Synonyms containing climb into

We've found 44,837 synonyms:

Nawang Sherpa

Nawang Sherpa

Nawang Sherpa became the first person to climb Mount Everest with a prosthetic leg by reaching the summit on May 16, 2004 (see Mount Everest Timeline and Trivia). He is also the first amputee to reach the summit of Mount Everest on his first attempt, and the first disabled person from Asia to stand on the summit. Nawang, a trans-tibial amputee, is a native of Tapting in the Himalayan region of Solukhumbu in Nepal. He grew up with a love of mountains and a dream to climb Mount Everest some day. He had completed part of his training to become a high altitude Sherpa guide when he was injured in a traffic accident in Kathmandu in 2000. Despite months of hospitalization, his left leg required amputation, ending his climbing career and dream to climb Everest. A group of Nawang's American friends responded to his plight, and arranged for him to fly to California where he received a donation of his first sturdy prosthetic leg from the Orthopaedic Surgery Department of the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) in May 2001. He had arrived from Nepal on tattered crutches; a month later he returned walking strongly on two legs. In the spring of 2002, he met the famous double amputee and high-altitude mountaineer/airline pilot Ed Hommer of Minnesota in Kathmandu as Ed returned from an attempt to climb of Mount Everest. They became friends and Ed invited Nawang to join him on his next Everest expedition which was planned for 2003. Unfortunately, Ed Hommer was killed by rockfall while training on Mount Rainier in the autumn of 2002. However, in 2004 Nawang's friend Tom McMillan of the San Francisco Bay Area received an opportunity to climb Mount Everest and immediately invited Nawang to climb with him as his climbing partner. This was the genesis of their very successful 2004 Friendship Beyond Borders Expedition. The High Exposure Foundation, established in the 1990s in Minnesota by Ed Hommer, offered to help Nawang achieve his Everest dream with donations of high-tech prosthetic equipment suitable for mountain climbing and trekking. Ed Hommer's prosthetist, Tom Halvorson, oversaw Nawang's fittings and coached him on how to hike and climb at extreme altitudes safely. This enabled Nawang to successfully trek across the high Himalayan Khumbu region of Nepal for days to reach Everest basecamp, climb steep snow and ice slopes during the many weeks of acclimatization ascents partially up the mountain and back, then make the final continuous push to the summit and back during a perfect "weather window" on the mountain. Each day he had to carry—in addition to his food, water, extra clothes, and other supplies—a spare prosthetic leg in case of problems. Another extraordinary aspect of his accomplishment is that Nawang chose not to do any physical training before the expedition, as he was concerned about possibly damaging his knee or prosthetic leg. In addition, nausea during his summit push prevented him from eating during the three-day climb up to the summit and the two-day descent back to basecamp. During the April 2006 Friendship Beyond Borders expedition, Nawang made a partial ascent of the sixth highest peak in the world, Cho Oyu, on the Nepal-Tibet border about 12 miles from Mount Everest. For that climb, Nawang and the team were assisted by Nawang's younger brother Ang Dawa Sherpa and friend Nima Gombu Sherpa. Record snowfall amounts and logistical problems prevented the team from reaching the summit that year. Nawang has received many honors for his achievement, including the Everest Award from the Nepal Mountaineering Association and the prestigious Suprabal Gorakha Dakshin Bahu (Third) Gold Medal from His Majesty the King of Nepal.

— Wikipedia

plunged

plunged

to (cause someone or something to) move or fall suddenly and often a long way forward, down, or into something;to become lower in value or level very suddenly and quickly;a sudden movement or fall forward, down, or into something;a sudden and large fall in value or level;to move or fall suddenly forward, down, or into something;If a value or price plunges, it suddenly becomes less;If a person or group plunges into an activity, or a place plunges into a condition, it suddenly experiences it;If you plunge into an activity or are plunged into it, you suddenly get very involved in it.If a person or thing is plunged into a particular state or situation, or if they plunge into it, they are suddenly in that state or situation.If you plunge an object into something, you push it quickly or violently into it.to fall quickly from a high position:To move, or to move something downwards:fall,lower,come down;to make someone or something fall quickly from a high position;to slope downwards suddenly; if an amount or level plunges, it suddenly becomes much lower; to move quickly in an uncontrolled way, or to make someone or something move in this way; to suddenly put someone or something in a much less successful situation, or to be suddenly put in such a situation;to cause to penetrate or enter quickly and forcibly into something; to cause to enter a state or course of action usually suddenly, unexpectedly, or violently ; to thrust or cast oneself into or as if into water;to become pitched or thrown headlong or violently forward and downward,to move oneself in such a manner,to descend or dip suddenly.dive, pitch, sound.

