Synonyms containing bring to light

We've found 11,530 synonyms:

Light

Light

līt, n. that which shines or is brilliant: the agent by which objects are rendered visible: the power of vision: day: dawn of day: that which gives light, as the sun, a candle: the illuminated part of a picture: means of communicating fire or light: a lighthouse: (fig.) mental or spiritual illumination: enlightenment: knowledge: public view: point of view: a conspicuous person: an aperture for admitting light: (B.) prosperity, favour.—adj. not dark: bright: whitish.—v.t. to give light to: to set fire to: to attend with a light.—v.i. to become light or bright:—pr.p. light′ing; pa.t. and pa.p. light′ed or lit.—adj. Light′able.—n. Light′-ball, a composition of saltpetre, sulphur, resin, and linseed-oil formed into a ball, and used by soldiers to give light during military operations.—n.pl. Light′-dues, tolls taken from ships in certain waters, for the maintenance of lighthouses.—ns. Light′er; Light′house, a tower-like construction exhibiting a light for indicating to vessels, when nearing a port or coasting along shore, the proximity of rocks, shoals, and other dangers; Light′house-man, Light′-keep′er, the keeper of a lighthouse.—adj. Light′less.—ns. Light′ness; Light′-room, in a man-of-war, a small room separated from the magazine by thick glass windows, and used to illuminate it: the room in a lighthouse containing the lighting apparatus; Light′-ship, a stationary ship carrying a light and serving the purpose of a lighthouse in very deep waters.—adj. Light′some, full of light.—n. Light′wave, a wave of the luminous ether.—Light of nature, intellectual perception or intuition: (theol.) man's capacity of discovering truth unaided by revelation.—Between the lights, in the twilight; Between two lights, under cover of darkness; Bring to light, to reveal; Children of light, Christians as under the illumination of the Divine light, that illumination which comes directly from God; Come to light, to be revealed; Fixed light, in lighthouses, a light which is maintained steadily without change, as opposed to a revolving light; Floating light, a light displayed at the mast-head of a lightship to show dangers to navigation; Foot, Ground, lights, a row of lights used on a stage to light up the base of a scene; Inner light, spiritual illumination, light divinely imparted; Northern lights, aurora borealis; See the light, to come into view; Stand in one's own light, to hinder one's own advantage. [A.S. leóht; Ger. licht.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Light

Light

līt, adj. not heavy: of short weight: easily suffered or performed: easily digested: not heavily armed: active: not heavily burdened: unimportant: not dense or copious or intense: gentle: gay, lively: amusing: unchaste: loose, sandy: giddy, delirious: idle, worthless.—vs.t. Light, Light′en, to make less heavy: to alleviate, cheer.—advs. Light, Light′ly (Shak.), commonly, usually.—adj. Light′-armed, armed in a manner suitable for active service.—ns. Light′er, a large open boat used in unloading and loading ships; Light′erage, price paid for unloading ships by lighters: the act of thus unloading; Light′erman.—adjs. Light′-fing′ered, light or active with one's fingers: thievish; Light′-foot, -ed, nimble, active; Light′ful (rare), cheery, happy; Light′-hand′ed, with light or dexterous touch: having little in the hand: empty-handed: insufficiently manned; Light′-head′ed, giddy in the head: delirious: thoughtless: unsteady.—n. Light′-head′edness.—adj. Light′-heart′ed, light or merry of heart: free from anxiety: cheerful.—adv. Light′-heart′edly.—n. Light′-heart′edness.—adj. Light′-heeled, swift of foot.—ns. Light′-horse, light-armed cavalry; Light′-horse′man; Light′-in′fantry, infantry lightly or not heavily armed.—adjs. Light′-legged, swift of foot; Light′-mind′ed, having a light or unsteady mind: not considerate.—ns. Light′-mind′edness; Light′ness (Shak.), light-headedness; Light′ning (Shak.), an exhilaration of the spirits; Light′-o'-love, a capricious and wanton woman: an old dance tune.—n.pl. Lights, the lungs.—adj. Light′some, light, gay, lively, cheering.—n. Light′someness.—adj. Light′-spir′ited, having a cheerful spirit.—n. Light′-weight, in sporting and especially boxing, a man or animal of a certain weight prescribed by the rules, intermediate between the middle-weight and the feather-weight: a person of little importance.—adj. Light′-winged, having light wings: volatile.—Make light of, to treat as of little consequence. [A.S. leóht; Ger. leicht, Ice. léttr; L. lĕvis.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bring

