Synonyms containing catch napping Page #5

We've found 1,106 synonyms:

Lacrosse

Lacrosse

Lacrosse is a team sport of Native American origin played using a small rubber ball and a long-handled stick called a crosse or lacrosse stick. It is a contact sport which requires padding such as shoulder pads, gloves, helmets, elbow pads, and sometimes rib guards. The head of the lacrosse stick is strung with loose mesh designed to catch and hold the lacrosse ball and can also be strung with hard mesh. There are many different styles like Canadian mesh, rocket pocket and normal mesh. Offensively, the objective of the game is to score by shooting the ball into an opponent's goal, using the lacrosse stick to catch, carry, and pass the ball to do so. Defensively, the objective is to keep the opposing team from scoring and to dispossess them of the ball through the use of stick checking and body contact or positioning. The sport has four major types: men's field lacrosse, women's lacrosse, box lacrosse and intercrosse.

— Freebase

Harpoon

Harpoon

A harpoon is a long spear-like instrument used in fishing to catch fish or large marine mammals such as whales. It accomplishes this task by impaling the target animal, allowing the fishermen to use a rope or chain attached to the butt of the projectile to catch the animal. A harpoon can also be used as a weapon.

— Freebase

Dumper

Dumper

A dumper is a vehicle designed for carrying bulk material, often on building sites. Dumpers are distinguished from dump trucks by configuration: a dumper is usually an open 4-wheeled vehicle with the load skip in front of the driver, while a dump truck has its cab in front of the load. The skip can tip to dump the load; this is where the name "dumper" comes from. They are normally diesel powered. A towing eye is fitted for secondary use as a site tractor. Dumpers with rubber tracks are used in special circumstances and are popular in some countries. Early dumpers had a payload of about a ton and were 2-wheel drive, driving on the front axle and steered at the back wheels. The single cylinder diesel engine was started by hand cranking. The steering wheel turned the back wheels, not front. Having neither electrics nor hydraulics there was not much to go wrong. The skip was secured by a catch by the driver's feet. When the catch is released, the skip tips under the weight of its contents at pivot points below, and after being emptied is raised by hand. Modern dumpers have payloads of up to 10 tonnes and usually steer by articulating at the middle of the chassis. They have multi-cylinder diesel engines, some turbocharged, electric start and hydraulics for tipping and steering and are more expensive to make and operate. An A-frame known as a ROPS frame, may be fitted over the seat to protect the driver if the dumper rolls over. Some dumpers have FOPS as well. Lifting skips are available for discharging above ground level. In the 1990s dumpers with swivel skips, which could be rotated to tip sideways, became popular, especially for working in narrow sites such as road works. Dumpers are the most common cause of accidents involving construction plant.

— Freebase

Mousetrap

Mousetrap

A mousetrap is a specialized type of animal trap designed primarily to catch mice; however, it may also trap other small animals. Mousetraps are usually set in an indoor location where there is a suspected infestation of rodents. There are various types of mousetrap, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Larger traps are designed to catch other species of animals; such as rats, squirrels, other small rodents, or other animals.

— Freebase

Pteropus

Pteropus

Bats of the genus Pteropus, belonging to the megabat suborder, Megachiroptera, are the largest bats in the world. They are commonly known as the fruit bats or flying foxes among other colloquial names. They live in the tropics and subtropics of Asia, Australia, islands off East Africa, and a number of remote oceanic islands in both the Indian and Pacific Oceans. There are at least 60 extant species in this genus. The oldest ancestors of the genus Pteropus to be unearthed appear in the fossil record almost exactly as they are today, the only notable differences being early flight adaptations such as a tail for stabilizing. The oldest megachiropteran is dated at around 35 million years ago, but the preceding gap in the fossil record makes their true lineage unknown. Characteristically, all species of flying foxes only feed on nectar, blossom, pollen, and fruit, which explains their limited tropical distribution. They do not possess echolocation, a feature which helps the other suborder of bats, the microbats, locate and catch prey such as insects in mid-air. Instead, smell and eyesight are very well-developed in flying foxes. Feeding ranges can reach up to 40 miles. When it locates food, the flying fox "crashes" into foliage and grabs for it. It may also attempt to catch hold of a branch with its hind feet, then swing upside down – once attached and hanging, the fox draws food to its mouth with one of its hind feet or with the clawed thumbs at the top of its wings.

