Synonyms containing cheque card

We've found 2,010 synonyms:

Vem

Vem

The VEM (Acronym of Vale eletrônico Metropolitano, Electronic Metropolitan Ticket) is a Smart card system used in bus, train and metro of the metropolitan area of Recife, Brazil. The VEM cards operate by using contactless technology as they have an internal chip that communicates with the validator by RFID.Since 11 of June 2014, All credits in VEM card has a validity of 180 days. There are many types of the Vem Card: "Trabalhador" (worker) Green color: is the standard and most issued version, with more than million and half issued cards. This card complies with Brazilian "vale transporte" rules, meaning that the credit is paid by the company that the user works and can only be used by that user in their house to work ride and vice versa, being impossible use the same card twice in a same ride, also there is a daily use limit of 8 rides. The card credit is paid by companies using a web-based application and the card is recharged during its normal use in Buses or Metro after 48 hours the credit is paid by the company. The use and balance of this type of card can be checked using a web-based application. The card is printed with the user name and its CPF. the worker card can also carry "comum" credit type. "Comum" (common) Green color: This is the standard card for non-worker users. It can be obtained by free by any user, as no data of the user is printed on card, however, the first charge is fixed in R$25,00. It can be purchased/recharged only with cash at the VEM site located at Rua da Soledade 259, Boa vista without any fares or at any reseller by adding a convenience fare of 2,5% of the recharge (it is deducted of the charge). How those sellers act as a resellers, often them can not recharge the card because all their "stock of credit" were sold. There is no discount in fare by using this card, except in the case you use interchange train-buses or buses-buses in some very specific lines. How this card is not linked to any law or rule, you can use it how many times you want until the card have credit, also if the card is lost, is impossible to retrieve its credit, as it are not linked to any CPF. the worker card can carry "common" credit type, meaning that is not necessary to buy another card if you have a worked card, you just need to add funds to it. Since June 2014, with the opening of BRT stations, the use of a VEM card is mandatory in the BRT system. The common card can be purchased in BRT Stations by R$4,00. "Estudante" (student) Yellow color: It is granted for almost any student whose school is located within Recife Metropolitan Area (only some exceptions apply) and it deducts only half of the fare. The card is printed with the photo of the user, and after its use, you need to show your student ID card to have your access authorized. In future, the fingerprint will be needed to be presented to certify that is the user that are using the card. To obtain and recharge it, riders need to get a student card and some documents of your school proof of student status. This card can not be used in special services like air conditioned buses, and have a daily limit of 8 uses and a monthly limit of 60 rides. "Rodoviário" (Bus driver) white color: used by bus drivers and fare collector to operate the system and to obtain free ride. the card has the worker photo and can only be used by them, in future, fingerprint will be needed during its use for free rides. "Infantil" (for children) fully colored with drawings: for children under six who cannot go through the turnstiles."Livre Acesso": Blue or Orange color: This card grants access by free in public transport for people with some disability. The blue version is for people that not need a helper to travel, the orange is for who need the helper, granting the free ride for them, too. This card has the user photo printed and can only be used by its user. In future, fingerprint will be needed to be presented. Due Brazilian law, There are no limits for using those cards. "Idoso" (elderly) Red color: Still Not Released. "Vem Jaboatão": The city of Jaboatão dos Guararapes are not part of Grande Recife transport consortium, so it can not use the metropolitan VEM in its municipal micro-buses, so a new VEM needed to be created. It is not compatible with the metropolitan version.

