Synonyms containing cod-banger

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Atlantic cod

Atlantic cod

The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a benthopelagic fish of the family Gadidae, widely consumed by humans. It is also commercially known as cod or codling. Dry cod may be prepared as unsalted stockfish, as cured salt cod or clipfish.In the western Atlantic Ocean, cod has a distribution north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and around both coasts of Greenland and the Labrador Sea; in the eastern Atlantic, it is found from the Bay of Biscay north to the Arctic Ocean, including the Baltic Sea, the North Sea, Sea of the Hebrides, areas around Iceland and the Barents Sea. The largest individual on record was 1.8 m (6 ft) long and weighed 96 kg (211 lb), but usually the cod is between 61 cm (24 in) and 1.2 m (4 ft) long and weighs up to 40 kg (88 lb). Males and females are similar in size and weight.Atlantic cod can live for 25 years, and usually attain sexual maturity between ages two and four, although cod in the northeast Arctic can take as long as eight years to mature fully. Colouring is brown or green, with spots on the dorsal side, shading to silver ventrally. A stripe along its lateral line (used to detect vibrations) is clearly visible. Its habitat ranges from the shoreline down to the continental shelf. Several cod stocks collapsed in the 1990s (declined by >95% of maximum historical biomass) and have failed to fully recover even with the cessation of fishing. This absence of the apex predator has led to a trophic cascade in many areas. Many other cod stocks remain at risk. The Atlantic cod is labelled vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

— Wikipedia

Cod

Cod

Cod is the common name for the genus Gadus of demersal fishes, belonging to the family Gadidae. Cod is also used as part of the common name for a number of other fish species, and there are species suggested to belong to genus Gadus that are not called cod. The two most important species of cod are the Atlantic cod, which lives in the colder waters and deeper sea regions throughout the North Atlantic, and the Pacific cod, found in both eastern and western regions of the northern Pacific. Gadus morhua was named by Linnaeus in 1758. Cod is popular as a food with a mild flavour and a dense, flaky white flesh. Cod livers are processed to make cod liver oil, an important source of vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids. Young Atlantic cod or haddock prepared in strips for cooking is called scrod. In the United Kingdom, Atlantic cod is one of the most common ingredients in fish and chips, along with haddock and plaice. It is also frequently consumed in Portugal, Spain, Italy, France and Brazil. Cod flesh is moist and flaky when cooked and is white in colour.

— Freebase

Cape Cod

Cape Cod

Cape Cod is a cape in the easternmost portion of the state of Massachusetts, in the Northeastern United States. Today it is co-extensive with Barnstable County, and is defined by the towns along the Cape Cod Canal, and those to the east along the peninsula all the way to Provincetown. Several small islands right off Cape Cod, including Monomoy Island, Monomoscoy Island, Popponesset Island, and Seconsett Island, are also in Barnstable County. The Cape's historic and maritime character and ample beaches attract heavy tourism during the summer months. Cape Cod was formed as the recessional moraine of a glacier at the end of the last ice age, resulting in the peninsula that stretches into the Atlantic Ocean. In 1914, the Cape Cod Canal was cut through the base or isthmus of the peninsula, turning nearly all of Cape Cod into what would technically be described as an island. One of the biggest barrier islands in the world, Cape Cod shields much of the Massachusetts coastline from North Atlantic storm waves. This protection erodes the Cape's shoreline at the expense of its cliffs, while protecting towns from Fairhaven to Marshfield. By road, all vehicles entering Cape Cod must cross over the Cape Cod Canal via the Sagamore Bridge or the Bourne Bridge. The two bridges are parallel some four miles apart, with the Bourne Bridge to the west, and the Sagamore to the east. In addition, the Cape Cod Canal Railroad Bridge carries railway freight and limited passenger services onto the Cape.

— Freebase

Notothenia microlepidota

Notothenia microlepidota

Notothenia microlepidota, the black cod or smallscaled cod, is a species of cod icefish native to the Pacific waters around New Zealand and Macquarie Island. This species can reach a length of 70 centimetres TL. It is a commercially important species. The juveniles are silvery in appearance with a pronounced tail fork. The adult has a less pronounced fork in the tail, with body colors of silver, yellow and reddish-brown. The scales are very small, and there are two lateral lines which have a considerable overlap. Being a sub-Antarctic species, the black cod has special adaptations such as antifreeze proteins in its blood, as well as adipose tissues to offset its lack of swim bladders, giving it neutral buoyancy. Sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, is occasionally called black cod as well, but it is not a true cod. In New Zealand, Maori cod is also known as "black cod".

