Synonyms containing change of place

We've found 23,543 synonyms:

Change

Change

chānj, v.t. to alter or make different: to put or give for another: to make to pass from one state to another: to exchange.—v.i. to suffer change: to change one's clothes.—n. the act of changing: alteration or variation of any kind: (Shak.) exchange: (Shak.) fickleness: a shift: variety: small coin: also used as a short term for the Exchange.—ns. Changeabil′ity, Change′ableness, fickleness: power of being changed.—adj. Change′able, subject or prone to change: fickle: inconstant.—adv. Change′ably.—adj. Change′ful, full of change: changeable.—adv. Change′fully.—ns. Change′fulness; Change′-house (Scot.), a small inn or alehouse.—adj. Change′less, without change: constant.—ns. Change′ling, a child taken or left by the fairies in place of another—usually an under-sized, crabbed child: one apt to change; Chang′er, one who changes the form of anything: one employed in changing or discounting money; Chang′ing-piece (Shak.), a fickle person.—Change colour, to blush or turn pale; Change one's mind, to form a different opinion; Change one's self, to change one's clothes; Change one's tune, to change from joy to sorrow: to change one's manner of speaking.—Put the change on, to delude, trick.—Ring the changes, to go through the various changes in ringing a peal of bells: to go over in every possible order: to pass counterfeit money: to bemuddle a shopman into giving too much change. [Fr. changer—Late L. cambiāre—L. cambīre, to barter.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Climate change adaptation

Climate change adaptation

Climate change adaptation is a response to global warming (also known as "climate change" or "anthropogenic climate change"), that seeks to reduce the vulnerability of social and biological systems to relatively sudden change and thus offset the effects of global warming. Even if emissions are stabilized relatively soon, global warming and its effects should last many years, and adaptation would be necessary to the resulting changes in climate. Adaptation is especially important in developing countries since those countries are predicted to bear the brunt of the effects of global warming. That is, the capacity and potential for humans to adapt (called adaptive capacity) is unevenly distributed across different regions and populations, and developing countries generally have less capacity to adapt. Furthermore, the degree of adaptation correlates to the situational focus on environmental issues. Therefore, adaptation requires the situational assessment of sensitivity and vulnerability to environmental impacts.Adaptive capacity is closely linked to social and economic development according to the IPCC. The economic costs of adaptation to climate change are likely to cost billions of dollars annually for the next several decades, though the amount of money needed is unknown. Donor countries promised an annual $100 billion by 2020 through the Green Climate Fund for developing countries to adapt to climate change. However, while the fund was set up during COP16 in Cancún, concrete pledges by developed countries have not been forthcoming. The adaptation challenge grows with the magnitude and the rate of climate change. Another response to climate change is known as climate change mitigation. It advocates to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or enhance the removal of these gases from the atmosphere (through carbon sinks). Even the most effective reductions in emissions, however, would not prevent further climate change impacts, making the need for adaptation unavoidable. A study has concluded, with very high confidence, that in the absence of mitigation efforts, the effects of climate change would reach such a magnitude as to make adaptation impossible for some natural ecosystems. Others are concerned that climate adaptation programs might interfere with the existing development programs and thus lead to unintended consequences for vulnerable groups. For human systems, the economic and social costs of unmitigated climate change would be very high.

— Wikipedia

Move

Move

mōōv, v.t. to cause to change place or posture: to set in motion: to impel: to excite to action: to persuade: to instigate: to arouse: to provoke: to touch the feelings of: to propose or bring before an assembly: to recommend.—v.i. to go from one place to another: to change place or posture: to walk, to carry one's self: to change residence: to make a motion as in an assembly: to bow or salute on meeting.—n. the act of moving: a proceeding or step: a movement, esp. at chess.—adj. Move′less, immovable.—ns. Move′ment, act or manner of moving: change of position: motion of the mind, emotion: a series of incidents moving continuously towards one end: particular arrangement of the moving parts in a mechanism, esp. the wheelwork of a clock or watch: (mil.) a strategic change of position: (mus.) melodic progression, accentual character, tempo or pace; Mov′er.—adj. Mov′ing, causing motion: changing position: affecting the feelings: pathetic.—adv. Mov′ingly.—Know a move or two, to be sharp or knowing; On the move, changing or about to change one's place. [O. Fr. movoir (Fr. mouvoir)—L. movēre, to move.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fold change

