Synonyms containing character building

We've found 14,226 synonyms:

Building automation

Building automation

Building automation is the automatic centralized control of a building's heating, ventilation and air conditioning, lighting and other systems through a building management system or building automation system (BAS). The objectives of building automation are improved occupant comfort, efficient operation of building systems, reduction in energy consumption and operating costs, and improved life cycle of utilities. Building automation is an example of a distributed control system – the computer networking of electronic devices designed to monitor and control the mechanical, security, fire and flood safety, lighting (especially emergency lighting), HVAC and humidity control and ventilation systems in a building.BAS core functionality keeps building climate within a specified range, provides light to rooms based on an occupancy schedule (in the absence of overt switches to the contrary), monitors performance and device failures in all systems, and provides malfunction alarms to building maintenance staff. A BAS should reduce building energy and maintenance costs compared to a non-controlled building. Most commercial, institutional, and industrial buildings built after 2000 include a BAS. Many older buildings have been retrofitted with a new BAS, typically financed through energy and insurance savings, and other savings associated with pre-emptive maintenance and fault detection. A building controlled by a BAS is often referred to as an intelligent building, "smart building", or (if a residence) a "smart home". In 2018, one of the world's first smart houses was built in Klaukkala, Finland in the form of a five-floor apartment block, utilizing the Kone Residential Flow solution created by KONE, allowing even a smartphone to act as a home key. Commercial and industrial buildings have historically relied on robust proven protocols (like BACnet) while proprietary protocols (like X-10) were used in homes. Recent IEEE standards (notably IEEE 802.15.4, IEEE 1901 and IEEE 1905.1, IEEE 802.21, IEEE 802.11ac, IEEE 802.3at) and consortia efforts like nVoy (which verifies IEEE 1905.1 compliance) or QIVICON have provided a standards-based foundation for heterogeneous networking of many devices on many physical networks for diverse purposes, and quality of service and failover guarantees appropriate to support human health and safety. Accordingly, commercial, industrial, military and other institutional users now use systems that differ from home systems mostly in scale. See home automation for more on entry level systems, nVoy, 1905.1, and the major proprietary vendors who implement or resist this trend to standards integration. Almost all multi-story green buildings are designed to accommodate a BAS for the energy, air and water conservation characteristics. Electrical device demand response is a typical function of a BAS, as is the more sophisticated ventilation and humidity monitoring required of "tight" insulated buildings. Most green buildings also use as many low-power DC devices as possible. Even a passivhaus design intended to consume no net energy whatsoever will typically require a BAS to manage heat capture, shading and venting, and scheduling device use.

— Wikipedia

Chrysler Building

Chrysler Building

The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco–style skyscraper located on the East Side of Midtown Manhattan in New York City, at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue in the Turtle Bay neighborhood of Manhattan. At 1,046 feet (318.9 m), the structure was the world's tallest building for 11 months before it was surpassed by the Empire State Building in 1931. It is the tallest brick building in the world with a steel framework. As of 2018, the Chrysler is the eighth-tallest building in the city, tied with The New York Times Building.Originally a project of real estate developer and former New York State Senator William H. Reynolds, the building was constructed by Walter Chrysler, the head of the Chrysler Corporation, and served as the corporation's headquarters from 1930 until the mid-1950s. The Chrysler Building's construction was characterized by a competition with 40 Wall Street and the Empire State Building to become the world's tallest building. Although the Chrysler Building was built and designed specifically for the car manufacturer, the corporation did not pay for its construction and never owned it, as Walter Chrysler decided to pay for it himself, so that his children could inherit it. When the Chrysler Building opened, there were mixed reviews of the building's design, ranging from its being inane and unoriginal to that it was modernist and iconic. Perceptions of the building have slowly evolved into its now being seen as a paragon of the Art Deco architectural style; and in 2007, it was ranked ninth on the List of America's Favorite Architecture by the American Institute of Architects.

