Synonyms containing catch napping Page #2

We've found 1,106 synonyms:

Inemuri

Inemuri

Inemuri is the Japanese practice of sleeping on the job. It literally means, "sleeping while present". It is a way for an employee to show how committed they are to working. In other words, the employee spends so much time working that they sleep too little at home and have to do inemuri. Some people even fake inemuri, so that their bosses believe they are working hard. Unwritten rules apply to inemuri, including who is allowed to do it - only those high up or low down in a company - and how it is performed - the person is supposed to remain upright to show they are still socially engaged in some way. Tests by NASA have concluded that napping during the day can improve working memory a fundamental ability critical to performing complex work.

— Freebase

fish

fish

catch or try to catch fish or shellfish

— Princeton's WordNet

take

take

To catch the ball; especially for the wicket-keeper to catch the ball after the batsman has missed or edged it.

— Wiktionary

detent

detent

That which locks or unlocks a movement; a catch, pawl, or dog; especially, in clockwork, the catch which locks and unlocks the wheelwork in striking.

— Wiktionary

furcula

furcula

The (two-pronged,) forked, somewhat tail-like organ held bent forward and secured by a catch beneath most species of Collembola (springtails), with which they jump by releasing the catch abruptly when alarmed.

— Wiktionary

ride down

ride down

to catch or catch up with [someone] by chasing on horseback

— Wiktionary

Bolter

Bolter

In naval aviation, a bolter occurs when an aircraft attempting an arrested landing on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier touches down, but fails to catch an arrestor cable and come to a stop. Bolter aircraft accelerate at full throttle and become airborne in order to go around to re-attempt the landing. Prior to the development of the angled flight deck, aircraft carrier landing areas ran along the axis of the ship. If an aircraft failed to catch an arrestor cable on the aft of the ship, it would still need to be stopped prior to hitting aircraft spotted on the forward half of the deck. With aircraft spotted on the forward half of the flight deck, there was not enough room for an aircraft to become airborne again after missing the arrestor wires. Bringing an aircraft that failed to engage an arrestor cable to a stop was accomplished with either a wire "barrier", rigged amidships and raised to catch the aircraft's landing gear, or a net "barricade" that would engage the aircraft's wings. Either method often resulted in damage to the aircraft and required time to disengage. The introduction of jet aircraft for carrier operations in the early 1950s, with their greater mass and higher approach speeds, exacerbated the problem.

— Freebase

Grappling hook

Grappling hook

A grappling hook is a device with multiple hooks, attached to a rope; it is thrown, dropped, sunk, projected, or fastened directly by hand to where at least one hook may catch and hold. Generally, grappling hooks are used to temporarily secure one end of a rope. They may also be used to dredge for submerged objects. Historically, grappling hooks were used in naval warfare to catch ship rigging so that it could be boarded. A common design has a central shaft with a hole at the shaft base to attach the rope, and three equally spaced hooks at the end, arranged that at least one is likely to catch on some protuberance of the target. Some modern designs feature folding hooks to resist unwanted attachment. Most grappling hooks are thrown by hand, but some used in rescue work are propelled by compressed air, mortar or a rocket. Grappling hooks are used by combat engineers breaching tactical obstacles. The grappling hook is launched in front of an obstacle and dragged backwards to detonate trip-wire-fused land mines, and can be hooked on wire obstacles and pulled to set off booby traps on the wire. Two tools are available for this purpose; the rifle-launched grapnel, a single-use grappling hook placed on the end of an M4/M16 rifle, or the crossbow launched version. A grapple can clear up to 99% of the trip-wires in a single pass.

— Freebase

Trust fall

Trust fall

A trust fall is a purported trust-building game often conducted as a group exercise in which a person deliberately allows themselves to fall, relying on the other members of the group to catch the person. There are many variants of the trust fall. For instance, in one type, the group stands in a circle, with one person in the middle with arms folded against his chest and falls in various directions, being pushed by the group back to a standing position before falling again. In another variant, a person stands on an elevated position and relying on multiple people to catch the person. This variant is potentially more dangerous and therefore it is all the more crucial to have the rest of the group in position and ready to catch him before he steps onto the platform. This type of trust fall was shown in the film Mean Girls during the "attitude makeover" scene, and in season 4 of HBO drama The Wire. Trust falls are frequently seen in ropes courses. Despite its name, there is no scientific evidence that the game builds any trust among participants. In 2010, a Comedy Central show named Tosh.0 introduced a new variant of trust falls known as "surprise trust falls", which involved the host Daniel Tosh approaching random people in public, shouting "Trust Fall!" and falling into said person. Two years later, Blake Grigsby revives the surprise trust fall concept with a viral YouTube video called "Trust Fall Attack".

— Freebase

Halt and Catch Fire

Halt and Catch Fire

Halt and Catch Fire, known by the mnemonic HCF, refers to several computer machine code instructions that cause the CPU to cease meaningful operation. The expression "catch fire" is intended as a joke; the CPU does not catch fire. It is also occasionally referred to as "SDI" for "Self Destruct Immediate".

— Freebase

Catch the Sun

Catch the Sun

"Catch the Sun" is the second single from Doves' debut studio album Lost Souls. The single was released on 29 May 2000 in the UK on 2 CDs and 10" vinyl, and charted at #32 on the UK Singles Chart. The psychedelic, kaleidoscopic music video for "Catch the Sun" was directed by Sophie Muller. Jamie Cullum covered "Catch the Sun" on his album Catching Tales. "Down to Sea" is an early demo of "Sea Song." The B-sides for CD2 are songs from Doves' previous incarnation as Sub Sub. The versions of "Crunch" and "Lost In Watts" differ slightly from those found on Sub Sub's album Delta Tapes. "Crunch" is an edit, and "Lost in Watts" is an alternate mix omitting some background vocals. The B-side "Valley" features the piano riff from The Beach Boys' Smile-era songs "Do You Like Worms" and "Heroes And Villains". The song was also featured in the soundtrack of the videogame Project Gotham Racing.