Fold change

Fold change is a measure describing how much a quantity changes between an original and a subsequent measurement. It is defined as the ratio between the two quantities; for quantities A and B, then the fold change of B with respect to A is B/A. Fold change is often used when analysing multiple measurements of a biological system taken at different times as the change described by the ratio between the time points is easier to interpret than the difference. Fold change is so called because it is common to describe an increase of multiple X as an "X-fold increase". As such, several dictionaries, including the Oxford English Dictionary and Merriam-Webster Dictionary, as well as Collins's Dictionary of Mathematics, define "-fold" to mean "times", as in "2-fold" = "2 times" = "double". Likely because of this definition, many scientists use not only "fold", but also "fold change" to be synonymous with "times", as in "3-fold larger" = "3 times larger".. More ambiguous is fold decrease, where, for instance, a decrease of 50% between two measurements would generally be referred to a "half-fold change" rather than a "2-fold decrease".Fold change is often used in analysis of gene expression data from microarray and RNA-Seq experiments for measuring change in the expression level of a gene. A disadvantage and serious risk of using fold change in this setting is that it is biased and may misclassify differentially expressed genes with large differences (B − A) but small ratios (B/A), leading to poor identification of changes at high expression levels. Furthermore, when the denominator is close to zero, the ratio is not stable, and the fold change value can be disproportionately affected by measurement noise.

— Wikipedia

Place

Place

plās, n. a broad way in a city: an open space used for a particular purpose: a particular locality: a town: room to dwell, sit, or stand in: the position held by anybody, employment, office, a situation: a mansion with its grounds: proper position or dignity, priority in such: stead: passage in a book: a topic, matter of discourse: in sporting contests, position among the first three.—v.t. to put in any place or condition: to find a home for: to settle: to lend: invest: to ascribe.—n. Place′-hunt′er, one who seeks eagerly official position or public office.—adj. Place′less, without place or office.—ns. Place′man, one who has a place or office under a government:—pl. Place′men; Place′ment, placing or setting; Place′-mong′er, one who traffics in appointments to places; Place′-name, the name of a place or locality: a local name; Plac′er.—Give place, to make room, to yield; Have place, to have existence; In place, in position: opportune; Out of place, inappropriate, unseasonable; Take place, to come to pass: to take precedence of. [Fr.,—L. platea, a broad street—Gr. plateia, a street—platys, broad.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Transform

Transform

trans-form′, v.t. to change the shape of: to change into another substance: to change the disposition.—v.i. to be changed in form or substance.—adj. Transfor′mable.—ns. Transformā′tion, change of form or substance, metamorphosis: the change of one metal into another: (path.) any morbid change in a part; Transformā′tion-scene, any scene on the stage which changes in presence of the audience.—adj. Transfor′mative.—ns. Transfor′mātor, Transfor′mer.—p.adj. Transfor′ming, effecting, or able to effect, a change of form or state.—ns. Transfor′mism, the theory of the development of one species from another; Transfor′mist.—adj. Transformis′tic.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Place attachment

Place attachment

Place attachment is the emotional bond between person and place, and is a main concept in environmental psychology. It is highly influenced by an individual and his or her personal experiences. There is a considerable amount of research dedicated to defining what makes a place "meaningful" enough for place attachment to occur. Schroeder (1991) notably discussed the difference between "meaning" and "preference," defining meaning as "the thoughts, feelings, memories and interpretations evoked by a landscape" and preference as "the degree of liking for one landscape compared to another."Place attachment is multi-dimensional and cannot be explained simply through a cause and effect relationship. Instead, it depends on a reciprocal relationship between behavior and experiences. Due to numerous varying opinions on the definition and components of place attachment, organizational models have been scarce until recent years. A noteworthy conceptual framework is the Tripartite Model, developed by Scannell and Gifford (2010), which defines the variables of place attachment as the three P’s: Person, Process, and Place.When describing place attachment, scholars differentiate between a “rootedness” and a “sense of place”. Sense of place attachment arises as the result of cultivation of meaning and artifacts associated with created places. Due to constant migration over the past few centuries, Americans are thought to most commonly have this type of place attachment, as they have not stayed in a place long enough to develop storied roots. Rootedness, on the other hand, is an unconscious attachment to a place due to familiarity achieved through continuous residence––perhaps that of a familial lineage that has known this place in the years before the current resident. Little is known about the neurological changes that make place attachment possible because of the exaggerated focus on social aspects by environmental psychologists, the difficulties in measuring place attachment over time, and the heavy influence of individualistic experiences and emotions on the degree of attachment.

