Synonyms containing cab forward

We've found 2,584 synonyms:

Footplate

Footplate

The footplate of a steam locomotive is a large metal plate that rests on top of the frames and is normally covered with wooden floorboards. It is usually the full width of the locomotive and extends from the front of the cab to the rear of cab or coal bunker just above the buffer beam. The boiler, the cab, and other superstructure elements are in turn mounted on the footplate. The footplate does extend beyond the front of the cab on some locomotives, but is then usually referd to as the "running board/plate." The footplate is where the Driver and Fireman stand in the cab to operate the locomotive, giving rise to the expression of working on the footplate for being in the cab of a steam locomotive. The part of the footplate ahead of the cab is referred to by a variety of different names.

— Freebase

Cab

Cab

kab, n. a public carriage of various sizes and shapes, with two or four wheels, drawn by one horse.—ns. Cab′by, a shortened form of Cab′man, one who drives a cab for hire; Cab′-stand, a place where cabs stand for hire; Cab′-tout, one whose business it is to call cabs.—Cabmen's shelter, a place of shelter for cabmen while waiting for hire. [Shortened from Cabriolet.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Forward exchange rate

Forward exchange rate

The forward exchange rate (also referred to as forward rate or forward price) is the exchange rate at which a bank agrees to exchange one currency for another at a future date when it enters into a forward contract with an investor. Multinational corporations, banks, and other financial institutions enter into forward contracts to take advantage of the forward rate for hedging purposes. The forward exchange rate is determined by a parity relationship among the spot exchange rate and differences in interest rates between two countries, which reflects an economic equilibrium in the foreign exchange market under which arbitrage opportunities are eliminated. When in equilibrium, and when interest rates vary across two countries, the parity condition implies that the forward rate includes a premium or discount reflecting the interest rate differential. Forward exchange rates have important theoretical implications for forecasting future spot exchange rates. Financial economists have put forth a hypothesis that the forward rate accurately predicts the future spot rate, for which empirical evidence is mixed.

— Wikipedia

Cabinet

Cabinet

kab′in-et, n. (obs.) a little cabin or hut: (Shak.) the bed or nest of a beast or bird: a small room, closet, or private apartment: a case of drawers for articles of value: a private room for consultation, esp. a king's—hence The Cabinet, a limited number of the chief ministers who govern England, being the leaders of the majority in parliament.—ns. Cab′inet-coun′cil, a council or consultation of the members of the Cabinet; Cab′inet-edi′tion (of a book), one less in size and price than a library edition, but still elegant in format; Cab′inet-mak′er, a maker of cabinets and other fine furniture; Cab′inet-phō′tograph, one of the size larger than a carte-de-visite. [Dim. of Cabin; cf. mod. Fr. cabinet.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Forward pass

Forward pass

In several forms of football a forward pass is a throwing of the ball in the direction that the offensive team is trying to move, towards the defensive team's goal line. The forward pass is one of main distinguishers between gridiron football in which the play is legal and widespread, and rugby football from which the North American games evolved, in which the play is illegal. In some football codes, such as association football, the kicked forward pass is used so ubiquitously that it is not thought of as a distinct kind of play at all. In these sports, the concept of offside is used to regulate who can be in front of the play or be nearest to the goal. However, this has not always been the case. Some earlier incarnations of football allowed unlimited forward passing, while others had strict offside rules similar to rugby. The development of the forward pass in American football shows how the game has evolved from its rugby roots into the distinctive game it is today. Illegal and experimental forward passes had been attempted as early as 1876, but the first legal forward pass in American football took place in 1906, after a change in rules. Another change in rules occurred on January 18, 1951, which established that no center, tackle, or guard could receive a forward pass. Today, the only linemen who can receive a forward pass are the ends. Current rules regulate who may throw and who may receive a forward pass, and under what circumstances, as well as how the defensive team may try to prevent a pass from being completed. The primary pass thrower is the quarterback, and statistical analysis is used to determine a quarterback's success rate at passing in various situations, as well as a team's overall success at the "passing game."

— Freebase

4-8-8-2

4-8-8-2

Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 4-8-8-2 is a locomotive with four leading wheels, two sets of eight driving wheels, and a two-wheel trailing truck. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 2DD1 French classification: 240+041 Turkish classification: 46+45 Swiss classification: 4/6+4/5 The equivalent UIC classification is refined to D1' for Mallet locomotives. A locomotive of that length must be an articulated locomotive; all had a joint between the first and second groups of driving wheels. All examples of this type were cab forwards. Normally, the leading truck sits under the smokebox and the trailing truck under the firebox. On a cab-forward the leading truck supports the firebox and the trailing truck and smokebox are at the rear next to the tender. A 4-8-8-2 is effectively a 2-8-8-4 that always runs in reverse. Although commonly called Mallets these cab-forwards were built with simple expansion cylinders. The name stuck because the original classes of Southern Pacific cab-forwards were built as compound Mallets, though these were also eventually converted to simple expansion.