— Freebase

Cod

Cod

kod, Codfish, kod′fish, n. a species of fish much used as food, found in the northern seas.—ns. Cod′-fisher; Cod′-fish′ery; Cod′-fish′ing; Cod′ling, a small cod.—Cod-liver oil, a medicinal oil extracted from the fresh liver of the common cod. [Ety. dub.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pacific cod

Pacific cod

The Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus, is an important commercial food species. It is also known as gray cod or grey cod, and grayfish or greyfish. It has three separate dorsal fins, and the catfish-like whiskers on its lower jaw. In appearance, it is similar to the Atlantic cod. A bottom dweller, it is found mainly along the continental shelf and upper slopes with a range around the rim of the North Pacific Ocean, from the Yellow Sea to the Bering Strait, along the Aleutian Islands, and south to about Los Angeles, down to the depths of 900 meters. May grow up to 1 m and weigh up to 15 kg. It is found in huge schools. Molecular genetic analyses strongly suggest that Pacific cod and Greenland cod from Greenland–the Arctic ocean are the same species; G. ogac is then a junior synonym of G. macrocephalus. Nevertheless, ITIS still lists Gadus ogac as a valid name. This change would greatly expand the geographic range of Pacific cod.

— Freebase

Boreogadus saida

Boreogadus saida

Boreogadus saida, known as the polar cod or as the Arctic cod, is a fish of the cod family Gadidae, related to the true cod. Note that there is also another fish species for which both the common names Arctic cod and polar cod are used, Arctogadus glacialis. Boreogadus saida has a slender body, deeply forked tail, projecting mouth and a small whisker on its chin. It is plainly coloured with brownish spots and a silvery body. It grows to a length of 40 centimetres TL. This species is found further north than any other fish with a distribution spanning the Arctic seas off northern Russia, Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. This fish is most commonly found at the water's surface, but is also known to travel at depths greater than 900 m. The polar cod is known to frequent river mouths. It is a hardy fish that survives best at temperatures of 0–4 °C but may tolerate colder temperatures owing to the presence of antifreeze protein compounds in its blood. They group in large schools in ice-free waters. Boreogadus saida feeds on plankton and krill. It is in turn the primary food source for narwhals, belugas, ringed seals and seabirds. They are fished commercially in Russia.

— Freebase

Sleepy cod

Sleepy cod

The sleepy cod, Oxyeleotris lineolatus, is a medium-sized freshwater fish, native to tropical regions of northern Australia. Sleepy cod generally weigh up to 3 kg. They are very common in waterways across northern Australia. They are plain brown coloured fishes. They are sedentary in nature. They are one of the most favoured freshwater fish in Australia for eating, having white, flaky flesh, low fat content and a mild flavour. There are other two species of sleepy cod, although they are not as common as O.lineolatus: Oxyeleotris selheimi and O.gyrinoides, both occupying some parts of northern Australia. All species have similar table qualities. The sleepy cod are members of the order Perciformes, and thus unrelated to the true cod. They are not closely related to the Australian freshwater cods like Murray cod either, being in a separate family.

— Freebase

Scrod

Scrod

Scrod was originally any young cod, haddock, or other whitefish, split and boned. It is a term credited to chefs at Boston’s Parker House Hotel, also the originator of Parker House rolls. Scrod is a staple, even in 2013, in many coastal New England and Atlantic Canadian seafood and fish markets and as many restaurants, whether specializing in seafood or not. A popular acronym used in New England for scrod is "seaman’s catch received on deck", which implies whatever type of "whitefish" caught that day would be used universally for cooking. A dubious folk etymology holds that the term comes from the acronym “small cod remaining on dock”, but it more likely comes from the obsolete Dutch schroot, "piece cut off", or from scrawed, from Cornish dialect. Other folk expressions explain that when spelled "schrod" it is a haddock, and is otherwise cod. In Dutch, schrod means "to fillet", another possible etymology for "scrod". Scrawing was a method for preparing a fish for cooking by splitting it open, drying it in the sun and/or salting it overnight to remove moisture, and then broiling it when dry. Cooking a young cod or the split tail of a large cod, with the same preparation method as scrawing, has been labeled as "scrod" in a cookbook published as early as 1851. According to a friend of Daniel Webster, Webster greatly enjoyed scrawed cod for breakfast.