— Wikipedia

Traveler's cheque

Traveler's cheque

A traveler's cheque is a medium of exchange that can be used in place of hard currency. They can be denominated in one of a number of major world currencies and are preprinted, fixed-amount cheques designed to allow the person signing it to make an unconditional payment to someone else as a result of having paid the issuer for that privilege. They are generally used by people on vacation in foreign countries instead of cash, as many businesses used to accept traveler's cheques as currency. The incentive for merchants and other parties to accept them lies in the fact that as long as the original signature (which the buyer is supposed to place on the cheque in ink as soon as they receive the cheque) and the signature made at the time the cheque is used are the same, the cheque's issuer will unconditionally guarantee payment of the face amount even if the cheque was fraudulently issued, stolen, or lost. This means that a traveler's cheque can never 'bounce' unless the issuer goes bankrupt and out of business. If a traveler's cheque were lost or stolen, it could be replaced by the issuing financial institution. The financial institutions issuing traveler's cheques earn income in a number of ways. Firstly, they charge a fee on sale of such cheques. In addition, they can earn interest for the period that the cheques are uncashed, while not paying any interest to the cheque holder, making them effectively interest-free loans. Also, the foreign exchange rate commonly used on traveler's cheques (generally based on rates applicable at the time of purchase) is less favourable compared to other forms of obtaining foreign currency, especially those on credit card transactions (which use a rate applicable at the statement date). In addition, the setup cost and the cost of issuing and processing traveler's cheques is much higher than for credit card transactions. The cheque issuer carries the exchange rate risk, and normally pays a fee to hedge against the risk. Their use has been in decline since the 1990s, when a variety of more convenient alternatives, such as credit cards, debit cards, pre-paid currency cards and automated teller machines, became more widely available and easier for travelers to use. Traveler's cheques are no longer widely accepted and cannot easily be cashed, even at the banks that issued them. The alternatives to traveler's cheques are generally cheaper and more flexible. Travel money cards, for instance, provide features similar to traveler's cheques but offer greater ease and flexibility.

— Wikipedia

Traveller's cheque

Traveller's cheque

A traveller's cheque is a medium of exchange that can be used in place of hard currency. They can be denominated in one of a number of major world currencies and are preprinted, fixed-amount cheques designed to allow the person signing it to make an unconditional payment to someone else as a result of having paid the issuer for that privilege. They are generally used by people on vacation in foreign countries instead of cash, as many businesses used to accept traveler's cheques as currency. The incentive for merchants and other parties to accept them lies in the fact that as long as the original signature (which the buyer is supposed to place on the cheque in ink as soon as they receive the cheque) and the signature made at the time the cheque is used are the same, the cheque's issuer will unconditionally guarantee payment of the face amount even if the cheque was fraudulently issued, stolen, or lost. This means that a traveler's cheque can never 'bounce' unless the issuer goes bankrupt and out of business. If a traveler's cheque were lost or stolen, it could be replaced by the issuing financial institution. The financial institutions issuing traveler's cheques earn income in a number of ways. Firstly, they charge a fee on sale of such cheques. In addition, they can earn interest for the period that the cheques are uncashed, while not paying any interest to the cheque holder, making them effectively interest-free loans. Also, the foreign exchange rate commonly used on traveler's cheques (generally based on rates applicable at the time of purchase) is less favourable compared to other forms of obtaining foreign currency, especially those on credit card transactions (which use a rate applicable at the transaction date). In addition, the setup cost and the cost of issuing and processing traveler's cheques is much higher than for credit card transactions. The cheque issuer carries the exchange rate risk, and normally pays a fee to hedge against the risk. Their use has been in decline since the 1990s, when a variety of more convenient alternatives, such as credit cards, debit cards, pre-paid currency cards and automated teller machines, became more widely available and easier for travelers to use. Traveler's cheques are no longer widely accepted and cannot easily be cashed, even at the banks that issued them. The alternatives to traveler's cheques are generally cheaper and more flexible. Travel money cards, for instance, provide features similar to traveler's cheques but offer greater ease and flexibility.

— Wikipedia

Cheque guarantee card

Cheque guarantee card

A cheque guarantee card was essentially an abbreviated portable letter of credit granted by a bank to a qualified depositor in the form of a plastic card that was used in conjunction with a cheque. The scheme provided retailers accepting cheques with greater security. The retailer would write the card number on the back of the cheque, which was signed in the retailer's presence, and the retailer verified the signature on the cheque against the signature on the card. The cheque could not be stopped and payment could not be refused by the bank. Each bank would set a limit on the maximum amount of an individual cheque that could be guaranteed. The guarantee only applied to cheques drawn on an account provided by the bank that issued the card, and could result in an overdraft with penalty interest on the cardholder. After the introduction of debit cards there was a rapid decline in the use of cheques and of cheque guarantee cards, and these facilities were generally phased out during the 2000s in the countries that operated them. The Irish cheque guarantee scheme officially ended on 31 December 2011, ending the last such scheme in existence.

