Synonyms containing catch napping Page #6

We've found 1,106 synonyms:

Stargazy pie

Stargazy pie

Stargazy pie is a Cornish dish made of baked pilchards, along with eggs and potatoes, covered with a pastry crust. Although there are a few variations with different fish being used, the unique feature of stargazy pie is fish heads protruding through the crust, so that they appear to be gazing skyward. This allows the oils released during cooking to flow back into the pie. The dish is traditionally held to have originated from the village of Mousehole in Cornwall and is traditionally eaten during the festival of Tom Bawcock's Eve to celebrate his heroic catch during a very stormy winter. According to the modern festival, which is combined with the Mousehole village illuminations, the entire catch was baked into a huge stargazy pie, encompassing seven types of fish and saving the village from starvation. There is evidence that the festival dates back even further, to pre-Christian times. The story of Bawcock was popularised by Antonia Barber's children's book The Mousehole Cat, which featured the star-gazy pie. In 2007 contestant Mark Hix won the BBC's Great British Menu with a variant of the dish.

— Freebase

Bad Mood

Bad Mood

Bad Mood was the second album by musician Lonnie Gordon. It was published in 1993 on SBK/Capitol Records. The album is her most commercially successful to date. It was produced primarily by the group Black Box. The album includes the hit singles "Gonna Catch You", "Happening All Over Again", "Bad Mood" and "Do You Want It?." It includes a cover of Gloria Gaynor's hit "I Will Survive" as well as the ballad "Missing You." Three of its singles, "Gonna Catch You", "Bad Mood" and "Happenin' All Over Again '93", all peaked at #1 on the U.S. Dance charts.

— Freebase

Doglock

Doglock

Doglock refers to the lock that preceded the 'true' flintlock in fusils, muskets, and pistols in the 17th century. Commonly used throughout Europe in the 17th century, it gained popular favor in the British and Dutch military. A doglock carbine was the principal weapon of the harquebusier, the most numerous type of cavalry in the armies of the Thirty Years War and English Civil War era. Much like the later flintlock devices it contained the flint, frizzen, and pan, yet had an external catch as a half cock safety, known as the "dog". This type of lock had no internal,half-cock loading position as the later flintlock mechanism contained. To load a firearm with a dog lock, the cock was secured with the external dog, preventing it from moving forward to strike the frizzen and begin the firing sequence. The user could then safely load the musket or pistol. To fire, the cock was moved to the full-cock position, which caused the dog to fall backward and no longer prevent the lock from firing. a pull of the trigger would then fire the piece. This fell out of favor with the British before 1720. Later flintlocks would contain no such catch, as the half-cock position had been created with the internal parts of the lock.

— Freebase

Fly tying

Fly tying

Fly tying is the process of producing an artificial fly to be used by anglers to catch fish by fly fishing. Helen Shaw, an American professional fly tyer, defined it as the "simple process of binding various materials to a hook with thread" in Fly-Tying. E. C. Gregg, in the introduction to How To Tie Flies, elevated the task to an Art, "The object of this book will be throughout its entirety to teach in a practical manner the Art of Fly Tying in all its branches." At the other end is the apparent view of A. K. Best, in Production Fly Tying, suggests practical ways to streamline tying technique. Best emphasizes that fly tying is also a science rooted in careful observation of fish and their prey, and then designing and tying artificial flies to replicate that prey to catch fish. One of the first and foremost of these efforts was by Preston Jennings, in his classic: A Book of Trout Flies. Fly tying requires some basic equipment, the appropriate materials for the fly pattern being tied and a fly pattern to follow or replicate. Fly tying equipment enables the fly tyer to efficiently and effectively assemble and secure the materials on the hook. Flying materials were originally limited to various furs, feathers, threads and hooks. Today there many different types of natural and synthetic materials used to tie flies. Fly patterns represent the “recipe” required to create the fly—what hook size types to use, what materials are to be used, what colors, in what sequence and by what methods are they assembled on the hook. These are the elements of fly patterns. Of patterns, there are thousands.