— Wikipedia

relocatable building

relocatable building

A building designed to be readily moved, erected, disassembled, stored, and reused. All types of buildings or building forms designed to provide relocatable capabilities are included in this definition. In classifying buildings as relocatable, the estimated funded and unfunded costs for average building disassembly, repackaging (including normal repair and refurbishment of components), and nonrecoverable building components, including typical foundations, may not exceed 20 percent of the building acquisition cost. Excluded from this definition are building types and forms that are provided as an integral part of a mobile equipment item and that are incidental portions of such equipment components, such as communications vans or trailers.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Midac

Midac

MIDAC is an acronym created in 1981 by a Sydney-based business, Combined Resources Computing (CRC). It stands for Microprocessor Intelligent Data Acquisition and Control. CRC was established in order to complete several building automation projects commenced by R-Tec. R-Tec was an Australian development company based in Sydney that focussed on designing innovative computerised building automation products. The proprietors formed R-Tec in the late 1970s after leaving Johnson Controls. The early R-Tec automation systems used TTL logic with control parameters stored in dynamic memory. The early computerised building automation systems or BAS monitored alarms and conditions relating to building services including air conditioning, water and power, etc. They also controlled plant by starting and stopping pumps and fans according to time and other interlock conditions. The systems of the 1970s and early 1980s used parallel or multiple conductor communications data busses to communication with Data Gathering Panels (DGPs) located throughout the building. The DGPs would communicate monitored conditions using multiplex techniques back to a central location and "front end" system through the parallel data trunk. In the same way commands to start and stop plant would be sent from the front end to the DGP and then to the machine. All decisions or "intelligence" was centrally located, and the DGPs simply relayed information. Combined Resources Computing was established by Kevin Johnson-Bade, an ex R-Tec software engineer, with the prime goal of completing the building automation system contracted to R-Tec by the University of Melbourne. This occurred when R-Tec closed down, being unable to complete its contractual commitments. The University of Melbourne building automation system was ambitious. In 1982 it was possibly the first successful implementation of a distributed intelligence building automation or Direct Digital Control or DDC system using Z80 microprocessors. Remote units called Satellite Intelligence Units (SIUs) were located in buildings around the campus and were connected to the front end using a serial communications. See: Distributed control system CRC developed a unique object-oriented control algorithm building approach. Even though the Z80 microprocessor of the time ran at only 1 MHz, and had a memory addressing range of 64 Kbytes, the University of Melbourne system out-performed other automations systems of the time significantly. CRC created a front-end computer that used ten processors to share the task, having access to up to 256 pages of shared memory. Each SIU used two Z80 processors. This allowed the intelligence to be shared, and many decisions to be made locally thus further reducing the load on the front end and reducing communications. The University of Melbourne system was a leader in the development of distributed intelligence DDC system. Out of CRC Midac System Pty Limited was formed in 1982, and went on to develop and implement more leading DDC technology included systems where the front-end computer was a CPM operating system MZ3500 Sharp personal computer. The Sharp was chosen because of its much superior graphics compared with the early IBM PC of the early 1980s. Over the following years the major players like Johnson and Honeywell would follow, replacing their mini-computer front-end terminals with PCs as they implemented microprocessor-based distributed intelligence systems using serial communications networks. Toward the end of the 1980s and early 1990s most DDC systems included an object-oriented control algorithm building tool. They compiled the object-oriented instructions into the system's native proprietary linear language, whereas in the Midac approach the control system's native language or operating environment was itself object-oriented. Midac went on to develop three new generations of microprocessor-based DDC systems, the last version being Nexus, developed for DKS that was taken over by James Hardie's Building Automation division. That business and its assets including Nexus were purchased by Chubb International in the late 1990s.

