Synonyms containing boot sequence

We've found 2,576 synonyms:

Boot jack

Boot jack

A boot jack, sometimes known as a boot pull, is a small tool which aids in the removal of boots. It consists of a U-shaped mouth which grips the heel of the boot, and a flat area to which weight can be applied. To operate it, the user places the heel of the boot in the mouth of the jack, stands on the back of the device with the other foot, and pulls his foot free of the front boot. The process is then repeated to remove the other boot. The boot jack has several advantages over the removal of boots by hand. By allowing the wearer to pull his foot straight up and out of the boot, and by using his full body weight to hold the boot in place, far greater leverage and a much more secure grip are possible than can be achieved with the hands. In addition, the wearer is spared the inconvenience of having to bend over or sit down to remove the boots, or directly handle them if they are dirty. The function of the boot jack can be approximated with a variety of other objects that may be on hand, ranging from a convenient piece of furniture to a rifle butt, but these generally cannot remove the boot as easily as a proper boot jack. An adequate naturally-occurring bootjack is formed by the base of cabbage palm Sabal palmetto leaf and these leaf bases are consequently called bootjacks. Additionally, the sole of a boot still being worn can also function as an improvised jack, but the wearer using one foot to remove the opposite boot often lacks proper leverage to successfully remove a snug-fitting boot, particularly a tall boot.

— Freebase

Boot

Boot

bōōt, n. a covering for the foot and lower part of the leg generally made of leather: an infamous instrument of judicial torture, in which the legs were forced into a strong case and wedges driven in until bone, muscle, and marrow were crushed together—also Boot′ikin: a box or receptacle in a coach.—v.t. to put on boots.—n. Boot′-clos′er, one who closes the upper leathers of boots.—pa.p. Boot′ed, having boots on, equipped for riding.—ns. Boot′-hook, an instrument for pulling on long boots; Boot′hose (Shak.), hose or stockings used in place of boots; Boot′-jack, an instrument for taking off boots; Boot′lace, a lace for fastening boots; Boot′-last, Boot′-tree, the last or wooden mould on which boots or shoes are made or stretched to keep their shape.—adj. Boot′less, without boots: referring also, as in Tennyson's metaphorical use, 'wedded to a bootless calf,' to the ancient custom at a marriage by proxy of the quasi bridegroom putting one unbooted leg into the bride's bed.—n. Boots, the servant at an inn who cleans the boots, runs messages, &c.—in combination, as Lazyboots, Slyboots.—Boot and saddle (a corr. of Fr. bouteselle, place saddle), the signal to cavalry to mount.—Like old boots (slang), vigorously, heartily.—Six feet in his boots, quite six feet high.—To die in his boots, to be cut off in the midst of health, as by the rope; To have one's heart in one's boots, to be in a state of extreme terror. [O. Fr. bote (mod. botte)—Low L. botta, bota, of dubious origin.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Car boot sale

Car boot sale

Car boot sales or boot fairs are a mainly British form of market in which private individuals come together to sell household and garden goods. The term refers to the selling of items from a car's boot. Although a small proportion of sellers are professional traders selling goods, or indeed browsing for items to sell, the goods on sale are often used but no longer wanted personal possessions. Car boot sales are a way of focusing a large group of people in one place to recycle still useful but unwanted domestic items that previously might have been thrown away. Car boot sales generally take place within the summer months, however a growing trend of indoor boot sales and all year hard-standing outdoor boot sales are now appearing in some parts of the UK. Items sold can include antiques and collectables, anything in fact that the person wishes to sell, rather like a flea market. Car boot sales are also very popular in parts of Australia, and have a growing presence in mainland Europe.

— Freebase

Boot Camp

Boot Camp

Boot Camp is a multi boot utility included with Apple Inc.'s OS X that assists users in installing Microsoft Windows operating systems on Intel-based Macintosh computers. The utility's Boot Camp Assistant guides users through non-destructive disk partitioning of their hard disk drive and installation of Windows device drivers. The utility also installs a Windows Control Panel applet for selecting the boot operating system. Initially introduced as an unsupported beta for Mac OS X Tiger, the utility was first included with Mac OS X Leopard and has been included in subsequent versions of the operating system ever since. Previous versions of Boot Camp supported Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7. Boot Camp 4.0 for Mac OS X Snow Leopard up to OS X Mountain Lion version 10.8.2 only supported Windows 7. However, with the release of Boot Camp 5.0 for OS X Mountain Lion version 10.8.3, only 64-bit versions of Windows 7 and Windows 8 are officially supported. Users have also installed Linux using the utility, although Apple has not listed support for Linux operating systems.