Bring

bring, v.t. to fetch: to carry: to procure: to occasion: to draw or lead:—pa.t. and pa.p. brought (brawt).—Bring about, to bring to pass, effect; Bring down, to humble; Bring forth, to give birth to, produce; Bring home, to prove, to impress; Bring in, to introduce; Bring off, to bring away, as by a boat from a ship, to rescue; Bring on, to cause to advance; Bring out, to express: to produce before the public, as a book, a play, a subscription: to introduce a young woman formally into so-called society; Bring over, to convert; Bring round, to restore from illness; Bring to, to check the course of, as a ship, by trimming the sails so as to counteract each other; Bring under, to subdue; Bring up, to rear or educate. [A.S. bringan, to carry, to bring; allied perh. to Bear.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Light cone

Light cone

A light cone is the path that a flash of light, emanating from a single event and traveling in all directions, would take through spacetime. If we imagine the light confined to a two-dimensional plane, the light from the flash spreads out in a circle after the event E occurs, and if we graph the growing circle with the vertical axis of the graph representing time, the result is a cone, known as the future light cone. The past light cone behaves like the future light cone in reverse, a circle which contracts in radius at the speed of light until it converges to a point at the exact position and time of the event E. In reality, there are three space dimensions, so the light would actually form an expanding or contracting sphere in 3D space rather than a circle in 2D, and the light cone would actually be a four-dimensional version of a cone whose cross-sections form 3D spheres, but the concept is easier to visualize with the number of spatial dimensions reduced from three to two. Because signals and other causal influences cannot travel faster than light, the light cone plays an essential role in defining the concept of causality: for a given event E, the set of events that lie on or inside the past light cone of E would also be the set of all events that could send a signal that would have time to reach E and influence it in some way. For example, at a time ten years before E, if we consider the set of all events in the past light cone of E which occur at that time, the result would be a sphere with a radius of ten light-years centered on the future position E will occur. So, any point on or inside the sphere could send a signal moving at the speed of light or slower that would have time to influence the event E, while points outside the sphere at that moment would not be able to have any causal influence on E. Likewise, the set of events that lie on or inside the future light cone of E would also be the set of events that could receive a signal sent out from the position and time of E, so the future light cone contains all the events that could potentially be causally influenced by E. Events which lie neither in the past or future light cone of E cannot influence or be influenced by E in relativity.

— Freebase

Black light

Black light

A black light, also referred to as a UV-A light, Wood's lamp, or simply ultraviolet light, is a lamp which emits long wave ultraviolet light and not much visible light. The lamp has a dark purple filter material, either on the bulb or in a separate glass filter in the lamp housing, which blocks most visible light and allows through UV, so the lamp has a dim purple glow when operating. Black light bulbs which have this filter have a lighting industry designation that includes the letters "BLB". A second type of bulb which is also called a black light produces ultraviolet but does not have the filter material, so it produces more visible light and has a blue color when operating. These are made for use in "bug zapper" insect traps and are identified by the industry designation "BL". Black light sources may be specially designed fluorescent lamps, mercury vapor lamps, light-emitting diodes, or incandescent lamps. In medicine, forensics, and some other scientific fields, such a light source is referred to as a Wood's lamp. Although many other types of lamp emit ultraviolet light with visible light, black lights are essential when UV-A light without visible light is needed, particularly in observing fluorescence, the colored glow that many substances emit when exposed to UV. Black lights are employed for decorative and artistic lighting effects, for diagnostic and therapeutic uses in medicine, for the detection of substances tagged with fluorescent dyes, rock-hunting, for the detection of counterfeit money, for the curing of plastic resins and for attracting insects. Strong sources of long-wave ultraviolet light are used in tanning beds. Although the low power UV-A emitted by black lights is not a hazard to skin or eyes and can be viewed without protection, powerful ultraviolet sources present dangers and require personal protective equipment such as goggles and gloves.