— Editors Contribution

Into

Into

indicating the passing of a thing from one form, condition, or state to another; as, compound substances may be resolved into others which are more simple; ice is convertible into water, and water into vapor; men are more easily drawn than forced into compliance; we may reduce many distinct substances into one mass; men are led by evidence into belief of truth, and are often enticed into the commission of crimes'into; she burst into tears; children are sometimes frightened into fits; all persons are liable to be seduced into error and folly

— Webster Dictionary

stovepiping

stovepiping

retrieval of information from unconnected databases; the situation that exists when it is necessary to climb out of one database in order to climb down into another; sometimes used for protection against wandering hackers

— Princeton's WordNet

Ascend

Ascend

as-send′, v.i. to climb or mount up: to rise, literally or figuratively: to go backwards in the order of time.—v.t. to climb or go up on: to mount.—adjs. Ascend′able, Ascend′ible.—Ascending rhythm, in prosody, a rhythm in which the arsis follows the thesis, as an iambic or anapæstic rhythm: opposed to descending rhythms, as the trochaic and dactylic. [L. ascendĕre, ascensumad, and scandĕre, to climb.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Climb

Climb

klīm, v.i. or v.t. to ascend or mount by clutching with the hands and feet: to ascend with difficulty: to mount.—adj. Climb′able, capable of being climbed.—ns. Climb′er, one who or that which climbs: (pl.) an old-fashioned popular title for several orders of birds whose feet are mainly adapted for climbing: (bot.) those plants which, having weak stems, seek support from other objects, chiefly from other plants, in order to ascend from the ground; Climb′ing. [A.S. climban; cf. Ger. klimmen; conn. with Clamber and Cleave, to stick.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Jack Durrance

Jack Durrance

John Randall Durrance (July 20, 1912 – November 7, 2003) was a pioneering American rock climber and mountaineer. He learned to climb while attending high school in Germany, and later founded the Dartmouth Mountaineering Club in 1936 while attending Dartmouth College. Some of his classic first ascents include the North Face of the Grand Teton and the "Durrance Route" on Devils Tower. His successful completion of the Grand's Exum Ridge and West Face, along with his contributions to the development of bouldering, stand among his other climbing achievements. On the 1939 American Karakoram expedition to K2 he attempted to climb K2, the second tallest mountain in the world. He became embroiled in controversy after four members of the expedition died and the expedition leader, Fritz Wiessner, blamed Durrance. A book seeking to shed light on the event, K2: The 1939 Tragedy, was published in 1993. The authors, William Putnam, a former president of the Alpine Club, and Andy Kauffman, a former director, relied on a Durrance diary that surfaced for the first time fifty years after the event to place responsibility for the deaths on Wiessner. Ed Viesturs, in his book "K2: Life and Death on the World's Most Dangerous Mountain", revisits all the available documentation and suggest instead that the unplanned decision to decommission all lower camps played a major role in the tragedy. During the 1939 climb, Durrance saved the life of Chap Cranmer who was suffering from pulmonary edema. Mr. Cranmer's family thanked Durrance by getting him an internship with Dr. James J. Waring, an international expert on tuberculosis. Durrance took the internship and later became a pulmonary physician at a Denver hospital. In addition to climbing and medicine another passion of his was hybridizing irises. Durrance died on November 7, 2003, aged 91, survived by his widow, Stella Coulter Durrance and their five children.