— Wikipedia

Physical change

Physical change

Physical changes are changes affecting the form of a chemical substance, but do not change the chemical composition of that substance. Physical changes are used to separate mixtures into their component compounds, but can not usually be used to separate compounds into chemical elements or simpler compounds. Physical changes occur when objects or substances undergo a change that does not change their chemical composition. This contrasts with the concept of chemical change in which the composition of a substance changes or one or more substances combine or break up to form new substances. In general a physical change is reversible using physical means. For example salt dissolved in water can be recovered by allowing the water to evaporate. A physical change involves a change in physical properties. Examples of physical properties include melting, transition to a gas, change of strength, change of durability, changes to crystal form, textural change, shape, size, color, volume and density. An example of a physical change is the process of tempering steel to form a knife blade. A steel blank is repeatedly heated and hammered which changes the hardness of the steel, its flexibility and its ability to maintain a sharp edge.

— Freebase

Conversion

Conversion

a spiritual and moral change attending a change of belief with conviction; a change of heart; a change from the service of the world to the service of God; a change of the ruling disposition of the soul, involving a transformation of the outward life

— Webster Dictionary

Variable

Variable

vā′ri-a-bl, adj. that may be varied: changeable: liable to change: unsteady: (bot., zool.) of a species embracing many individuals and groups departing more or less from the strict type: (math.) quantitatively indeterminate: (astron.) changing in brightness.—n. (math.) a quantity subject to continual increase or decrease: a quantity which may have an infinite number of values in the same expression: a shifting wind.—ns. Variabil′ity (biol.), tendency to depart in any direction from the mean character of the species; Vā′riableness.—adv. Vā′riably.—v.t. Vā′riate, to vary.—v.i. to change.—adj. Vā′riated, varied, diversified: varriated.—n. Variā′tion, a varying: a change: change from one to another: successive change: the extent to which a thing varies: (gram.) change of termination: (mus.) a manner of singing or playing the same air with various changes in time, rhythm, or key: (astron.) deviation from the mean orbit of a heavenly body: (biol.) departure from the mean character of a species.—adjs. Variā′tional, pertaining to variation; Vā′riative, tending to variation.—Variable species, any species with marked rate of variability. [Fr.,—L. variabilis.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Transpose

Transpose

trans-pōz′, v.t. to put each in the place of the other: to change, as the order of words, or the key in music.—adj. Transpō′sable.—ns. Transpō′sal, a change of place or order; Transpō′ser; Transposi′tion, act of putting one thing in place of another: state of being transposed; a change of the order of words: (mus.) a change of key into a higher or lower scale.—adjs. Transposi′tional; Transpos′itive.—adv. Transpos′itively.—n. Transpos′itor. [Fr.,—L. transponĕretrans, across, ponĕre, to place.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sound change

Sound change

Sound change includes any processes of language change that affect pronunciation or sound system structures. Sound change can consist of the replacement of one speech sound by another, the complete loss of the affected sound, or even the introduction of a new sound in a place where there previously was none. Sound changes can be environmentally conditioned, meaning that the change in question only occurs in a defined sound environment, whereas in other environments the same speech sound is not affected by the change. The term "sound change" refers to diachronic changes, or changes in a language's underlying sound system over time; "alternation", on the other hand, refers to surface changes that happen synchronically and do not change the language's underlying system. However, since "sound change" can refer to the historical introduction of an alternation, the label is inherently imprecise and often must be clarified as referring to phonetic change or restructuring.

