Synonyms containing bow to

We've found 998 synonyms:

Bow

Bow

bō, n. a piece of elastic wood or other material for shooting arrows, bent by means of a string stretched between its two ends: anything of a bent or curved shape, as the rainbow: the instrument by which the strings of a violin are sounded: a ring of metal forming a handle: a knot composed of one or of two loops and two ends (single bow, double bow), a looped knot of ribbons, a necktie or the like, so tied.—adj. Bow′bent (Milton), bent like a bow.—n. Bow′-boy, a boy archer: (Shak.) Cupid.—n.pl. Bow′-com′passes, compasses, one leg of which slides on a bow or curved plate of metal to steady its motion: a small pair of compasses for describing circles with ink or pencil.—adj. Bowed.—ns. Bow′-hand, in archery, the left hand, the one by which the bow is held: (mus.) the right hand, the one that draws the bow; Bow′-leg, a leg crooked like a bow.—adj. Bow′-legged, having crooked legs.—ns. Bow′line, a rope from the weather side of the square sails (to which it is fastened by bridles) to the larboard or starboard bow, to keep the sail close to the wind; Bow′man, an archer; Bow′shot, the distance to which an arrow can be shot from a bow; Bow′string, the string by which a bow is drawn: a string with which the Turks strangled offenders; Bow′-win′dow, a bent or semicircular window.—adj. Bow′-win′dowed (slang), pot-bellied.—n. Bow′yer (obs.), a bowman: a maker of bows.—Bowline knot, a simple but secure knot, used in fastening the bowline bridles to the cringles.—On the bow hand, wide of the mark.—To draw the long bow, to make extravagant statements; To have two (or more) strings to one's bow, to have other alternatives. [A.S. boga; cog. with Ger. bogen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Recurve bow

Recurve bow

A recurve bow is a bow with limbs that curve away from the archer when unstrung. A recurve bow stores more energy and delivers energy more efficiently than the equivalent straight-limbed bow, giving a greater amount of energy and speed to the arrow. A recurve will permit a shorter bow than the simple straight limb bow for a given arrow energy and this form was often preferred by archers in environments where long weapons could be cumbersome, such as in brush and forest terrain, or while on horseback. Recurved limbs also put greater stress on the materials used to make the bow, and they may make more noise with the shot. Extreme recurves make the bow unstable when being strung. An unstrung recurve bow can have a confusing shape and many Native American weapons, when separated from their original owners and cultures, were incorrectly strung backwards and destroyed when attempts were made to shoot them.

— Wikipedia

Bow rider

Bow rider

A bow rider is a kind of runabout boat typically between 17' and 30', use stern drive or outboard engines, and hold between six and ten people. To distinguish it from a cuddy boat, it has an open bow area where there are extra seats in front of the helm station. This term can be confused with bow riding, a dangerous and often illegal activity involving sitting or standing on the bow while the boat is underway. They are well suited for many recreational water sports such as tubing, water skiing, and swimming, however a Center Console or Walkaround type boat is more practical for fishing. Bow riders are well suited for lakes and inland water. In heavy seas the open bow and lower gunwales may cause the boat to take on more water into the bilge. A bow rider or bowrider is a type of boat which has a seating area in the bow, the forward part of the ship. Bow riders are generally designed for recreational use such as day cruising or water skiing, and they come in a variety of styles from luxurious to basic. Several manufacturers of boats produce bow riders, in both mass production and custom models for their clients, and such boats are often available for rental at facilities which offer boats for rent to people who do not maintain their own watercraft.

— Freebase

musical bow

musical bow

The musical bow is a simple string musical instrument present in most archaic cultures as well as many in the present day. It consists of a string supported by a flexible stick 1.5 to 10 feet long, and strung end to end with a taut cord. Usually made out of wood. Often, it is a normal archery bow used for music rather than as a weapon. Although the bow is now thought of as a weapon, it is not clear whether it was used in this way originally. Cave paintings in southern France dated to around 15,000 BCE which would approximately be 13,000 to 15,000 years ago from the present day, display a bow being used as a musical instrument, so this use certainly has a long history. Musical bows are still used in a number of cultures today, almost all over the world. In the United States the musical bow is primarily found in the Appalachian Mountains, where it is called a mouthbow or mouth bow. The usual way to make the bow sound is to pluck the string, although sometimes a subsidiary bow is used to scrape the string, much as on a violin. The Onavillu of Kerala sounds when struck with a thin stick. Unlike string instruments used in classical music, however, they do not have a built-in resonator, although resonators may be made to work with the bow in a number of ways.