— Freebase

Bird

Bird

bėrd, n. a general name for feathered animals.—v.i. to catch or snare birds.—ns. Bird′-bolt (Shak.), a short thick bolt or arrow with a blunted point, used for killing birds without piercing them; Bird′-cage, a cage or box made of wire and wood for holding birds; Bird′-call, an instrument used by fowlers to call or allure birds to them, by imitating their notes; Bird′-catch′er, one who catches birds: a fowler; Bird′-catch′ing, the art or practice of catching birds; Bird′-cher′ry, a bush bearing an astringent wild-fruit in drupes.—adj. Bird′-eyed, having eyes quick of sight, like those of a bird: quick-sighted.—ns. Bird′-fan′cier, one who has a fancy for rearing birds: one who keeps birds for sale; Bird′ing (Shak.), catching birds by means of hawks trained for the purpose; Bird′ing-piece, a fowling-piece; Bird′-lime, a sticky substance used for catching birds; Bird′-of-Par′adise, a kind of Eastern bird with splendid plumage; Bird's′-eye, a kind of tobacco; Bird's′-nest, the nest in which a bird lays her eggs and hatches her young; Bird′-spī′der, a species of large spiders which prey on small birds, found in Brazil.—adj. Bird′-wit′ted, flighty: incapable of sustained attention.—Bird's-eye view, a general view from above, as if by a bird on the wing, a representation of such, a general view or résumé of a subject; Bird's-foot trefoil, the popular name of several leguminous plants, having clusters of cylindrical pods resembling a bird's foot.—A little bird told me, I heard in a way I will not reveal. [A.S. brid, the young of a bird, a bird: either from root of Breed (bredan, to breed) or of Birth (beran, to bear).]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fang

Fang

fang, n. the tooth of a ravenous beast: a claw or talon: the venom-tooth of a serpent: (Shak.) a grip, catch.—v.t. (obs.) to seize upon, catch.—adjs. Fanged, having fangs, clutches, or anything resembling them; Fang′less, having no fangs or tusks: toothless.—Lose the fang (of a pump), to be dry, to have no water (Scot.). [A.S. fang, from fón, to seize; Ger. fangen, to catch, Dut. vangen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Rat

Rat

rat, n. an animal of the genus Mus, larger and more destructive than the mouse: a renegade, turncoat: a workman who accepts lower than the authorised wages, who declines to join in a strike, or who takes a striker's work: a roll of anything used to puff out the hair which is turned over it.—v.i. (coll.) to desert one's party and join their opponents for gain or power: to take lower than current wages, to refuse to join in a strike, to take a striker's place:—pr.p. rat′ting; pa.p. and pa.t. rat′ted.ns. Rat′-catch′er, one whose business it is to catch rats; Rat′-catch′ing; Rat′-hole (print.), a pigeon-hole; Rat′-pit, an enclosure where rats are killed; Rat′-poi′son, a preparation of arsenic; Rat's′-bane, poison for rats: arsenious acid; Rat′-tail, an excrescence growing on a horse's leg.—adj. Rat′-tailed, having a tail like a rat.—ns. Rat′ter, a terrier which catches rats; Rat′tery, apostasy; Rat′ting, deserting one's principles: working for less than the usual prices: setting a dog to kill rats in a pit; Rat′-trap, a trap for catching rats.—Rat-tailed larva, the larva of certain syrphid flies.—Smell a rat, to have a suspicion. [A.S. ræt; Ger. ratte.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Snap

Snap

snap, v.t. to break short or at once: to bite, or catch at suddenly: to crack: to interrupt sharply (often with up): to shut with a sharp sound: to take an instantaneous photograph of, esp. with a hand camera.—v.i. to break short: to try to bite: to utter sharp words (with at): to flash:—pr.p. snap′ping; pa.t. and pa.p. snapped.—n. act of snapping, or the noise made by it: a small catch or lock: a hasty repast, a snack: a crack, the spring-catch of a bracelet, &c., an earring: a crisp kind of gingerbread nut or cake: crispness, pithiness, epigrammatic point or force: vigour, energy: (slang) a brief theatrical engagement, an easy and profitable place or task: a sharper, a cheat: a riveter's tool, also a glass-moulder's tool: the act of taking a snapshot.—adj. sudden, unpremeditated, without preparation.—ns. Snap′dragon, a plant, so called because the lower lip of the corolla when parted shuts with a snap like a dragon's jaw: a Christmas pastime in which raisins are snatched out of a dish in which brandy is burning, in a room otherwise dark—also the raisins so taken; Snap′per; Snap′per-up (Shak.), one who snaps up; Snap′ping-tur′tle, a large fresh-water tortoise of the United States—from its habit of snapping at things.—adjs. Snap′pish, Snap′py, inclined to snap: eager to bite: sharp in reply.—adv. Snap′pishly, in a snappish manner: peevishly: tartly.—ns. Snap′pishness; Snap′shot, an instantaneous photograph. [Dut. snappen, to snap; Ger. schnappen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
An antonym for the term "ductile"
  • A. fictile
  • B. intractable
  • C. pliable
  • D. malleable