— Wikipedia

Certified check

Certified check

A certified check or certified cheque is a form of cheque for which the bank verifies that sufficient funds exist in the account to cover the cheque, and so certifies, at the time the cheque is written. Those funds are then set aside in the bank's internal account until the cheque is cashed or returned by the payee. Thus, a certified cheque cannot be stopped (can't "bounce"), and, in this manner, its liquidity is similar to cash, barring bank failure or illegal act (such as the funds being based on a fraudulent loan, at which point the cheque will be disavowed). In some countries, e.g. Germany, it is illegal for a regular bank to certify checks. This regulation is supposed to prevent certified cheques from becoming a universal substitute for cash, which is considered the only legal tender. The Deutsche Bundesbank (Federal Bank) is the only financial institution authorized to issue certified checks. Because of the liquidity and certainty of payment of a certified cheque, it is sometimes considered equivalent to cash, such as in the regulation of credit for casino gaming in Macau, where the law explicitly states that if a casino patron obtains casino chips and pays with a certified cheque, the transaction is not regarded as credit for gaming (see Law 5/2004, art. 2). It is possible to counterfeit or forge a certified cheque, in which case it is not binding on the bank and is worthless; see cashier's check for an exploration of associated risks.

— Wikipedia

Banker's draft

Banker's draft

A banker's draft is a cheque where the funds are taken directly from the financial institution rather than the individual drawer's account. A normal cheque represents an instruction to transfer a sum of money from the drawer's account to the payee's account. When the payee deposits the cheque into their account, the cheque is verified as genuine and the transfer is performed. Any individual or company operating a current account has authority to draw cheques against the funds stored in that account. However, it is impossible to predict when the cheque will be deposited after it is drawn. Because the funds represented by a cheque are not transferred until the cheque is deposited and cleared, it is possible the drawer's account may not have sufficient funds to honour the cheque when the transfer finally occurs. This dishonoured or 'bounced' cheque is now worthless and the payee receives no money, which is why cheques are less secure than cash. By contrast, when an individual requests a banker's draft they must immediately transfer the amount of the draft from their own account to the bank's account. Because the funds of a banker's draft have already been transferred they are proven to be available; unless the draft is a forgery or stolen, or the bank issuing the draft goes out of business before the draft is deposited and cleared, the draft will be honoured. Like other types of cheques, a draft must still be cleared and so it will take several days for the funds to become available in the payee's account.

— Freebase

Loyalty program

Loyalty program

A loyalty program is a marketing strategy designed to encourage customers to continue to shop at or use the services of a business associated with the program. Today, such programs cover most types of commerce, each having varying features and rewards schemes, including in banking, entertainment, hospitality, retailing and travel. A loyalty program typically involves the operator of a particular program setting up an account for a customer of a business associated with the scheme, and then issuing to the customer a loyalty card (variously called rewards card, points card, advantage card, club card, or some other name) which may be a plastic or paper card, visually similar to a credit card, that identifies the card holder as a participant in the program. Cards may have a barcode or magstripe to more easily allow for scanning, although some are chip cards or proximity cards.By presenting a card, customers typically receive either a discount on the current purchase, or an allotment of points that they can use for future purchases. Hence, the card is the visible means of implementing a type of what economists call a two-part tariff. Application forms for cards usually entail agreements by the store concerning customer privacy, typically non-disclosure (by the store) of non-aggregate data about customers. The store uses aggregate data internally (and sometimes externally) as part of its marketing research. Over time the data can reveal, for example, a given customer's favorite brand of beer, or whether he or she is a vegetarian. Where a customer has provided sufficient identifying information, the loyalty card may also be used to access such information to expedite verification during receipt of cheques or dispensing medical prescription preparations, or for other membership privileges such as access to an airport lounge using a frequent-flyer card. In recent years, businesses now offer these loyalty cards in the form of a loyalty app, which means users are less likely to lose their card. Almost all major casino chains also have loyalty cards, which offer members tier credits, reward credits, comps, and other perks based on card members' "theo" from gambling, various demographic data, and spend patterns on various purchases at the casino, within the casino network, and with the casino's partners. Examples of such programs include Caesars Rewards (formerly called Total Rewards) and MGM Resorts International's Mlife.Loyalty programs have been described as a form of centralized virtual currency, one with unidirectional cash flow, since reward points can be exchanged into a good or service but not into cash.