— Freebase

Freestyle wrestling

Freestyle wrestling

Freestyle wrestling is a style of amateur wrestling that is practiced throughout the world. Along with Greco-Roman, it is one of the two styles of wrestling contested in the Olympic games. It is, along with track and field, one of the oldest organized sports in history. American high school and college wrestling is conducted under different rules and is termed scholastic and collegiate wrestling. Freestyle wrestling, like collegiate wrestling, has its greatest origins in catch-as-catch-can wrestling and, in both styles, the ultimate goal is to throw and pin your opponent to the mat, which results in an immediate win. Freestyle and collegiate wrestling, unlike Greco-Roman, also both allow the use of the wrestler's or his opponent's legs in offense and defense. Freestyle wrestling is the most complete style of standup wrestling and brings together traditional wrestling, judo and sambo techniques. According to the International Federation of Associated Wrestling Styles, freestyle wrestling is one of the four main forms of amateur competitive wrestling that are practiced internationally today. Others of the main forms of wrestling are Greco-Roman and Grappling. The Executive Board of the International Olympic Committee has recommended dropping wrestling as a sport from the 2020 Olympic Games.

— Freebase

Recreational fishing

Recreational fishing

Recreational fishing, also called sport fishing, is fishing for pleasure or competition. It can be contrasted with commercial fishing, which is fishing for profit, or subsistence fishing, which is fishing for survival. The most common form of recreational fishing is done with a rod, reel, line, hooks and any one of a wide range of baits. Other devices, commonly referred to as terminal tackle, are also used to affect or complement the presentation of the bait to the targeted fish. Some examples of terminal tackle include weights, floats, and swivels. Lures are frequently used in place of bait. Some hobbyists make handmade tackle themselves, including plastic lures and artificial flies. The practice of catching or attempting to catch fish with a hook is known as angling. Big-game fishing is conducted from boats to catch large open-water species such as tuna, sharks and marlin. Noodling and trout tickling are also recreational activities. One method of growing popularity is kayak fishing. Kayaks are stealthy and allow anglers to reach areas not fishable from land or by conventional boat. In addition, fishing from kayaks is regarded by some as an effort to level the playing field, to a degree, with their quarry and/or to challenge their angling abilities further by bringing an additional level of complexity to their sport. Historically, sport fishing has attracted greater interest among males. Women and girls represent barely 10% of the angling community, yet those who do enter the sport are often extremely successful, and at the highest levels of competitive angling, their results are comparable to those of their male counterparts.

— Freebase

Discards

Discards

Discards are the portion of a catch of fish which is not retained on board during commercial fishing operations and is returned, often dead or dying, to the sea. The practice of discarding is driven by economic and political factors; fish which are discarded are often unmarketable species, individuals which are below minimum landing sizes and catches of species which fishermen are not allowed to land, for instance due to quota restrictions. Discards form part of the bycatch of a fishing operation, although bycatch includes marketable species caught unintentionally. Discarding can be highly variable in time and space as a consequence of changing economic, sociological, environmental and biological factors. Discarding patterns are influenced by catch compositions, which in turn are determined by environmental factors, such as recruitment of small fish into the fishery, and social factors, such as quota regulation, choice of fishing gear and fishermen's behaviour. There have been numerous studies on the scale of discarding.