— Freebase

Catch-22

Catch-22

Catch-22 is a satirical and somewhat historical novel by the American author Joseph Heller. He began writing it in 1953, and the novel was first published in 1961. It is set during World War II in 1943 and is frequently cited as one of the great literary works of the twentieth century. It uses a distinctive non-chronological third-person omniscient narration, describing events from different characters' points of view and out of sequence so that the time line develops along with the plot. The novel follows Captain John Yossarian, a U.S. Army Air Forces B-25 bombardier. Most of the events in the book occur while the fictional 256th squadron is based on the island of Pianosa, in the Mediterranean Sea west of Italy. The novel looks into the experiences of Yossarian and the other airmen in the camp, and their attempts to keep their sanity in order to fulfill their service requirements, so that they can return home. The phrase "Catch-22", "a problematic situation for which the only solution is denied by a circumstance inherent in the problem or by a rule," has entered the English language.

— Freebase

Western Kingbird

Western Kingbird

The Western Kingbird is a large tyrant flycatcher. Adults are grey-olive on the upperparts with a grey head and a dark line through the eyes; the underparts are light becoming light orange-yellow on the lower breast and belly. They have a long black tail with white outer feathers. Western kingbirds also have a reddish crown that they only display during courtship and confrontations with other species. Their breeding habitat is open areas in western North America. They make a sturdy cup nest in a tree or shrub, sometimes on top of a pole or other man-made structure. The name kingbird is derived from their "take-charge" behaviour. These birds aggressively defend their territory, even against much larger birds such as hawks. These birds migrate in flocks to Florida and the Pacific coast of southern Mexico and Central America. They wait on an open perch and fly out to catch insects in flight, sometimes hovering and then dropping to catch food on the ground. They also eat berries. The song is a squeaky chatter, sometimes compared to a dog's squeaky toy. The call is a sharp loud whit. Occasionally sings before sunrise.

— Freebase

Ictiobus

Ictiobus

Ictiobus, also known as buffalo fish, is a genus of freshwater fish common in the United States, but also found in Canada, Mexico and Guatemala. It is sometimes mistaken for carp because of its flat face and large, silver scales running along the body, though it lacks the whisker-like mouth appendages common to carp. Buffalo fish live in most types of freshwater bodies where panfish are found, such as ponds, creeks, rivers, and lakes. Ictiobus was caught by the Lewis and Clark Expedition. From a fishermen's point of view, however, the buffalo fish is not a popular game fish because it is difficult to catch. Yet, once on the line, it can put up a good fight. The preferred method of catch is by the use of gill nets. These nets are set by hand during the night where it is most effective. It is an affordable fish that is popular in the southern U.S. including the Memphis and St. Louis markets.

— Freebase

Warning track

Warning track

The warning track is the part of the baseball field that is closest to the wall or fence and is typically made of dirt, instead of grass or artificial turf like most of the field. It runs parallel to the ballpark's wall and looks like a running track. The change of terrain from grass to dirt serves as a "warning" for fielders trying to make a deep catch that they are running out of room, since it is often difficult for the fielder to keep his eye on a fly ball while keeping track of his position relative to the wall. Despite the warning track's presence, it is common to see outfielders crash into the wall to make a catch, due either to a desire to field the play regardless of the outcome or because they fail to register the warning. The term "warning track" comes from Old Yankee Stadium, where an actual running track was built for the use of track and field events. This also helped outfielders know when they were approaching the wall, and soon every ballpark was using one. The average length of the warning track is 690 ft while the width is 15 ft.

— Freebase

Kickoff

Kickoff

A kickoff is a method of starting a drive in American football and Canadian football. Typically, a kickoff consists of one team – the "kicking team" – kicking the ball to the opposing team – the "receiving team". The receiving team is then entitled to return the ball, i.e., attempt to advance it towards the kicking team's end zone, until the player with the ball is tackled by the kicking team, goes out of bounds, or scores a touchdown. Kickoffs take place at the start of each half of play and any overtime period, and after each scoring play. Common variants on the typical kickoff format include the onside kick, in which the kicking team attempts to regain possession of the ball; a touchback, which may occur if the ball is kicked into the receiving team's end zone; or a fair catch, in which a player on the receiving team waives his entitlement to attempt a return in exchange for a chance to catch the ball without interference from the kicking team. Additionally, penalties exist for various infractions such as a player violating his position restrictions prior to the kick, or if the ball goes out of bounds before touching a player.

— Freebase

Burke's Barrage

Burke's Barrage

Burke's Barrage is a toss juggling pattern named after its inventor Ken Burke. It is quite popular among jugglers due to the impressive arm moves, but it's not so hard to master, compared to the Rubenstein's Revenge for example. The pattern is based on the siteswap sequence 423. This sequence represents the height of the three basic throws in the pattern. The 3 represents a ball thrown at the typical height of a 3-ball cascade. The 4 represents a ball thrown at the height of a four-ball fountain. This ball stays on one side of the body while in the air and is thrown and caught by the same hand. Lastly, the 2 does not represent a throw, but circular motion of the hand carrying a ball through the pattern. The idea is to throw the 4, then the 3, and when you catch the first ball you throw you make a big circle around the ball on the 3. Each 4 should be caught with a claw catch. In other words, each 4 throw is snatched with the palm facing down. The palm is turned to face up as the hand rotates around in its circle motion. When Ken Burke himself juggles it, the circular carry passes between the 3 and the other 4, rather than around both of them. It has nothing to do with Luke Burrage, although he invented a juggling trick quite similar to Burke's Barrage, which he named Burke's Burrage. It is the same as a Burke's Barrage, but instead of making a big circle around the ball on the 3, you just put it apart on the side, which makes a more geometrical impression.