— Wikipedia

Interchange fee

Interchange fee

Interchange fee is a term used in the payment card industry to describe a fee paid between banks for the acceptance of card-based transactions. Usually for sales/services transactions it is a fee that a merchant's bank (the "acquiring bank") pays a customer's bank (the "issuing bank"); and for cash transactions the interchange fee is paid from the issuer to acquirer, often called reverse interchange. In a credit card or debit card transaction, the card-issuing bank in a payment transaction deducts the interchange fee from the amount it pays the acquiring bank that handles a credit or debit card transaction for a merchant. The acquiring bank then pays the merchant the amount of the transaction minus both the interchange fee and an additional, usually smaller, fee for the acquiring bank or independent sales organization (ISO), which is often referred to as a discount rate, an add-on rate, or passthru. For cash withdrawal transactions at ATMs, however, the fees are paid by the card-issuing bank to the acquiring bank (for the maintenance of the machine). Thus, the Interchange Fee is understood to be mainly the compensation for the Issuing Bank for the statement accumulation period and the post-statement 'Grace Period'. In substance, it is best viewed as the discounting of merchants' receivables until the 'Payment Due Date' when the customer settles the bill either from own sources, or the credit line inherent in the card automatically pays it, and the bank starts charging credit card interest on it. These fees are set by the credit card networks, and are the largest component of the various fees that most merchants pay for the privilege of accepting credit cards, representing 70% to 90% of these fees by some estimates, although larger merchants typically pay less as a percentage. Interchange fees have a complex pricing structure, which is based on the card brand, regions or jurisdictions, the type of credit or debit card, the type and size of the accepting merchant, and the type of transaction (e.g. online, in-store, phone order, whether the card is present for the transaction, etc.). Further complicating the rate schedules, interchange fees are typically a flat fee plus a percentage of the total purchase price (including taxes). In the United States, the fee averages approximately 2% of transaction value. In the EU, interchange fees are capped to 0.3% of the transaction for credit cards and to 0.2% for debit cards, while there is no cap for corporate cards.In recent years, interchange fees have become a controversial issue, the subject of regulatory and antitrust investigations. Many large merchants such as Wal-Mart have the ability to negotiate fee prices, and while some merchants prefer cash or PIN-based debit cards, most believe they cannot realistically refuse to accept the major card network–branded cards. This holds true even when their interchange-driven fees exceed their profit margins. Some countries, such as Australia, have established significantly lower interchange fees, although according to a U.S. Government Accountability Office study, the savings enjoyed by merchants were not passed along to consumers. The fees are also the subject of several ongoing lawsuits in the United States.

— Wikipedia

Arrival card

Arrival card

An arrival card, also known as an incoming passenger card, landing card or disembarkation card, is a legal document used by immigration authorities of many countries to obtain information about incoming passenger not provided by the passenger's passport (such as health, criminal record, where they will be staying, purpose of the visit, etc.) and to provide a record of a person's entry into the country. The card may also provide information on health and character requirements for non-citizens entering the country. Some countries require an arrival card for each incoming passenger, while others require one card per family unit, and some only require an arrival card for non-citizens only. Some countries, such as Singapore and Thailand, attach a departure card to the arrival card, which is retained in the alien's passport until their eventual departure. The arrival card can also be combined with a customs declaration, which some countries require incoming passengers to fill out separately. Some countries, such as Malaysia, do not require an arrival or departure card. The procedure of compiling information from immigration cards is no longer required by United States authorities following the introduction of the biometric recording system by the United States Customs and Border Protection. There is minimal cross-border formality between a number of countries, most notably those in the passport-free travel area of Europe's Schengen Zone. The US state of Hawaiʻi requires all visitors, even those on domestic flights, to fill out a card which is sent to the state's department of agriculture.The requirement to produce an arrival card is usually in addition to a requirement to produce a passport or other travel document, to obtain a visa, and sometimes complete a customs declaration.