— Wikipedia

Bauakademie

Bauakademie

The Bauakademie (Building Academy) in Berlin, Germany, was a higher education school for art of building to train master builders. It originated from the construction department of the Academy of Fine Arts and Mechanical Sciences (from 1704), which emphasized the aesthetic elements of art of building while ignoring the technical. Thus, the governmental Upper Building Department ("UBD") decided to establish an entirely new building educational institution named "Bauakademie". It was founded on 18 March 1799 by King Frederick William III and, in 1801, incorporated into the UBD, as its section. The building of the Building Academy (Bauakademie) built between 1832 and 1836 (later known as Schinkel's Bauakademie), is considered one of the forerunners of modern architecture due to its hithertofore uncommon use of red brick and the relatively streamlined facade of the building. Designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel, it was built near the Berlin City Palace and accommodated two royal Prussian institutions: the State Construction Commission (Oberbaudeputation), of which Schinkel was the director, and - first of all - the Building Academy (institution), which in 1879 gave birth to the Royal Technical Higher School (Königlich Technische Hochschule Charlottenburg) - the forerunner of the Technical University of Berlin. For nearly 50 years (1885-1933), the Bauakademie became the home of the „Königlich Preussische Messbild-Anstalt“ renamed to „Staatliche Bildstelle“ in 1921. This institution, under its director Albrecht Meydenbauer, became the first world-wide office professionally working with photogrammetry and establishing an archive of historical buildings based on photography. By 1920, approximately 20.000 glass-negatives of the format 30x30 cm and 40x40 cm had been collected in Germany and abroad. During the Weimar period, the Bauakademie was the home of the famous Deutsche Hochschule für Politik as well as other institutions supported by the State of Prussia. Damaged during World War II, the Bauakademie was then partially restored, but in 1962 the building was demolished to make room for the future Ministry of Foreign Affairs of East Germany. In 1995, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of East Germany was demolished in order to recreate the Werderscher Markt area. Since then, proposals to rebuild Schinkel's Bauakademie have been discussed with city and Federal authorities. The Werderscher Markt area has already been partially recreated by the Bertelsmann-funded reconstruction of the Alte Kommandantur. As for the Bauakademie, between 2000 and 2001 students erected a temporary structure to give an impression of the volume and form of the building. Current proposals under consideration intend to use a reconstructed Bauakademie to accommodate an architecture museum as well as a Mercedes-Benz research institute about the future of the automobile. The cost of the project is estimated at 51 million euros.

— Wikipedia

Green Arrow

Green Arrow

Green Arrow is a fictional superhero who appears in comic books published by DC Comics. Created by Mort Weisinger and designed by George Papp, he first appeared in More Fun Comics #73 in November 1941. His real name is Oliver Jonas Queen, a wealthy businessman and owner of Queen Industries who is also a well-known celebrity in Star City. He uses this position to hide the fact that he is the Arrow. Sometimes shown dressed like the character Robin Hood, Green Arrow is an archer who uses his skills to fight crime in his home cities of Star City and Seattle, as well as alongside his fellow superheroes as a member of the Justice League. Though much less frequently used in modern stories, he also deploys a range of trick arrows (in contemporary times, they are referred as "specialty arrows") with various special functions, such as glue, explosive-tipped, grappling hook, flash grenade, tear gas and even kryptonite arrows for use in a range of special situations. At the time of his debut, Green Arrow functioned in many ways as an archery-themed analogue of the very popular Batman character, but writers at DC subsequently developed him into a voice of left-wing politics very much distinct in character from Batman. Green Arrow enjoyed moderate success in his early years, becoming the cover feature of More Fun, as well as having occasional appearances in other comics. Throughout his first twenty-five years, however, the character never enjoyed greater popularity. In the late 1960s, writer Denny O'Neil, inspired by the character's dramatic visual redesign by Neal Adams, chose to have him lose his fortune, giving him the then-unique role of a streetwise crusader for the working class and the disadvantaged. In 1970, he was paired with a more law and order-oriented hero, Green Lantern, in a ground-breaking, socially conscious comic book series. Since then, he has been popular among comic book fans and most writers have taken an urban, gritty approach to the character. The character was killed off in the 1990s and replaced by a new character, Oliver's son Connor Hawke. Connor, however, proved a less popular character, and the original Oliver Queen character was resurrected in the 2001 "Quiver" storyline, by writer Kevin Smith. In the 2000s, the character has been featured in bigger storylines focusing on Green Arrow and Black Canary, such as the DC event The Green Arrow/Black Canary Wedding and the high-profile Justice League: Cry for Justice storyline, prior to the character's relaunch alongside most of DC's properties in 2011. Green Arrow was not initially a well-known character outside of comic book fandom: he had appeared in a single episode of the animated series Super Friends in 1973. In the 2000s, the character appeared in a number of DC television properties, including the animated series Justice League Unlimited, Young Justice, The Batman and Batman: The Brave and the Bold, and several DC Universe Animated Original Movies. In live action, he appeared in the series Smallville, played by actor Justin Hartley, and became a core cast member. In 2012, the live action series Arrow debuted on The CW, in which the title character was portrayed by Stephen Amell, and launching several spin-off series, becoming the starting point for a shared television franchise called the Arrowverse.