— Wikipedia

Illiniza

Illiniza

The Illinizas are a pair of volcanic mountains that are located to the south of Quito, Ecuador. They are located in the Illinizas Ecological Reserve (Reserva Ecológica Los Illinizas). These twin mountains are separated by a saddle that is about a kilometer long. The peaks are among the highest in Ecuador, with Illiniza Sur standing slightly taller than Illiniza Norte, its northern counterpart, at 5248 metres and 5126 metres respectively. Most guidebooks (for example, Lonely Planet Ecuador, Ecuador: A Climbing Guide) spell the mountain with only one "l" as in Iliniza. The name Illinizas is derived from the Kunza words for "masculine hill."Whilst Illiniza Sur (the southern peak) is a more difficult climb due to its glacial nature, Illiniza Norte requires some climbing expertise, and may be climbed as a trekking peak. A guide is still recommended, however, as the path becomes hard to navigate as it approaches the summit. The Illinizas are excellent mountains for acclimatization to altitude, and are frequently used as a preparatory climb to higher peaks such as Cotopaxi, Chimborazo and Cayambe.There is a rustic refuge located between the north and south peaks. It can be reached in one hour by car from El Chaupi, followed by a three-hour climb. The refuge has gas stoves, pots and pans and bunk beds. It is necessary to bring warm sleeping bags and food, but water is available to be boiled. The Englishman Edward Whymper tried and failed twice to make the first ascent of Iliniza Sur. It was climbed for the first time in 1880 by his two Italian guides Jean-Antoine Carrel and Louis Carrel. The first ascent of Iliniza Norte was made in 1912 by the Ecuadorians Nicolás Martínez and Alejandro Villavicencio.

— Wikipedia

Rate of climb

Rate of climb

In aeronautics, the rate of climb is an aircraft's vertical speed - the rate of change in altitude. In most ICAO member countries, this is usually expressed in feet per minute. Elsewhere, it is commonly expressed in metres per second. The rate of climb in an aircraft is indicated with a vertical speed indicator or instantaneous vertical speed indicator. The rate of decrease in altitude is referred to as the rate of descent or sink rate. A decrease in altitude corresponds with a negative rate of climb.

— Freebase

Patta

Patta

Patta Killa, also known as Vishramgad, is situated between Nasik and Ahmadnagar in Maharashtra. Shivaji Maharaj once visited and rested there. The residents of Patta Killa are known as Pattekar, meaning residents of Fort Patta. Patta was used to be at the border of the Swarajya. When shivaji maharaj was coming after winning Jalnapur, the mughal army trapped him from three sides. It was because of the mastery of Bahirji Naik who was the head of the detective department that shivaji maharaj was able to reach Patta safely. Height of Patta fort from Mean sea Level 1392 Meters latitude 19°42'35.85"N longitude 19°42'35.85"N There is a Rajwada on fort which is ruined because of lack of care. We can also see Chor Darwaja on fort. Now construction of Devi Mandir is going on fort. It is most likely to complete in 2012. Patta fort has 3 base villages. 1From Pattawadi village:Pattawadi is situated around 35 km from Akole the main Taluka place on the road going towards Taaked.From Pattawadi village,Patta fort is hardly 250 meters climb. 2From Taaked:Taaked village is located in Igatpuri Taluka Nasik District and from here,you need to trek till Kokanwadi village and climb up to the southern end of Patta fort.From Taaked,Patta fort is about 600 meters climb.Taaked is also famous for its ancient temple of Jataayu in the Ramayana.This temple here is called as Sarvateerth.

— Freebase

Free climbing

Free climbing

Free climbing is a specific rock climbing term that refers to climbs in which climbers do not employ climbing protection such as ropes, tri-cams, nuts, and other climbing equipment to aid in ascending the climb, although, such equipment may be used to protect against injury during falls. The term free climbing originally meant "free from aid". Free climbing includes solo climbing, traditional climbing, sport climbing and bouldering. In contrast, in aid climbing, climbing equipment is used to assist the climber in ascending the climb and can include a means for pulling the climber upward or providing points where the climber can stand on equipment to assist in the climb.