— Freebase

Shine-Dalgarno sequence

Shine-Dalgarno sequence

The Shine-Dalgarno sequence, proposed by Australian scientists John Shine and Lynn Dalgarno, is a ribosomal binding site in the mRNA, generally located 8 bases upstream of the start codon AUG. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence exists both in bacteria and archaea, being also present in some chloroplastic and mitochondial transcripts. The six-base consensus sequence is AGGAGG; in E. coli, for example, the sequence is AGGAGGU. This sequence helps recruit the ribosome to the mRNA to initiate protein synthesis by aligning it with the start codon. The complementary sequence, is called the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence and is located at the 3' end of the 16S rRNA in the ribosome. The eukaryotic equivalent of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence is called the Kozak sequence. Mutations in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence can reduce or increase translation. This change is due to a reduced or increased mRNA-ribosome pairing efficiency, as evidenced by the fact that complementary mutations in the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence can restore translation. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence GAGG dominates in bacteriophage T4 early genes, whereas the sequence GGAG is a target for the T4 endonuclease RegB that initiates the early mRNA degradation.

— Freebase

Boot

Boot

bōōt, v.t. to profit or advantage.—n. advantage: profit: any reparation or compensation paid, like the man-bote of old English law: (Shak.) booty.—adj. Boot′less, without boot or profit: useless.—adv. Boot′lessly.—n. Boot′lessness.—To boot, in addition; To make boot of (Shak.), to make profit of. [A.S. bót, compensation, amends, whence betan, to amend, to make Better.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Buskin

Buskin

A buskin is a knee- or calf-length boot made of leather or cloth which laces closed, but is open across the toes. It was worn by Athenian tragic actors, hunters and soldiers in Ancient Greek, Etruscan, and Roman societies. The word buskin, only recorded in English since 1503 meaning "half boot", is of unknown origin, perhaps from Old French brousequin or directly from its Middle Dutch model brosekin "small leather boot". Figurative senses relating to tragedy are from the word being used to translate Greek kothurnos or Latin cothurnos, the high, thick-soled boot worn in Athenian tragedy; contrasted with sock, the low shoe worn by comedians. Byzantine emperors were formally clad in purple buskins, embroidered in gold with double-headed eagles. In rural Norfolk, buskins made of sacking were worn by farm labourers prior to the 1960s, especially at haymaking and wheat harvest, to prevent rats from running up the inside of the trouser legs. It is also used as a name of a torturing device used in the Middle Ages, for example the Scotch Boot. See Boot.

— Freebase

Boot sector

Boot sector

A boot sector or boot block is a region of a hard disk, floppy disk, optical disc, or other data storage device that contains machine code to be loaded into random-access memory by a computer system's built-in firmware. The purpose of a boot sector is to allow the boot process of a computer to load a program stored on the same storage device. The location and size of the boot sector is specified by the design of the computing platform. On an IBM PC compatible machine, the BIOS selects a boot device, then copies the first sector from the device, into physical memory at memory address 0x7C00. On other systems, the process may be quite different.

— Freebase

Boot disk

Boot disk

A boot disk is a removable digital data storage medium from which a computer can load and run an operating system or utility program. The computer must have a built-in program which will load and execute a program from a boot disk meeting certain standards. Boot disks are used for: ⁕Operating system installation ⁕Data recovery ⁕Data purging ⁕Hardware or software troubleshooting ⁕BIOS flashing ⁕Customizing an operating environment ⁕Software demonstration ⁕Administrative access in case of lost password is possible with an appropriate boot disk with some operating systems ⁕Games While almost all modern computers can boot from a hard drive containing the operating system and other software, they would not normally be called boot disks. CD-ROMs are the most common forms of media used, but other media, such as magnetic or paper tape drives, zip drives, and more recently USB flash drives can be used. The computer's BIOS must support booting from the device in question.