— Wikipedia

High-rise building

High-rise building

A high-rise building is a tall building, as opposed to a low-rise building and is defined by its height differently in various jurisdictions. It is used as a residential, office building, or other functions including hotel, retail, or with multiple purposes combined. Residential high-rise buildings are also known as tower blocks and may be referred to as "MDUs", standing for "multi-dwelling unit". A very tall high-rise building is referred to as a skyscraper. High-rise buildings became possible with the invention of the elevator (lift) and less expensive, more abundant building materials. The materials used for the structural system of high-rise buildings are reinforced concrete and steel. Most North American style skyscrapers have a steel frame, while residential blocks are usually constructed of concrete. There is no clear difference between a tower block and a skyscraper, although a building with forty or more stories and taller than 150 m (490 ft) is generally considered a skyscraper.High-rise structures pose particular design challenges for structural and geotechnical engineers, particularly if situated in a seismically active region or if the underlying soils have geotechnical risk factors such as high compressibility or bay mud. They also pose serious challenges to firefighters during emergencies in high-rise structures. New and old building design, building systems like the building standpipe system, HVAC systems (heating, ventilation and air conditioning), fire sprinkler system and other things like stairwell and elevator evacuations pose significant problems. Studies are often required to ensure that pedestrian wind comfort and wind danger concerns are addressed. In order to allow less wind exposure, to transmit more daylight to the ground and to appear more slender, many high-rises have a design with setbacks. Apartment buildings have technical and economic advantages in areas of high population density, and have become a distinctive feature of housing accommodation in virtually all densely populated urban areas around the world. In contrast with low-rise and single-family houses, apartment blocks accommodate more inhabitants per unit of area of land and decrease the cost of municipal infrastructure.

— Wikipedia

Burj Khalifa

Burj Khalifa

The Burj Khalifa (Arabic: برج خليفة‎, Arabic pronunciation: [bʊrd͡ʒ xaˈliːfa]; pronounced English: , literally "Khalifa Tower" in English), known as the Burj Dubai prior to its inauguration in 2010, is a skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. With a total height of 829.8 m (2,722 ft, just over half a mile) and a roof height (excluding antenna, but including a 244 m spire) of 828 m (2,717 ft), the Burj Khalifa has been the tallest structure and building in the world since its topping out in 2009 (preceded by Taipei 101).Construction of the Burj Khalifa began in 2004, with the exterior completed five years later in 2009. The primary structure is reinforced concrete. The building was opened in 2010 as part of a new development called Downtown Dubai. It is designed to be the centrepiece of large-scale, mixed-use development. The decision to construct the building is based on the government's decision to diversify from an oil-based economy, and for Dubai to gain international recognition. The building was originally named Burj Dubai but was renamed in honour of the ruler of Abu Dhabi and president of the United Arab Emirates, Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan; Abu Dhabi and the UAE government lent Dubai money to pay its debts. The building broke numerous height records, including its designation as the tallest building in the world. Burj Khalifa was designed by Adrian Smith, of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, whose firm designed the Willis Tower and One World Trade Center. Hyder Consulting was chosen to be the supervising engineer with NORR Group Consultants International Limited chosen to supervise the architecture of the project. The design is derived from the Islamic architecture of the region, such as in the Great Mosque of Samarra. The Y-shaped tripartite floor geometry is designed to optimize residential and hotel space. A buttressed central core and wings are used to support the height of the building. Although this design was derived from Tower Palace III, the Burj Khalifa's central core houses all vertical transportation with the exception of egress stairs within each of the wings. The structure also features a cladding system which is designed to withstand Dubai's hot summer temperatures. It contains a total of 57 elevators and 8 escalators. At a certain point in the architectural and engineering process, the original Emaar developers experienced financial problems, and required more money and economic funding. Sheikh Khalifa, the ruler of the United Arab Emirates, granted monetary aid and funding, hence resulting in the changing of the name to "Burj Khalifa". The concept of profitability derived from building high density developments and malls around the landmark have proven successful. Its surrounding malls, hotels and condominiums in Downtown Dubai have generated the most revenue from the project as a whole, while the Burj Khalifa itself made little or no profit.Critical reception to Burj Khalifa has been generally positive, and the building has received many awards. However, there were numerous complaints concerning migrant workers from South Asia who were the primary building labor force. These centered on low wages and the practice of confiscating passports until duties were complete. Several suicides were reported.