— Freebase

Cony

Cony

Coney, kō′ni, or kun′i, n. a rabbit: (B.) translation of Heb. shâphân, the Hyrax syriacus, or rock-badger: (obs.) an equivocal term of endearment for a woman.—n. Cō′ny-burr′ow, a rabbit-warren.—v.t. Cō′ny-catch (Shak.), to cheat.—ns. Cōny-catch′er, a cheat; Cō′ny-wool, rabbits' fur. [Prob. through O. Fr. connil, from L. cuniculus, a rabbit.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Drag

Drag

drag, v.t. to draw by force: to draw slowly: to pull roughly and violently: to explore with a drag-net or hook.—v.i. to hang so as to trail on the ground: to be forcibly drawn along: to move slowly and heavily:—pr.p. drag′ging; pa.p. dragged.—n. a net or hook for dragging along to catch things under water: a heavy harrow: a device for guiding wood to the saw: a mail-coach: a long open carriage, with transverse or side seats: a contrivance for retarding carriage-wheels in going down slopes: any obstacle to progress: an artificial scent (anise-seed, &c.) dragged on the ground for foxhounds trained to the pursuit (Drag′-hounds) to follow: (billiards) a push somewhat under the centre of the cue-ball, causing it to follow the object-ball a short way.—ns. Drag′-bar, a strong iron bar for connecting railway-carriages together—also Draw′-bar; Drag′-bolt, a strong bolt passing through the drag-bar of railway-carriages, and serving to fasten the coupling; Drag′-chain, the chain that connects engine and tender, or carriages and wagons, with one another; Drag′-man, a fisherman who uses a drag-net; Drag′-net, a net to be dragged or drawn along the bottom of water to catch fish; Drags′man, the driver of a drag or coach. [A.S. dragan; Ger. tragen. Acc. to Curtius, nowise conn. with L. trahĕre.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Field

Field

fēld, n. country or open country in general: a piece of ground enclosed for tillage or pasture: the range of any series of actions or energies: the locality of a battle: the battle itself: room for action of any kind: a wide expanse: (her.) the surface of a shield: the background on which figures are drawn: the part of a coin left unoccupied by the main device: those taking part in a hunt: all the entries collectively against which a single contestant has to compete: all the parties not individually excepted, as 'to bet on the field' in a horse-race.—v.t. at cricket and base-ball, to catch or stop and return to the fixed place.—v.i. to stand in positions so as to catch the ball easily in cricket.—ns. Field′-allow′ance, a small extra payment to officers on active service; Field′-artill′ery, light ordnance suited for active operations in the field; Field′-bed, a camp or trestle bedstead; Field′-book, a book used in surveying fields.—n.pl. Field′-col′ours, small flags used for marking the position for companies and regiments, also any regimental headquarters' flags.—n. Field′-day, a day when troops are drawn out for instruction in field exercises: any day of unusual bustle.—adj. Field′ed (Shak.), encamped.—ns. Field′er, one who fields; Field′fare, a species of thrush, having a reddish-yellow throat and breast spotted with black; Field′-glass, a binocular telescope slung over the shoulder in a case; Field′-gun, a light cannon mounted on a carriage; Field′-hand, an outdoor farm labourer; Field′-hos′pital, a temporary hospital near the scene of battle; Field′-ice, ice formed in the polar seas in large surfaces, distinguished from icebergs; Field′ing, the acting in the field at cricket as distinguished from batting; Field′-mar′shal, an officer of the highest rank in the army; Field′-meet′ing, a conventicle; Field′-mouse, a species of mouse that lives in the fields; Field′-night, a night marked by some important gathering, discussion, &c.; Field′-off′icer, a military officer above the rank of captain, and below that of general; Field′piece, a cannon or piece of artillery used in the field of battle; Field′-preach′er, one who preaches in the open air; Field′-preach′ing; Fields′man, a fielder.—n.pl. Field′-sports, sports of the field, as hunting, racing, &c.—n. Field′-train, a department of the Royal Artillery responsible for the safety and supply of ammunition during war.—advs. Field′ward, -wards, toward the fields.—n.pl. Field′works, temporary works thrown up by troops in the field, either for protection or to cover an attack upon a stronghold.—Field of vision, the compass of visual po

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gasp

Gasp

gasp, v.i. to gape in order to catch breath: to desire eagerly.—n. the act of opening the mouth to catch the breath.—pr.p. and adj. Gasp′ing, convulsive, spasmodic.—adv. Gasp′ingly.—The last gasp, the utmost extremity. [Ice. geispa, to yawn, by metathesis from geipsa, cf. geip, idle talk.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Grasp