— Freebase

boot block

boot block

A dedicated block usually at the beginning (first block on first track) of a storage medium that holds special data used to start a system. Some systems use a boot block of several physical sectors, while some use only one boot sector. Other manufacturers use the terms boot block and boot sector interchangeably.

— Wiktionary

boot sector

boot sector

A dedicated sector usually at the beginning (first sector on first track) of a storage medium that holds special data used to start a system. Some systems use a boot block of several physical sectors, while some use only one boot sector. Other manufacturers use the terms boot block and boot sector interchangeably.

— Wiktionary

Sequence

Sequence

In mathematics, informally speaking, a sequence is an ordered list of objects. Like a set, it contains members. The number of ordered elements is called the length of the sequence. Unlike a set, order matters, and exactly the same elements can appear multiple times at different positions in the sequence. Most precisely, a sequence can be defined as a function whose domain is a countable totally ordered set, such as the natural numbers. For example, is a sequence of letters with the letter 'M' first and 'Y' last. This sequence differs from. Also, the sequence, which contains the number 1 at two different positions, is a valid sequence. Sequences can be finite, as in this example, or infinite, such as the sequence of all even positive integers. Finite sequences are sometimes known as strings or words and infinite sequences as streams. The empty sequence is included in most notions of sequence, but may be excluded depending on the context.

— Freebase

Mukluk

Mukluk

Mukluks or Kamik are a soft boot traditionally made of reindeer skin or sealskin and were originally worn by Arctic aboriginal people, including the Inuit and Yupik. The term mukluk is often used for any soft boot designed for cold weather and modern designs are often similar to high-top athletic shoes. The word "mukluk" is of Yupik origin, from maklak, the bearded seal, while "kamik" is an Inuit word. In the Inuipiaq language the "u" makes an "oo" sound, and so the spelling "maklak" is used with the same pronunciation. Another type of boot, sometimes called an Inuit boot, originating in Greenland and the eastern part of Alaska, are made by binding them with animal cartilage and have a centre seam running down to the foot of the boot. Mukluks weigh little and allow hunters to move very quietly. They may be adorned with pompons and beads and may be lined with furs such as rabbit, fox and raccoon. The design of the mukluk is used for the industrial manufacture of cold-weather boots, especially paired with a rugged contemporary sole. The key component of its success is its ability to breathe, that is, to allow air exchange. This is an advantage in extremely cold conditions where perspiration may become a factor in frostbite on your feet. The bulkiness paired with their poor performance in slush makes them less ideal for the casual winter wearer.

— Freebase

SILO

SILO

The SPARC Improved bootLOader is the bootloader used by the SPARC port of the Linux operating system; it can also be used for Solaris as a replacement for the standard Solaris boot loader. SILO generally looks similar to the basic version of LILO, giving a "boot:" prompt, at which the user can press the Tab key to see the available images to boot. The configuration file format is reasonably similar to LILO's, as well as some of the command-line options. However, SILO differs significantly from LILO because it reads and parses the configuration file at boot time, so it is not necessary to re-run it after every change to the file or to the installed kernel images. SILO is able to access ext2, ext3, UFS, romfs and ISO 9660 file systems, enabling it to boot arbitrary kernels from them. SILO also has support for transparent decompression of gzipped vmlinux images, making the bzImage format unnecessary on SPARC Linux. SILO is loaded from the SPARC PROM. Licensed under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

— Freebase

Moon Boot

Moon Boot

Moon Boots are footwear first created in the early 1970s by manufacturer Tecnica Group of Giavera del Montello, Italy. They became a notable fashion trend throughout the 1980s. The boot is constructed with a thin rubber outsole and cellular rubber midsole covered by colorful Nylon fabrics and using polyurethane foams. Tecnica registered worldwide the trademark Moon Boot® name in 1978. As of 2010 Tecnica still offers the Moon Boot though there are many imitators. With the trademark's registrations, the authentic Tecnica boot is the only one able to be marketed as a "Moon Boot®". Since 2011 they have been produced in Ukraine, at the rate of some 700,000 per year.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of the term "pathologic"?
  • A. ghoulish
  • B. diseased
  • C. healthy
  • D. morbid