— Wikipedia

Orson Scott Card

Orson Scott Card

Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951) is an American novelist, critic, public speaker, essayist, and columnist. He writes in several genres but is known best for his science fiction works. His novel Ender's Game (1985) and its sequel Speaker for the Dead (1986) won both Hugo and Nebula Awards, making Card the first author to win the two top American prizes in science fiction literature in consecutive years. A feature film adaptation of Ender's Game, which Card co-produced, was released in 2013. Card also wrote the Locus Fantasy Award-winning series The Tales of Alvin Maker (1987–2003). Card, who is a great-great-grandson of Brigham Young, was born in Richland, Washington, and grew up in Utah and California. While he was a student at Brigham Young University (BYU), his plays were performed on stage. He served in Brazil as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and headed a community theater for two summers. Card had twenty-seven short stories published between 1978 and 1979, and won the John W. Campbell Award for best new writer in 1978. He earned a master's degree in English from the University of Utah in 1981 and wrote novels in science fiction, fantasy, non-fiction, and historical fiction genres in the 1980s. Card continued to write prolifically, and published over 50 novels and over 45 short stories.Card's works were influenced by classic literature, popular fantasy, and science fiction; he often uses tropes from genre fiction. His background as a screenwriter helped Card make his works accessible and character-focused, though some critics dislike his characterization. Card's early fiction is original but contains graphic violence. His fiction often features characters with exceptional gifts who make difficult choices, often with the fate of an entire people at stake. Card has also written political, religious, and social commentary in his columns and other writing. Card's opposition to homosexuality has provoked public criticism and in 2013 it prompted a boycott of the film Ender's Game. Card is a professor of English at Southern Virginia University; he has written two books on creative writing and serves as a judge in the Writers of the Future contest. He is a practicing member of LDS Church and has taught many successful writers at his "literary boot camps"; LDS fiction writers Stephenie Meyer, Brandon Sanderson, and Dave Wolverton have cited his works as a major influence.

— Wikipedia

Cheque

Cheque

Check, chek, n. a money order on a banker payable at demand.—ns. Cheque′-book, a book containing cheque forms given by a bank to its customers; Cheq′uer, Check′er, a chess-board: alternation of colours, as on a chess-board: (pl.) draughts: chess-men.—v.t. to mark in squares of different colours: to variegate: interrupt.—adjs. Cheq′uered, Check′ered, variegated, like a chess-board: varying in character.—ns. Cheq′uer-work, any pattern having alternating squares of different colours; Blank′-cheque, a cheque signed by the owner, but without having the amount to be drawn indicated; Cross′-cheque, an ordinary cheque with two transverse lines drawn across it, which have the effect of making it payable only through a banker. [See Check.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Credit card

Credit card

A credit card is a payment card issued to users as a system of payment. It allows the cardholder to pay for goods and services based on the holder's promise to pay for them. The issuer of the card creates a revolving account and grants a line of credit to the consumer from which the user can borrow money for payment to a merchant or as a cash advance to the user. A credit card is different from a charge card: a charge card requires the balance to be paid in full each month. In contrast, credit cards allow the consumers a continuing balance of debt, subject to interest being charged. A credit card also differs from a cash card, which can be used like currency by the owner of the card. A credit card differs from a charge card also in that a credit card typically involves a third-party entity that pays the seller and is reimbursed by the buyer, whereas a charge card simply defers payment by the buyer until a later date. The size of most credit cards is 3 ⅜ × 2 ⅛ in, conforming to the ISO/IEC 7810 ID-1 standard. Credit cards have an embossed bank card number complying with the ISO/IEC 7812 numbering standard.