— Freebase

Light pollution

Light pollution

Light pollution, also known as photopollution or luminous pollution, is excessive, misdirected, or obtrusive artificial light. Pollution is the adding-of/added light itself, in analogy to added sound, carbon dioxide, etc. Adverse consequences are multiple; some of them may be not known yet. Scientific definitions thus include the following: ⁕Degradation of photic habitat by artificial light. ⁕Alteration of natural light levels in the outdoor environment owing to artificial light sources. ⁕Light pollution is the alteration of light levels in the outdoor environment due to man-made sources of light. Indoor light pollution is such alteration of light levels in the indoor environment due to sources of light, which compromises human health. ⁕Light pollution is the introduction by humans, directly or indirectly, of artificial light into the environment. The first three of the above four scientific definitions describe the state of the environment. The fourth one describes the process of polluting by light. Light pollution competes with starlight in the night sky for urban residents, interferes with astronomical observatories, and, like any other form of pollution, disrupts ecosystems and has adverse health effects. Light pollution can be divided into two main types:

— Freebase

Bring It On

Bring It On

Bring It On is a 2000 teen comedy film directed by Peyton Reed and Jim Rowley and written by Jessica Bendinger and Stephen White. This film was followed by four direct-to-video sequels, none of which contain any of the original cast members: Bring It On Again, which shared producers with the original, Bring It On: All or Nothing, Bring It On: In It to Win It, and Bring It On: Fight to the Finish. The plot of the film centers around Torrance Shipman, who inherits the position of captain on her high school's cheerleading squad and attempts to lead her team to a sixth national title. However, Torrance is informed by the newest team member, Missy Pantone, that she's in possession of a stolen routine. When the originators of the work vow to win, Torrance and her squad must go to different lengths in order to create an original performance. Bring It On was released in theaters in the North America on August 25, 2000. The film received mostly positive reviews, with some critics praising its light nature and humorous take on its subject and others criticizing the conventional and formulaic plot. Bring It On earned a worldwide gross of approximately $90 million, which was considered a financial success. Since its release, the film has become a cult classic.

— Freebase

Light-emitting diode

Light-emitting diode

A light-emitting diode (LED) is a two-lead semiconductor light source. It is a p–n junction diode that emits light when activated. When a suitable current is applied to the leads, electrons are able to recombine with electron holes within the device, releasing energy in the form of photons. This effect is called electroluminescence, and the color of the light (corresponding to the energy of the photon) is determined by the energy band gap of the semiconductor. LEDs are typically small (less than 1 mm2) and integrated optical components may be used to shape the radiation pattern.Appearing as practical electronic components in 1962, the earliest LEDs emitted low-intensity infrared light. Infrared LEDs are still frequently used as transmitting elements in remote-control circuits, such as those in remote controls for a wide variety of consumer electronics. The first visible-light LEDs were of low intensity and limited to red. Modern LEDs are available across the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared wavelengths, with very high brightness. Early LEDs were often used as indicator lamps for electronic devices, replacing small incandescent bulbs. They were soon packaged into numeric readouts in the form of seven-segment displays and were commonly seen in digital clocks. Recent developments have produced LEDs suitable for environmental and task lighting. LEDs have led to new displays and sensors, while their high switching rates are useful in advanced communications technology. LEDs have many advantages over incandescent light sources, including lower energy consumption, longer lifetime, improved physical robustness, smaller size, and faster switching. Light-emitting diodes are used in applications as diverse as aviation lighting, automotive headlamps, advertising, general lighting, traffic signals, camera flashes, lighted wallpaper and medical devices. They are also significantly more energy efficient and, arguably, have fewer environmental concerns linked to their disposal.Unlike a laser, the color of light emitted from an LED is neither coherent nor monochromatic, but the spectrum is narrow with respect to human vision, and for most purposes the light from a simple diode element can be regarded as functionally monochromatic.