— Freebase

Bow

Bow

bow, n. the general name for the stem and forepart of a ship, or that which cuts the water—often used in pl., the ship being considered to have starboard and port bows, meeting at the stem.—ns. Bow′er, Bow′er-anch′or, an anchor at the bow or forepart of a ship—usually two, the best-bower and the small-bower; Bow′-oar, the oar nearest the bow.—A bold, or bluff, bow, a broad bow; A lean bow, a narrow one.—On the bow, within 45° of the point right ahead.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bow tie

Bow tie

The bow tie is a type of men's necktie. It consists of a ribbon of fabric tied around the collar in a symmetrical manner such that the two opposite ends form loops. Ready-tied bow ties are available, in which the distinctive bow is sewn and a band goes around the neck and clips to secure. Some "clip-ons" dispense with the band altogether, instead clipping to the collar. The traditional bow tie, consisting of a strip of cloth which the wearer has to tie by hand, may be known as a "self-tie," "tie-it-yourself," or "freestyle" bow tie to distinguish it from these. Bow ties may be made of any fabric material, but most are made from silk, polyester, cotton, or a mixture of fabrics. Some fabrics are much less common for bow ties than for ordinary four-in-hand neckties. A modern bow tie is tied using a common shoelace knot.

— Freebase

Fog bow

Fog bow

A fog bow is a similar phenomenon to a rainbow; however, as its name suggests, it appears as a bow in fog rather than rain. Because of the very small size of water droplets that cause fog—smaller than 0.05 millimeters —the fog bow has only very weak colors, with a red outer edge and bluish inner edge. In many cases when the droplets are very small, fog bows appear white, and are therefore sometimes called white rainbows. This lack of color is a feature of a fog bow which distinguishes it from a glory, which has multiple pale colored rings caused by diffraction. When the droplets forming it are almost all of the same size the fog bow can have multiple inner rings, or supernumeraries, that are more strongly colored than the main bow. According to NASA: The fogbow's lack of colors is caused by the smaller water drops ... so small that the wavelength of light becomes important. Diffraction smears out colors that would be created by larger rainbow water drops ... A fog bow seen in clouds, typically from an aircraft looking downwards, is called a cloud bow. Mariners sometimes call fog bows sea-dogs.

— Freebase

Bow shock

Bow shock

A bow shock is the area between a magnetosphere and an ambient medium. For stars, this is typically the boundary between their stellar wind and the interstellar medium. In a planetary magnetosphere, the bow shock is the boundary at which the speed of the solar wind abruptly drops as a result of its approach to the magnetopause. The best-studied example of a bow shock is that occurring where the solar wind encounters the Earth's magnetopause, although bow shocks occur around all magnetized planets. The Earth's bow shock is about 17 kilometers thick and located about 90,000 kilometers from the Earth. For several decades, the solar wind from the Sun was thought to form a bow shock when it collides with the surrounding interstellar medium. This long-held belief was called into question in 2012 when data from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer found the Solar System to be moving slower through the interstellar medium than previously believed. This new finding suggests that beyond the termination shock and heliopause surrounding the Solar System there is in fact no bow shock.

— Freebase

Medicine Bow River

Medicine Bow River

The Medicine Bow River is a 167-mile-long tributary of the North Platte River, in southern Wyoming in the United States. It rises in the Snowy Range, flowing out of the North Gap Lake, in southeastern Carbon County. It flows north, past Elk Mountain, then northeast, then northwest past the town of Medicine Bow and between the Shirley Mountains to the north and the Medicine Bow Mountains to the south. Near the town of Medicine Bow the Medicine Bow River is joined by its two largest tributaries, Rock Creek and the Little Medicine Bow River. It joins the North Platte in the Seminoe Reservoir, with the lower 10 miles of the river forming an arm of the reservoir.

— Freebase

Bow Wow

Bow Wow

Shad Gregory Moss, better known by his stage name Bow Wow, is an American rapper, actor and television host. As Lil' Bow Wow, he released his first album, Beware of Dog in 2000 at age 13, which was followed by Doggy Bag 2001. In 2003, Bow Wow released his third album Unleashed, which was the first album released without using Lil' in his name. Bow Wow made his first movie appearance in All About the Benjamins, in 2002 as a cameo. In the same year, Bow Wow made his debut as the lead role in Like Mike. He later began to undertake lead roles in movies, such as Johnson Family Vacation in 2004 and Roll Bounce in 2005. He also played a supporting role in the film The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift in 2006. Bow Wow also appeared in five episodes of the television series Entourage.