— Freebase

Humboldt Peak

Humboldt Peak

Humboldt Peak, elevation 14,070 ft, is a summit in the Sangre de Cristo Range of southern Colorado. The peak is in the San Isabel National Forest southwest of Westcliffe. It is the least challenging climb of the Crestone group of fourteeners, which include Crestone Peak, Crestone Needle, and Kit Carson Peak. The standard route on the peak is an exhausting hike along a trail of tears, with ache-inducing rock scrambling near the summit. The trail climbs the peak from the South Colony Lakes basin, accessed from the east side of the range. This basin is a popular site that is also the base for most climbs of Crestone Peak and Crestone Needle. A very rugged four-wheel drive road follows the South Colony drainage to near the Lakes; however, this road will be closed halfway up on October 13, 2009. There is a lower parking lot for two-wheel drive access at the San Isabel National Forest boundary. The climb involves 4,464 feet of elevation gain in a 14-mile round trip when done from the two-wheel drive access point, but only 3,100 feet of gain in a 6-mile round trip from the current high-clearance four-wheel drive access point. As of 8/30/2007, 2WD lot has been moved back. From here climb involves 5,200 feet of elevation gain in an 18-mile round trip. When hiking Humboldt be sure to stay right on the ridge because the left is the north face and drops steeply.

— Freebase

five kingdom system

five kingdom system

Once upon a time, all living things were lumped together into two kingdoms, namely plants and animals (at least, that's how I learned it). Animals included every living thing that moved, ate, and grew to a certain size and stopped growing. Plants included every living thing that did not move or eat and that continued to grow throughout life. It became very difficult to group some living things into one or the other, so early in the past century the two kingdoms were expanded into five kingdoms: Protista (the single-celled eukaryotes); Fungi (fungus and related organisms); Plantae (the plants); Animalia (the animals); Monera (the prokaryotes). Many biologists now recognize six distinct kingdoms, dividing Monera into the Eubacteria and Archeobacteria. All I can say is that the sytem holds true for this week, at least. It might even hold up for a century or two. Accepted systems of classification have changed at a far faster pace than the species have taken to evolve, that's for certain. Kingdoms are divided into categories called phyla, each phylum is divided into classes, each class into orders, each order into families, each family into genera, and each genus into species. A species represents one type of organism, such as dog, tiger shark, Ameoba proteus (the common amoeba), Homo sapiens (us), or Acer palmatum (Japanese maple). Note that species names should be underlined or written in italics. Classifying larger organisms into kingdoms is usually easy, but in a microenvironment it can be tricky. If you have had a little biology, a good exercise is to describe individual living things, and to try to classify them as to kingdom. Individuals are single-celled, may or may not move, have a cell wall, have no chloroplasts or other organelles, and have no nucleus. Monera are usually very tiny, although one type, namely the blue-green bacteria, look like algae. They are filamentous and quite long, green, but have no visible structure inside the cells. No visible feeding mechanism. They absorb nutrients through the cell wall or produce their own by photosynthesis. Protists are single-celled and usually move by cilia, flagella, or by amoeboid mechanisms. There is usually no cell wall, although some forms may have a cell wall. They have organelles including a nucleus and may have chloroplasts, so some will be green and others won't be. They are small, although many are big enough to be recognized in a dissecting microscope or even with a magnifying glass. Nutrien

— Editors Contribution

Enter

Enter

to get admission; to introduce one's self; to penetrate; to form or constitute a part; to become a partaker or participant; to share; to engage; -- usually with into; sometimes with on or upon; as, a ball enters into the body; water enters into a ship; he enters into the plan; to enter into a quarrel; a merchant enters into partnership with some one; to enter upon another's land; the boy enters on his tenth year; to enter upon a task; lead enters into the composition of pewter

— Webster Dictionary

Descend

Descend

dē-send′, v.i. to climb down: to pass from a higher to a lower place or condition: to pass from general to particulars: to fall upon or invade: to be derived.—v.t. to go down upon: to go to the bottom of.—n. Descend′ant, one who descends, as offspring from an ancestor.—adjs. Descend′ent, descending or going down: proceeding from an ancestor; Descend′ible, that may descend or be descended: capable of transmission by inheritance, heritable.—p.adj. Descend′ing.—n. Descen′sion.—adj. Descen′sional.—n. Descent′, act of descending: transmission by succession: motion or progress downward: slope: a falling upon or invasion: derivation from an ancestor: a generation, a degree in genealogy: descendants collectively.—Descent from the cross, a picture representing Christ being taken down from the cross. [Fr. descendre—L. descendĕrede, down, scandĕre, to climb.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "miserable"?
  • A. comfy
  • B. measly
  • C. misfortunate
  • D. pathetic