— Freebase

Place-based education

Place-based education

Place-based education, sometimes called pedagogy of place, place-based learning, experiential education, community-based education, education for sustainability, environmental education or more rarely, service learning, is an educational philosophy. The term was coined in the early 1990s by Laurie Lane-Zucker of The Orion Society and Dr. John Elder of Middlebury College. Orion's early work in the area of place-based education was funded by the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. Although educators have used its principles for some time, the approach was developed initially by The Orion Society, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit organization, as well as Professor David Sobel, Project Director at Antioch University New England. Place-based education seeks to help communities through employing students and school staff in solving community problems. Place-based education differs from conventional text and classroom-based education in that it understands students' local community as one of the primary resources for learning. Thus, place-based education promotes learning that is rooted in what is local—the unique history, environment, culture, economy, literature, and art of a particular place—that is, in students' own "place" or immediate schoolyard, neighborhood, town or community. According to this pedagogy, grade school students often lose what place-based educators call their "sense of place" through focusing too quickly or exclusively on national or global issues. This is not to say that international and domestic issues are peripheral to place-based education, but that students should first have a grounding in the history, culture and ecology of their surrounding environment before moving on to broader subjects. Place-based education is often interdisciplinary. It aligns with several popular pedagogies, including thematic, hands-on, or project-based learning. Place-based curriculum begins with topics or issues from the local community.

— Wikipedia

Fiscal multiplier

Fiscal multiplier

In economics, the fiscal multiplier (not to be confused with the money multiplier) is the ratio of change in national income arising from a change in government spending. More generally, the exogenous spending multiplier is the ratio of change in national income arising from any autonomous change in spending (including private investment spending, consumer spending, government spending, or spending by foreigners on the country's exports). When this multiplier exceeds one, the enhanced effect on national income may be called the multiplier effect. The mechanism that can give rise to a multiplier effect is that an initial incremental amount of spending can lead to increased income and hence increased consumption spending, increasing income further and hence further increasing consumption, etc., resulting in an overall increase in national income greater than the initial incremental amount of spending. In other words, an initial change in aggregate demand may cause a change in aggregate output (and hence the aggregate income that it generates) that is a multiple of the initial change. The existence of a multiplier effect was initially proposed by Keynes student Richard Kahn in 1930 and published in 1931. Some other schools of economic thought reject or downplay the importance of multiplier effects, particularly in terms of the long run. The multiplier effect has been used as an argument for the efficacy of government spending or taxation relief to stimulate aggregate demand. In certain cases multiplier values less than one have been empirically measured (an example is sports stadiums), suggesting that certain types of government spending crowd out private investment or consumer spending that would have otherwise taken place. This crowding out can occur because the initial increase in spending may cause an increase in interest rates or in the price level. In 2009, The Economist magazine noted "economists are in fact deeply divided about how well, or indeed whether, such stimulus works", partly because of a lack of empirical data from non-military based stimulus. New evidence came from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, whose benefits were projected based on fiscal multipliers and which was in fact followed—from 2010 to 2012—by a slowing of job loss and job growth in the private sector.

— Wikipedia

Vice

Vice

vīs, prep. in the place of: also a prefix denoting in the compound word one who acts in place of or is second in rank to another.—n. a vice-chairman, &c.: one who acts in place of a superior.—ns. Vice′-ad′miral, one acting in the place of, or second in command to, an admiral; Vice′-ad′miralty, the office of a vice-admiral—(Vice′-ad′miralty courts, tribunals in the British colonies, having jurisdiction over maritime causes); Vice′-chair′man, an alternate chairman; Vice′-chair′manship; Vice′-chan′cellor, one acting for a chancellor: a lower judge of Chancery; (R.C. Church) the cardinal whose duty it is to draft and despatch papal bulls and briefs; Vice′-chan′cellorship; Vice′-con′sul, one who acts in a consul's place: a consul in a less important district; Vice′-con′sulship; Vice-dean′, a canon chosen to represent an absent dean; Vicegē′rency, the office of a vicegerent, deputed power.—adj. Vicegē′rent, acting in place of another, having delegated authority.—n. one acting in place of a superior.—ns. Vice′-gov′ernor, deputy governor; Vice′-king, one who acts in place of a king; Vice′-pres′idency, -pres′identship; Vice′-pres′ident, an officer next in rank below the president; Vice′-prin′cipal, assistant principal.—adj. Vicerē′gal.—ns. Vicerē′gency; Vice′roy, Vicerē′gent, one representing the royal authority in a dependency, as in India; Viceroy′alty, Vice′royship. [L., 'in the place of,' abl. of vicis (gen.), change.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. admit
  • B. refuse
  • C. decline
  • D. reject