— Freebase

Bow Street

Bow Street

Bow Street is a thoroughfare in Covent Garden, Westminster, London. It features as one of the streets on the standard London Monopoly board. The area around Bow Street was developed by Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford in the 1630s. Oliver Cromwell moved to Bow Street in 1645. Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford was born there in 1661. No. 4 served as a magistrates' court from 1739 and the Bow Street Runners were founded there by Henry Fielding in the 1740s. When the Metropolitan Police Service was established in 1829, a station house was sited at numbers 25 and 27. The former Bow Street Magistrates' Court and police station was completed in 1881 and closed in 2006. The building is to be converted into a boutique hotel. Bow Street is also the site of the Royal Opera House Covent Garden.

— Freebase

Chase gun

Chase gun

A chase gun, usually distinguished as bow chaser and stern chaser was a cannon mounted in the bow or stern of a sailing ship. They were used to attempt to slow down a ship either pursuing or being pursued, typically by damaging the rigging and thereby causing the target to lose performance. Bow chasers could be regular guns brought up from the gundeck and aimed through specially cut-out ports on either side of the bowsprit, or dedicated weapons made with an unusually long bore and a relatively light ball, and mounted in the bow. Stern chasers could also be improvised, or left permanently in the cabins at the stern, covered up and used as part of the furniture. In the Age of Sail, shiphandling had been brought to a high art, and chases frequently lasted for hours or sometimes days, as each crew fine-tuned their sails to take advantage of small variations in the wind. A single lucky shot could cut through a critical line, or cause a sail to split if the wind was strong, so if the ships were within range, the best gunners on each would use their chasers to make carefully aimed and timed shots at the other. During World War II, the Royal Navy fitted bow chasers, usually QF 2-pdr pom-poms, to many Hunt-class destroyers employed escorting east coast convoys, to provide a weapon capable of dealing with E-boat attacks.

— Freebase

Bow wave

Bow wave

A bow wave is the wave that forms at the bow of a ship when it moves through the water. As the bow wave spreads out, it defines the outer limits of a ship's wake. A large bow wave slows the ship down, poses a risk to smaller boats, and in a harbor can cause damage to shore facilities and moored ships. Therefore, ship hulls are generally designed to produce as small a bow wave as possible.

— Freebase

Gorytos

Gorytos

A gorytos (Ancient Greek: γωρυτός, Latin: gorytus) is a type of leather bow-case for a short composite bow used by the Scythians in classical antiquity. They are a combination of bow case and quiver in one, and are worn on the archer's left hip with the opening tilted rearward. Many gorytos were highly decorated, and at least one surviving specimen was determined via SEM examination to be made of human skin.Some have been found in Macedonian tombs, such as the so-called "Tomb of Philip" in Vergina of the 2nd half of the 4th century BCE. They were also used by the Persians. Indo-Greeks adopted the composite bow and the gorytos as part of their mounted archery equipment from around 100 BCE, as can be seen on their coins.

— Wikipedia

Rain

Rain

rān, n. water from the clouds in drops: a shower: a fall of any substance through the atmosphere in the manner of rain.—v.i. to fall from the clouds: to drop like rain.—v.t. to pour like rain.—ns. Rain′band, a dark band in the solar spectrum; Rain′-bird, a bird, like the Rain′-crow, supposed to foretell rain by its cries and actions; Rain′bow, the brilliant-coloured bow or arch seen when rain is falling opposite the sun, called lunar rainbow when formed by the moon; Rain′bow-dart′er, the soldier-fish.—adjs. Rain′bowed, formed with, or like, a rainbow; Rain′bow-tint′ed, having tints like those of a rainbow: iridescent.—ns. Rain′bow-trout, a variety of the Californian salmon; Rain′-cham′ber, an attachment to a furnace in which the fumes of any metal are condensed; Rain′-chart, -map, a chart giving information as to the distribution of rain in any part of the world; Rain′-cloud, a cloud in meteorology called nimbus; Rain′drop, a drop of rain; Rain′fall, a fall of rain: the amount of water that falls in a given time in the form of rain; Rain′-gauge, an instrument for measuring the quantity of rain that falls; Rain′iness, the state of being rainy.—adj. Rain′less, without rain.—ns. Rain′-mak′er, -doc′tor, a sorcerer, as those of Africa, professing to bring rain; Rain′-pour, a heavy rainfall; Rain′-print, one of the small pits seen on the surfaces of some argillaceous rocks, and believed to be the impressions of raindrops.—adjs. Rain′-proof, -tight, impervious to rain.—ns. Rain′storm; Rain′-tree, the genisaro of South America; Rain′-wa′ter, water which falls in rain from the clouds.—adj. Rain′y, abounding with rain: showery.—Rain cats and dogs (see Cat).—A rainy day (fig.), a time of need or hardship: future want or need; The former and the latter rain, Palestine, the rain in spring and in autumn: rain in its season. [A.S. regn, rén, rain; Dut. and Ger. regen, Ice. regn.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. reclusive
  • B. secular
  • C. secluded
  • D. cloistral