— Freebase

Hansom cab

Hansom cab

The hansom cab is a kind of horse-drawn carriage designed and patented in 1834 by Joseph Hansom, an architect from York. The vehicle was developed and tested by Hansom in Hinckley, Leicestershire, England. Originally called the Hansom safety cab, it was designed to combine speed with safety, with a low centre of gravity for safe cornering. Hansom's original design was modified by John Chapman and several others to improve its practicability, but retained Hansom's name. Cab is a shortening of cabriolet, reflecting the design of the carriage. It replaced the hackney carriage as a vehicle for hire; with the introduction of clockwork mechanical taximeters to measure fares, the name became taxicab. Hansom cabs enjoyed immense popularity as they were fast, light enough to be pulled by a single horse and were agile enough to steer around horse-drawn vehicles in the notorious traffic jams of nineteenth-century London. There were up to 7500 hansom cabs in use at the height of their popularity and they quickly spread to other cities in the United Kingdom, as well as continental European cities, particularly Paris, Berlin, and St Petersburg. The cab was introduced to other British Empire cities and to the United States during the late 19th century, being most commonly used in New York.

— Freebase

2-8-8-2

2-8-8-2

. A 2-8-8-2, in the Whyte notation for describing steam locomotive wheel arrangements, is an articulated locomotive with a two-wheel leading truck, two sets of eight driving wheels, and a two-wheel trailing truck. The equivalent UIC classification is, refined to Mallet locomotives, D1'. These locomotives usually employ the Mallet principles of articulation--with the rear engine rigidly attached to the boiler and the front engine free to rotate--and compounding. The 2-8-8-2 was a design largely limited to American locomotive builders. Other equivalent classifications are: UIC classification: 1DD1 French classification: 140+041 Turkish classification: 45+45 Swiss classification: 4/5+4/5 The first 2-8-8-2 was built in 1909 by Baldwin, who sold two to the Southern Pacific Railroad, and then three each to the Union Pacific Railroad and UP-owned Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company. Baldwin conceived the type as an expansion of the 2-6-6-2 permitting a greater tractive effort. The next order for the type was from the Southern Pacific; these differed in being cab forward locomotives, so that the crew could have better visibility and breathing in the SP's long tunnels and snow sheds. They were very successful, and SP continued to order cab-forward locomotives, building an eventual fleet of 256 of numerous classes; later cab-forwards were 4-8-8-2s.

— Freebase

Forward compatibility

Forward compatibility

Forward compatibility or upward compatibility is a compatibility concept for systems design, as is backward compatibility. Forward compatibility aims at the ability of a design to gracefully accept input intended for later versions of itself. The concept can be applied to entire systems, electrical interfaces, telecommunication signals, data communication protocols, file formats, and computer programming languages. A standard supports forward compatibility if older product versions can receive, read, view, play or execute the new standard. The applicability of a forward compatible system with new versions requires not only the respecting of the older version by the designers of the newer version but additionally some agreement on future design features with the design freeze of current versions. The introduction of a forward compatible technology implies that old devices partly can understand data generated by new devices. Although the concepts of forward compatibility and extensibility are similar, they are not the same. A forward compatible design can accept data from a future version of itself and pick out the "known" part of the data. An example is a text-only word processor ignoring picture data from a future version. An extensible design is one that can be upgraded to fully handle the new data in the newer input format. An example is a text-only word processor that can be upgraded to handle picture data.

— Freebase

Forward contract

Forward contract

In finance, a forward contract or simply a forward is a non-standardized contract between two parties to buy or to sell an asset at a specified future time at a price agreed upon today. This is in contrast to a spot contract, which is an agreement to buy or sell an asset today. The party agreeing to buy the underlying asset in the future assumes a long position, and the party agreeing to sell the asset in the future assumes a short position. The price agreed upon is called the delivery price, which is equal to the forward price at the time the contract is entered into. The price of the underlying instrument, in whatever form, is paid before control of the instrument changes. This is one of the many forms of buy/sell orders where the time and date of trade is not the same as the value date where the securities themselves are exchanged. The forward price of such a contract is commonly contrasted with the spot price, which is the price at which the asset changes hands on the spot date. The difference between the spot and the forward price is the forward premium or forward discount, generally considered in the form of a profit, or loss, by the purchasing party. Forwards, like other derivative securities, can be used to hedge risk, as a means of speculation, or to allow a party to take advantage of a quality of the underlying instrument which is time-sensitive.