— Freebase

Snaplock

Snaplock

A Snaplock is a particular type of mechanism for firing a gun. A snaplock ignites the weapon's propellant by means of sparks produced when a spring-powered cock strikes a flint down on to a piece of hardened steel. The snaplock is therefore similar to the snaphaunce and the later flintlock. In all snaplocks, the flint is held in a clamp at the end of a bent lever called the cock. When the gun is "cocked", the cock is held back, against the pressure of a spring, by a catch which is part of the trigger mechanism. When the trigger is pulled, the catch is released and the spring moves the cock rapidly forwards. The flint strikes a curved plate of hardened steel, called the "steel". The flint strikes from the steel a shower of white hot steel shavings which fall towards the priming powder held in the flash pan. The flash from the pan's ignited primer travels through the touch hole into the firing chamber at the rear of the barrel, and ignites the main charge of gunpowder. Before the weapon is fired, the pan has a closed cover: the mechanism for opening this cover can affect whether the weapon is classed as a snaplock. In fact, the term Snaplock may be used in three ways

— Freebase

Torpedo punt

Torpedo punt

The torpedo punt is a type of punt kick implemented in Rugby League, Rugby Union, Australian rules football, and more generally with an ellipsoidal football. The torpedo punt is the longest type of punt kick. In flight, the ball spins about its long axis, instead of end over end or not at all, making the flight of the ball more aerodynamic, but more difficult to catch. The pointier ends make the ball easier to catch in American Football. With extra distance, this type of kick is also more difficult to accurately judge depth. If kicked correctly, an Australian football can travel up to 80 metres, while a normal punt will travel slightly less far. In rugby codes, the skill was once frequently applied as clearing kicks by players in the backline. Its use in the rugby codes in similarly related almost entirely to clearing and distance kicks from a team's own territory. In Australian rules football, the kick has become less common since the 1980s, as modern tactics have meant that accuracy has become typically more important than distance in field kicking; as such, coaches now prefer the use of the drop punt, and discouraging the use of the torpedo in general field play as a comparatively low percentage kick. The kick may still be seen when a player needs additional distance.

— Freebase

Hexagrammidae

Hexagrammidae

The family of marine fishes Hexagrammidae incorporates the greenlings. These fish are found on the continental shelf in the temperate or subarctic waters of the North Pacific. They are a well-known family in the littoral zone from southern California north to the Aleutian Islands. The most commercially important species is the lingcod, a common food fish. Most hexagrammids are small to moderate in size, averaging around 50 cm, although the lingcod can be much larger. Like many other scorpaeniform species, they have broad, spiny pectoral, dorsal, and anal fins. They are scavengers but also catch and eat small fish and bottom-dwelling animals such as crabs. They can be found off rocky shorelines, in kelp beds, and, especially during spawning, in shallow inlets and tidepools. The kelp greenling is a popular sport fish, and although it is not commercially valuable, it is considered a delicious food catch. The lingcod is long and olive-yellow in color, and has a very large, toothy mouth. The painted greenling is smaller, brighter in color, and easily recognized by its large vertical red bands.

— Freebase

Flosser

Flosser

Flossers are anglers who use the method of "bottom bouncing" to catch fish. Their catch is mainly from the salmon species. Flossing is a controversial method, regarded by some as an unsportlike way of harvesting fish. It is also called "bottom bouncing", or "lining". The method employed uses leaders of between 10 and 25 feet with a 1 to 4 ounce lead weight called a "Bouncing Betty ". Due to angling regulations in British Columbia, Chile, Peru, and Argentina, hooks devoid of any dressing are illegal. To work with this method, fishermen often tie on long strands of green or orange wool or Corkies to their hooks. The technique of bottom bouncing is to position the long leader so that it flosses itself through the fish's mouth. The hook attached at the end of the leader then usually pierces the fish's mouth from the outside in as the weight pulls the line downstream. The fish is snagged in the mouth, this is considered by some to be unsportlike. Bottom bouncing is commonly practiced in the summer months on the Fraser River, when sockeye and chinook salmon run upstream to spawn.

— Freebase

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A synonym of "kittenish"
  • A. serious
  • B. unplayful
  • C. frisky
  • D. sober