— Wikipedia

National Building

National Building

The National Building is a historic warehouse building in downtown Seattle, Washington, located on the east side of Western Avenue between Spring and Madison Streets in what was historically Seattle's commission district. It is now home to the Seattle Weekly. It is a six story plus basement brick building that covers the entire half-block. The dark red brick facade is simply decorated with piers capped with small Ionic capitals and a small cornice, which is a reproduction of the original cornice. Kingsley & Anderson of Seattle were the architects. The National Building was constructed from late 1904 to mid 1905 by the Northern Pacific Railway as part of the road's multi-million dollar plan to improve their many Seattle properties and capitalize on the city's booming commission trade. One of the building's first tenants was the National Grocery Company which at first only occupied two of the building's eight stores and would later occupy the entire building, becoming its namesake. It would occupy the building until 1930. The building was later home to many small manufacturing and distributing firms and has been an office building since the late 1960s.

— Freebase

Room number

Room number

A room number is a number assigned to a room within a building. Its purpose is to identify a particular room, and help building inhabitants locate that room. Logical and consistent assignment of room numbers is important for efficient everyday building usage, and to allow emergency personnel to quickly and easily find their way to any area of a building. Room numbers may consist of three digits, but can be any number of digits. The room number is generally assigned with the first digit indicating the floor on which the room is located. For example, room 412 would be on the fourth floor of the building; room 540 would be on the fifth floor. Buildings that have more than nine floors will have four digits assigned to rooms beyond the ninth floor. For example, room 1412 would be on the 14th floor. The second digit may represent the wing, or section, of the building in which the room is located: room 540 will typically be found adjacent to room 542, and room 532 adjacent to room 530. In a four digit room number, this digit will be the third digit instead of the second. The third digit is often assigned based on the side of the corridor on which the room is located: one side of the corridor has odd-numbered rooms and the opposite side has even-numbered rooms. However, numbers may also proceed in an ascending manner on one side of the corridor before switching to the opposite side to continue doing so on that side. In four digit room numbers, this digit will be represented by the fourth digit instead of the third. Where a room is subdivided, the rooms which are accessed after entry into the primary room number are denoted by appending a letter suffix to the next room: for example, after entering room 412 doors which lead to other rooms from within room 412 will be labeled 412A, 412B, and so on. This is known as the Parent-Child Room Numbering system. The room which is entered first is known as the Parent Room. Rooms accessed after first passing through the Parent Room are Child Rooms. A letter may appear before the numbers to indicate a particular building or wing. For example, Room D149 is a room in D building. An offset may be used to accommodate unnumbered floors. For example, in a building with floors labeled G, M, 1, 2, ..., 11 and 12, the 4th room in each of those floors could be numbered 104, 114, 124, 134, ..., 224, and 234, respectively — with an offset of 11 in the floor numbers. This trick is sometimes used to make the floor number slightly less obvious, e.g. for security or marketing reasons.

— Wikipedia

main characters

main characters

A main character is the focus – the story's about them. ... 'Any character who has a major purpose or role in the plot and/or interacts regularly with main characters.' Although 'protagonist' is sometimes used as a synonym for main character, a protagonist is specifically the 'lead' character.