Grasp

grasp, v.t. to seize and hold by clasping with the fingers or arms: to catch at: to comprehend.—v.i. to endeavour to seize: to catch (with at).—n. gripe of the hand: reach of the arms: power of seizing: mental power of apprehension.—adj. Grasp′able.—n. Grasp′er.—p.adj. Grasp′ing, seizing: avaricious: encroaching.—adv. Grasp′ingly.—n. Grasp′ingness.—adj. Grasp′less, feeble, relaxed. [M. E. graspengrapsen, as clasp—M. E. claspen; allied to grope, grapple.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hare

Hare

hār, n. a common and very timid animal, with a divided upper lip and long hind-legs, which runs swiftly by leaps.—ns. Hare-and-hounds, a boys' game in which some set off on a long run across country, dropping pieces of paper (the scent) as they go, and others try to overtake, following their trail; Hare′bell, a plant with blue bell-shaped flowers.—adjs. Hare′-brained, giddy: heedless; Hare′-foot, swift of foot like a hare; Har′ish, somewhat like a hare.—n. Hare′-lip, a fissure in the upper human lip like that of a hare.—adj. Hare′-lipped.—n. Hare's′-ear, a genus of umbelliferous plants having yellow flowers.—First catch your hare, make sure you have a thing first before you think what to do with it—from a direction in Mrs Glasse's cookery-book, where catch, however, was a misprint for 'case'=skin; Hold with the hare and run with the hounds, to play a double and deceitful game, to be with both sides at once; Jugged hare, hare cut into pieces and stewed with wine and other seasoning; Mad as a March hare, from the gambols of the hare during the breeding season. [A.S. hara; Dut. haas, Dan. hare, Ger. hase.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hook

Hook

hook, n. a piece of metal bent into a curve, so as to catch or hold anything: a snare: an advantageous hold: a curved instrument for cutting grain: a spit of land projecting into the sea, ending in a hook-shaped form.—v.t. to catch or hold with a hook: to draw as with a hook: to ensnare: (golf) to drive a ball widely to the left—also Draw.—v.i. to bend: to be curved.—adj. Hooked.—ns. Hook′edness, the state of being bent like a hook; Hook′er, he who, or that which, hooks.—adj. Hook′-nosed, having a hooked or curved nose.—n. Hook′-pin, an iron pin with hooked head used for pinning the frame of a floor or roof together.—adj. Hook′y, full of, or pertaining to, hooks.—Hook and eye, a contrivance for fastening dresses by means of a hook made to fasten on a ring or eye on another part of the dress; Hook it (slang), to decamp, make off.—By hook or by crook, one way or the other; Off the hooks, out of gear: superseded: dead; On one's own hook, on one's own responsibility. [A.S. hóc; Dut. haak, Ger. haken.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mail

Mail

māl, n. a bag for the conveyance of letters, &c.: the contents of such a bag: the person or the carriage by which the mail is conveyed.—v.t. to put into the mail: to send by mail.—adj. Mail′able, capable of being sent by mail.—ns. Mail′-bag, a bag in which letters are carried; Mail′-boat, a boat which carries the public mails; Mail′-cart, a cart in which mails are carried: a small cart, with long handles, for the amusement of children; Mail′-catch′er, an apparatus attached to a mail-carriage to catch up mail-bags while the train is in motion; Mail′-coach, -car, or -drag, the conveyance which carries the public mails; Mail′-guard, an officer who guards the public mails; Mail′ing-tā′ble, a table used in a post-office in sorting letters; Mail′-train, a railway train which carries the public mails. [O. Fr. male, a trunk, a mail—Old High Ger. malaha, a sack; Gael. mala, a sack.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. detrimentally
  • B. harmfully
  • C. harmlessly
  • D. noxiously