complement fixation can be so substantial that it induces local tissue necrosis.

— Freebase

Force pump

Force pump

a pump adapted for delivering water at a considerable height above the pump, or under a considerable pressure; in distinction from one which lifts the water only to the top of the pump or delivers it through a spout. See Illust. of Plunger pump, under Plunger

— Webster Dictionary

Gucci Gang

Gucci Gang

"Gucci Gang" is a song by American rapper Lil Pump, as the fifth single from his self-titled debut mixtape Lil Pump (2017). It was originally released on Lil Pump's SoundCloud account on August 27, 2017, but was released for digital download and streaming by Tha Lights Global and Warner Bros. Records on August 31, 2017. It is Lil Pump's highest charting single to date, peaking at number three on the US Billboard Hot 100.

— Editors Contribution

Pressure washer

Pressure washer

A pressure washer is a high pressure mechanical sprayer that can be used to remove loose paint, mold, grime, dust, mud, and dirt from surfaces and objects such as buildings, vehicles, concrete surfaces, etc. The volume of a pressure washer is expressed in either gallons or litres per minute, often designed into the pump and not variable. A pump's pressure, expressed in pounds per square inch, pascals, or bar, is also designed into the pump but can be varied by adjusting the unloader valve. Machines that produce pressures from 750 to 30,000 psi or more are available. The basic pressure washer consists of: ⁕An electric motor or gasoline engine that directly drives a water pump ⁕A high-pressure hose ⁕Trigger gun-style switch Similarly as a garden hose nozzle is used to increase the velocity of the liquid, a pressure washer adds its own power to create high pressure and velocity. The pump cannot draw more water from the pipe to which the washer is connected than that source can provide. Moreover, the water supply must be adequate for a given machine connected to it, as water starvation leads to cavitation damage of the pump elements.

— Freebase

Bicycle pump

Bicycle pump

A bicycle pump is a type of positive-displacement pump specifically designed for inflating bicycle tires. It has a connection or adapter for use with one or both of the two most common types of valves used on bicycles, Schrader or Presta. A third type of valve called the Woods valve exists, but tubes with these valves can be filled using a Presta pump. Several basic types are available: ⁕Floor models or track pumps ⁕Frame mounted ⁕Compact or mini ⁕Foot operated ⁕Double action In its most basic form, a bicycle pump functions via a hand-operated piston. During the up-stroke, this piston draws air through a one-way valve into the pump from the outside. During the down-stroke, the piston then displaces the air from the pump into the bicycle tire. Most floor pumps, also commonly called track pumps, have a built in pressure gauge to indicate tire pressure. Electrically-operated pumps intended to inflate car tyres can in principle be used to inflate a bicycle tyre if the right type of connection is available. Some such pumps are designed to cut off before a suitable pressure, and will much underinflate the tyre. Others may not cut off, but deliver a high rate of flow to fill the larger car tyre, with a risk of overinflating and bursting a bicycle tyre unless it is stopped with split-second timing.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. fibrous
  • B. thready
  • C. threadlike
  • D. thick