— Editors Contribution

GROOT

GROOT

A character from the Movie/Comic, Guardians of the galaxy. Groot (/ɡruːt/) is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by Stan Lee, Larry Lieber and Jack Kirby, the character first appeared in Tales to Astonish #13 (November 1960). An extraterrestrial, sentient tree-like creature, the original Groot first appeared as an invader that intended to capture humans for experimentation. The character was reintroduced as a heroic, noble being in 2006, and appeared in the crossover comic book storyline "Annihilation: Conquest". Groot went on to star in its spin-off series, Guardians of the Galaxy, joining the team of the same name. Groot has been featured in a variety of associated Marvel merchandise, including animated television series, toys and trading cards. Vin Diesel voices Groot in the Marvel Cinematic Universe films Guardians of the Galaxy (2014), Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017), Avengers: Infinity War (2018), and Aveng

— Editors Contribution

GROOT

GROOT

A character from the Movie/Comic, Guardians of the galaxy. Groot (/ɡruːt/) is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by Stan Lee, Larry Lieber and Jack Kirby, the character first appeared in Tales to Astonish #13 (November 1960). An extraterrestrial, sentient tree-like creature, the original Groot first appeared as an invader that intended to capture humans for experimentation. The character was reintroduced as a heroic, noble being in 2006, and appeared in the crossover comic book storyline "Annihilation: Conquest". Groot went on to star in its spin-off series, Guardians of the Galaxy, joining the team of the same name. Groot has been featured in a variety of associated Marvel merchandise, including animated television series, toys and trading cards. Vin Diesel voices Groot in the Marvel Cinematic Universe films Guardians of the Galaxy (2014), Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017), Avengers: Infinity War (2018), and Aveng

— Editors Contribution

Person

Person

pėr′sun, n. character represented, as on the stage: character: an individual, sometimes used slightingly: a living soul: a human being: the outward appearance, &c.: bodily form: one of the three hypostases or individualities in the triune God: (gram.) a distinction in form, according as the subject of the verb is the person speaking, spoken to, or spoken of.—adj. Per′sonable, having a well-formed body or person: of good appearance.—n. Per′sonāge, a person: character represented: an individual of eminence: external appearance.—adj. Per′sonal, belonging to a person: having the nature or quality of a person: peculiar to a person or to his private concerns: pertaining to the external appearance: done in person: relating to one's own self: applied offensively to one's character: (gram.) denoting the person.—n. Personalisā′tion, personification.—v.t. Per′sonalise, to make personal.—ns. Per′sonalism, the character of being personal; Per′sonalist, one who writes personal notes; Personal′ity, that which distinguishes a person from a thing, or one person from another: individuality: a derogatory remark or reflection directly applied to a person—esp. in pl. Personal′ities.—adv. Per′sonally, in a personal or direct manner: in person: individually.—n. Per′sonalty (law), all the property which, when a man dies, goes to his executor or administrator, as distinguished from the realty, which goes to his heir-at-law.—v.t. Per′sonāte, to assume the likeness or character of: to represent: to counterfeit: to feign.—adj. (bot.) mask-like, as in the corollary of the snapdragon: larval, cucullate.—adj. Per′sonāted, impersonated, feigned, assumed.—ns. Personā′tion; Per′sonātor.—n. Personisā′tion.—v.t. Per′sonise, to personify.—n. Personnel′, the persons employed in any service, as distinguished from the materiel.—Personal estate, property, movable goods or property, as distinguished from freehold or real property, esp. in land; Personal exception (Scots law), a ground of objection which applies to an individual and prevents him from doing something which, but for his conduct or situation, he might do; Personal identity, the continued sameness of the individual person, through all changes both without and within, as testified by consciousness; Personal rights, rights which belong to the person as a living, reasonable being; Personal security, security or pledge given by a person, as distinguished from the delivery of some object of value as security; Personal service, delivery of a message or an order into a person's hands, as distinguished from delivery in any other indirect way; Personal transaction, something done by a person's own effort, not through the agency of another.—In person, by one's self, not by a representative. [Fr.,—L. persōna, a player's mask, perh. from persŏnāre, -ātumper, through, sonāre, to sound.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

out of character

out of character

Not in character; not successfully performing within the mindset of a given character in a theatrical performance. See also break character, drop character.

— Wiktionary

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An antonym of "besotted"
  • A. stringent
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  • C. sober
  • D. affluent