— Freebase

Herdic

Herdic

A herdic is a type of horse-drawn carriage, used as an omnibus, invented by Peter Herdic of Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania in 1881. A predecessor of the taxicab, the herdic was a small two wheeled carriage that had side seats and an entrance at the back. The major improvements over previous types of carriage were in the springs, the way the body was mounted on the springs, and the manner in which the axles, springs, body and shaft were connected. Herdics were designed as passenger vehicles, and, in particular, for use in public transportation. Their low entry made it easy for passengers to enter and exit the cars. The first herdic cabs carried up to eight passengers. The earliest herdics were painted bright yellow and quickly acquired the canary nickname. Each cab was small enough to move freely through the city streets of Williamsport and leave its passengers at the curb instead of the middle of the street was other modes of public transportation were forced to do. Peter Herdic had moderate success with his cab and it was soon adopted in the cities of Boston, Philadelphia, New York, Washington, D.C., and numerous other cities. The herdic cab was in service in Washington as late as 1918

— Freebase

Forward price

Forward price

The forward price (or sometimes forward rate) is the agreed upon price of an asset in a forward contract. Using the rational pricing assumption, for a forward contract on an underlying asset that is tradeable, we can express the forward price in terms of the spot price and any dividends. For forwards on non-tradeables, pricing the forward may be a complex task.

— Wikipedia

Forward chaining

Forward chaining

Forward chaining (or forward reasoning) is one of the two main methods of reasoning when using an inference engine and can be described logically as repeated application of modus ponens. Forward chaining is a popular implementation strategy for expert systems, business and production rule systems. The opposite of forward chaining is backward chaining. Forward chaining starts with the available data and uses inference rules to extract more data (from an end user, for example) until a goal is reached. An inference engine using forward chaining searches the inference rules until it finds one where the antecedent (If clause) is known to be true. When such a rule is found, the engine can conclude, or infer, the consequent (Then clause), resulting in the addition of new information to its data.Inference engines will iterate through this process until a goal is reached.

— Wikipedia

Progress

Progress

prog′res, n. a going forward or onward: advance: improvement of any kind: proficiency: course: passage from place to place: procession: a journey of state: a circuit.—v.i. Prōgress′, to go forward: to make progress: to grow better: to proceed: to advance: to improve.—v.t. (Shak.) to move or push forward.—n. Prōgres′sion, motion onward: act or state of moving onward: progress: regular and gradual advance: increase or decrease of numbers or magnitudes according to a fixed law: (mus.) a regular succession of chords or the movements of the parts in harmony.—adj. Prōgres′sional.—ns. Prōgres′sionist, Prog′ressist, one who believes in the progress of society and its future perfection: one who believes in the development of animals and plants from one simple form.—adj. Prōgress′ive, progressing or moving forward: advancing gradually: improving.—n. one in favour of reform.—adv. Prōgress′ively.—n. Prōgress′iveness.—Arithmetical progression (see Arithmetic); Geometrical progression, a series of numbers or quantities in which each succeeding one is produced by multiplying or dividing the preceding one by a fixed number or quantity, as 1, 4, 16, 64, &c., or 18, 6, 2; Harmonic progression (see Harmonic); Musical progression, the regular succession of chords or the movement of the parts of a musical composition in harmony, where the key continues unchanged. [Fr.,—L. progressusprogredi, to go forwardpro, forward, gradi, to go.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Project

Project

prō-jekt′, v.t. to throw out or forward: to cast forward in the mind: to contrive or devise: to exhibit (as in a mirror): to draw straight lines from a fixed point through every point of any body or figure, and let these fall upon a surface so as to form the points of a new figure: to exhibit in relief.—v.i. to shoot forward: to jut out: to be prominent.—adj. Projec′tile, projecting or throwing forward: impelling or impelled forward: that can be thrust forward.—n. a body projected by force, esp. through the air: a cannon or rifle ball.—adj. Projec′ting.—n. Projec′tion, the act of projecting: that which juts out: a plan or design: a delineation: a representation of any object on a plane, esp. (geom.) the earth's surface: (alch.) the act of throwing anything into a crucible, hence the act or result of transmutation of metals: the crisis of any process, esp. a culinary process.—adj. Projec′tive, produced by projection: (geom.) capable, as two plane figures, of being derived from one another by a number of projections and sections.—ns. Projectiv′ity; Project′ment (rare), design; Projec′tor, one who projects or forms schemes: a parabolic mirror: a camera for throwing an image on a screen; Projec′ture, a jutting out beyond the main line or surface.—Mercator's projection, a map of the world with meridian lines which are straight and parallel, and with parallels of latitude at distances from each other, increasing towards the poles, invented by the Flemish cosmographer, Mercator, in 1550.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. harmlessly
  • B. noxiously
  • C. harmfully
  • D. detrimentally