— Wikipedia

Inner light

Inner light

Light of God, Light of Christ, Christ within, That of God, Spirit of God within us, Light within, inward light and inner light are related phrases commonly used within the Religious Society of Friends as metaphors for Christ's light shining on or in them. The inward light is a much older phrase used by early Friends to refer to Christ's light shining on them; whilst the inner light is a twentieth century doctrine of the liberal branch of the Religious Society of Friends. The doctrine of the inner light was defined by Rufus Jones, who first brought the phrase into popular use in 1904, thus: "The Inner Light is the doctrine that there is something Divine, ‘Something of God’ in the human soul". Jones argued that the doctrine of the inner light was something shared by George Fox and other early Quakers, however other Quaker theologians and historians, most notably Lewis Benson reject this viewpoint. The word light is commonly used by Christians as a metaphor for Christ, derived from many Biblical passages including John 8:12 Liberal Quakers take this idea of walking in Christ's light to refer to God's presence within a person, and to a direct and personal experience of God, although this varies to some extent between Quakers in different yearly meetings.

— Freebase

L8 SmartLight

L8 SmartLight

L8, the Smart Light, the Soundless Speaker.The L8 is a device composed of 64 LED lights on one side and a super LED light on the other. Using its Bluetooth connection and your computer or smartphone, L8 communicates everything that you want to know through light codes: Twitter messages, Facebook, e-mails, game results, outside temperature…. in other words, If exists… it can shine in L8.Additionally, it includes proximity, temperature and light sensors and will communicate to you via Bluetooth with light codes. All this, controlled from your Smartphone or PC/Mac.From a friendly mobile application, your phone mic will allow the L8 to recognize sounds and create light notifications. This way, if your doorbell rings, the oven timer goes off, or somebody is calling you home, the L8 will make you aware of it through light codes. You'll choose the uses but you'll also be able to create your owns since the programming code is open so that anyone can modify or improve it to fit their needs.Because the L8 is connected to your Smartphone or PC, it's connected to the Internet, making you aware when you receive a new email, a facebook notification or your favourite team score.Besides, its built-in sensors will let you know, at all times, what is around you and reacting to any changes. For instance, when it gets dark, the luminosity sensor will detect it and automatically increase the L8 brightness or, if somebodyopens your home door, its proximity sensor will make your L8 shine and send a message right away to your Smartphone.And, of course, with its 64 LEDs in one side and the super LED in the other, it will light your room using less power than a traditional lamp, allowing you to controlboth the brightness and color.

— CrunchBase

Compact fluorescent lamp

Compact fluorescent lamp

A compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), also called compact fluorescent light, energy-saving light, and compact fluorescent tube, is a fluorescent lamp designed to replace an incandescent light bulb; some types fit into light fixtures designed for incandescent bulbs. The lamps use a tube which is curved or folded to fit into the space of an incandescent bulb, and a compact electronic ballast in the base of the lamp. Compared to general-service incandescent lamps giving the same amount of visible light, CFLs use one-fifth to one-third the electric power, and last eight to fifteen times longer. A CFL has a higher purchase price than an incandescent lamp, but can save over five times its purchase price in electricity costs over the lamp's lifetime. Like all fluorescent lamps, CFLs contain toxic mercury which complicates their disposal. In many countries, governments have banned the disposal of CFLs together with regular garbage. These countries have established special collection systems for CFLs and other hazardous waste. The principle of operation remains the same as in other fluorescent lighting: electrons that are bound to mercury atoms are excited to states where they will radiate ultraviolet light as they return to a lower energy level; this emitted ultraviolet light is converted into visible light as it strikes the fluorescent coating (as well as into heat when absorbed by other materials such as glass). CFLs radiate a spectral power distribution that is different from that of incandescent lamps. Improved phosphor formulations have improved the perceived color of the light emitted by CFLs, such that some sources rate the best "soft white" CFLs as subjectively similar in color to standard incandescent lamps.White LED lamps now compete with CFLs for high-efficiency lighting, and General Electric is stopping production of domestic CFL lamps in favour of LEDs.