— Freebase

Payment card

Payment card

Payment cards are part of a payment system issued by financial institutions, such as a bank, to a customer that enables its owner (the cardholder) to access the funds in the customer's designated bank accounts, or through a credit account and make payments by electronic funds transfer and access automated teller machines (ATMs). Such cards are known by a variety of names including bank cards, ATM cards, MAC (money access cards), client cards, key cards or cash cards. There are a number of types of payment cards, the most common being credit cards and debit cards. Most commonly, a payment card is electronically linked to an account or accounts belonging to the cardholder. These accounts may be deposit accounts or loan or credit accounts, and the card is a means of authenticating the cardholder. However, stored-value cards store money on the card itself and are not necessarily linked to an account at a financial institution. It can also be a smart card that contains a unique card number and some security information such as an expiration date or CVVC (CVV) or with a magnetic strip on the back enabling various machines to read and access information. Depending on the issuing bank and the preferences of the client, this may allow the card to be used as an ATM card, enabling transactions at automatic teller machines; or as a debit card, linked to the client's bank account and able to be used for making purchases at the point of sale; or as a credit card attached to a revolving credit line supplied by the bank. Most payment cards, such as debit and credit cards can also function as ATM cards, although ATM-only cards are also available. Charge and proprietary cards cannot be used as ATM cards. The use of a credit card to withdraw cash at an ATM is treated differently to a POS transaction, usually attracting interest charges from the date of the cash withdrawal. Interbank networks allow the use of ATM cards at ATMs of private operators and financial institutions other than those of the institution that issued the cards. All ATM machines, at a minimum, will permit cash withdrawals of customers of the machine's owner (if a bank-operated machine) and for cards that are affiliated with any ATM network the machine is also affiliated. They will report the amount of the withdrawal and any fees charged by the machine on the receipt. Most banks and credit unions will permit routine account-related banking transactions at the bank's own ATM, including deposits, checking the balance of an account, and transferring money between accounts. Some may provide additional services, such as selling postage stamps. For other types of transactions through telephone or online banking, this may be performed with an ATM card without in-person authentication. This includes account balance inquiries, electronic bill payments, or in some cases, online purchases (see Interac Online). ATM cards can also be used on improvised ATMs such as "mini ATMs", merchants' card terminals that deliver ATM features without any cash drawer. These terminals can also be used as cashless scrip ATMs by cashing the receipts they issue at the merchant's point of sale.

— Wikipedia

Cheque

Cheque

A cheque is a document that orders a payment of money from a bank account. The person writing the cheque, the drawer, usually has a current account or checking account where their money was previously deposited. The drawer writes the various details including the monetary amount, date, and a payee on the cheque, and signs it, ordering their bank, known as the drawee, to pay that person or company the amount of money stated. Cheques are a type of bill of exchange and were developed as a way to make payments without the need to carry large amounts of money. While paper money evolved from promissory notes, another form of negotiable instrument, similar to cheques in that they were originally a written order to pay the given amount to whoever had it in their possession. Technically, a cheque is a negotiable instrument instructing a financial institution to pay a specific amount of a specific currency from a specified transactional account held in the drawer's name with that institution. Both the drawer and payee may be natural persons or legal entities. Specifically, cheques are order instruments, and are not in general payable simply to the bearer but must be paid to the payee. In some countries, such as the US, the payee may endorse the cheque, allowing them to specify a third party to whom it should be paid.

— Freebase

Petty cash

Petty cash

Petty cash is a small amount of discretionary funds in the form of cash used for expenditures where it is not sensible to make any disbursement by cheque, because of the inconvenience and costs of writing, signing and then cashing the cheque. The most common way of accounting for petty cash expenditures is to use the imprest system. The initial fund would be created by issuing a cheque for the desired amount. An amount of $100 would typically be sufficient for most small business needs as the expenses to be covered are for small amounts. The bookkeeping entry for this initial fund would be to debit Petty Cash and credit bank account. As expenditures are made, the custodian of the fund will reimburse employees and receive a petty cash voucher with a receipt/invoice attached in return. At any given time the total of cash on hand plus reimbursed vouchers must equal the original fund. When the fund gets low, e.g. $20 remaining, the custodian requests a top up and submits the vouchers for reimbursement. Assuming the vouchers add up to $80, an $80 top up cheque is issued and an $80 debit towards office expenses is recorded. Once the cheque is cashed, the custodian again has cash at the original amount $100.

— Freebase

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. thick
  • B. fibrous
  • C. threadlike
  • D. thready