— Wikipedia

Light rail

Light rail

Light rail, light rail transit (LRT), or fast tram is a form of urban rail transit using rolling stock similar to a tramway, but operating at a higher capacity, and often on an exclusive right-of-way. There is no standard definition, but in the United States (where the terminology was devised in the 1970s from the engineering term light railway), light rail operates primarily along exclusive rights-of-way and uses either individual tramcars or multiple units coupled to form a train that is lower capacity and lower speed than a long heavy-rail passenger train or metro system.A few light rail networks tend to have characteristics closer to rapid transit or even commuter rail; some of these heavier rapid transit-like systems are referred to as light metros. Other light rail networks are tram-like in nature and partially operate on streets. Light rail systems are found throughout the world, on all inhabited continents. They have been especially popular in recent years due to their lower capital costs and increased reliability compared with heavy rail systems.

— Wikipedia

Misbah

Misbah

Misbah (Arabic: مصباح‎, romanized: Miṣbāḥ) is a Muslim Arabic name meaning "lamp" or "light". This name has originated from The Qur'an from Ayatu-n-Nur, also known as the Ayat of light, from the following verse: "God is the Light of the heavens and the earth. The parable of His light is, as it were, that of a niche containing a lamp; the lamp is [enclosed] in glass, the glass [shining] like a radiant star: [a lamp] lit from a blessed tree - an olive-tree that is neither of the east nor of the west the oil whereof [is so bright that it] would well-nigh give light [of itself] even though fire had not touched it: light upon light! God guides unto His light him that wills [to be guided]; and [to this end] God propounds parables unto men, since God [alone] has full knowledge of all things" In this verse from the Qur'an, it typically means the lantern that shows the way.

— Wikipedia

Light fixture

Light fixture

A light fixture, light fitting, or luminaire is an electrical device used to create artificial light by use of an electric lamp. All light fixtures have a fixture body and a light socket to hold the lamp and allow for its replacement. Fixtures may also have a switch to control the light. Fixtures require an electrical connection to a power source; permanent lighting may be directly wired, and moveable lamps have a plug. Light fixtures may also have other features, such as reflectors for directing the light, an aperture, an outer shell or housing for lamp alignment and protection, and an electrical ballast or power supply. A wide variety of special light fixtures are created for use in the automotive lighting industry, aerospace, marine and medicine. The use of the word "lamp" to describe light fixtures is common slang for an all-in-one luminary unit, usually portable "fixtures" such as a table lamp or desk lamp. In technical terminology, a lamp is the light source, what is typically called the light bulb.

— Freebase

Retinitis pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited, degenerative eye disease that causes severe vision impairment and often blindness. The progress of RP is not consistent. Some people will exhibit symptoms from infancy, others may not notice symptoms until later in life. Generally, the later the onset, the more rapid is the deterioration in sight. Also notice that people who do not have RP have 90 degree peripheral vision, while some people that have RP have less than 90 degree. A form of retinal dystrophy, RP is caused by abnormalities of the photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina leading to progressive sight loss. Affected individuals may experience defective light to dark, dark to light adaptation or nyctalopia, as the result of the degeneration of the peripheral visual field. Sometimes, central vision is lost first causing the person to look sidelong at objects. The effect of RP is best illustrated by comparison to a television or computer screen. The pixels of light that form the image on the screen equate to the millions of light receptors on the retina of the eye. The fewer pixels on a screen, the less distinct will be the images it will display. Fewer than 10 percent of the light receptors in the eye receive the colored, high intensity light seen in bright light or daylight conditions. These receptors are located in the center of the circular retina. The remaining 90 percent of light receptors receive gray-scale, low intensity light used for low light and night vision and are located around the periphery of the retina. RP destroys light receptors from the outside inward, from the center outward, or in sporadic patches with a corresponding reduction in the efficiency of the eye to detect light. This degeneration is progressive and has no known cure as of June 2012.

— Freebase

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