— Freebase

Blue cod

Blue cod

Blue cod, Parapercis colias, is a temperate marine fish of the family Pinguipedidae. It is also known variously as Boston blue cod, New Zealand cod, sand perch or its Māori names rawaru and pakirikiri. It is exclusively found in New Zealand in shallow waters around the rocky coasts of up to the depth of 150 m, though it is far more common south of Cook Strait. It is bluish green to blue black above with white toward the belly. Large examples are usually greenish blue in coloration, while smaller ones are blotched in varying shades of brown. An adult may grow to 60 cm in length and weigh from one to three kg. It feeds mainly on small fish and crabs. Blue cod is strongly territorial. Spawning takes place in southern spring. Blue cod can also change sex from female to male. It is a plump fish which produces good fillets, but it has a very low oil content. It can be served battered, crumbed, pan-fried or baked. It is an important recreational species in the South Island and is commercially harvested. Blue cod populations are managed sustainably under New Zealand’s fisheries quota management system, although are becoming scarce in some small areas due to fishing pressure. Annual catch range is between 1,300 to 2,000 tonnes.

— Freebase

Cape Cod Canal

Cape Cod Canal

The Cape Cod Canal is an artificial waterway traversing the narrow neck of land that joins Cape Cod to mainland Massachusetts. Part of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, the canal is approximately 7 miles, or 11.3 km long of which most follow tidal rivers that are widened and deepened into a ship channel. and connects Cape Cod Bay in the north to Buzzards Bay in the south. The town of Sandwich, Massachusetts is near the Cape Cod Bay entrance and the Massachusetts Maritime Academy lies near its entrance to Buzzards Bay. The approximate 20,000 annual users of the canal save about 135 miles by not using the route around Cape Cod. A swift running Canal current changes direction every six hours and can reach a maximum velocity of 5.2 miles per hour, during the receding ebb tide. The canal is maintained by the United States Army Corps of Engineers and has no toll fees. The canal is 480 feet wide and has authorized depth of 32 feet at mean low water. The canal is spanned by the Cape Cod Canal Railroad Bridge and two highway bridges—the Bourne and the Sagamore. Traffic lights govern the approach of vessels over 65 feet, and are located at either end of the canal.

— Freebase

Atlantic cod

Atlantic cod

The Atlantic cod is a well-known benthopelagic food fish belonging to the family Gadidae. It is also commercially known as cod, codling or haberdine. In the western Atlantic Ocean, cod has a distribution north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and around both coasts of Greenland; in the eastern Atlantic, it is found from the Bay of Biscay north to the Arctic Ocean, including the Baltic Sea, the North Sea, Sea of the Hebrides, areas around Iceland and the Barents Sea. It can grow to 2 meters in length and weigh up to 96 kilograms. It can live for 25 years and sexual maturity is generally attained between ages two and four, but can be as late as eight years in the northeast Arctic. Colouring is brown to green, with spots on the dorsal side, shading to silver ventrally. A lateral line is clearly visible. Its habitat ranges from the shoreline down to the continental shelf. Several cod stocks collapsed in the 1990s and have failed to recover even with the cessation of fishing. This absence of the apex predator has led to a trophic cascade in many areas. Many other cod stocks remain at risk. The "Atlantic cod" is labelled VU on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

— Freebase

Cape Cod Bay

Cape Cod Bay

Cape Cod Bay is a large bay of the Atlantic Ocean adjacent to the U.S. state of Massachusetts. Measuring 604 square miles below a line drawn from Brant Rock in Marshfield to Race Point in Provincetown, Massachusetts, it is enclosed by Cape Cod to the south and east, and Plymouth County, Massachusetts, to the west. To the north of Cape Cod Bay lie Massachusetts Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Cape Cod Bay is the southernmost extremity of the Gulf of Maine. Cape Cod Bay is one of the bays adjacent to Massachusetts that give it the name Bay State. The others are Narragansett Bay, Buzzards Bay, and Massachusetts Bay.

— Freebase

Collect on delivery

Collect on delivery

Collect on delivery is a financial transaction where the payment of products and/or services received is done at the time of actual delivery rather than paid-for in advance. The term is mainly applied to consumer products purchased from a third party, where payment is made to or collected by the deliverer from the recipient rather than the sender, in the way that a collect call is also charged to the recipient instead of the caller. The delivery company in turn remits the charge for the item itself to the company which shipped it, keeping only the portion which it charged for the shipping service. This type of transaction is better known as cash on delivery. However, as other forms of payment became more common, the word "cash" was replaced with the word "collect" to incorporate transactions with checks, credit cards or debit cards. Even with this, COD has become much less common now, and most companies will not ship this way. Originally, COD delivery was made when a company owns its own transportation means. That way the delivery person can collect on site. However, because USPS, UPS, FedEx, OnTrac, and other commercial shipping companies are often cheaper, most companies use COD to mean that the bill for the product is delivered with the product, and payment is expected immediately. Because of the commonality of credit cards and instant payment methods through the Internet, COD purchasing has become obsolete in most cases in the United States. However, it remains a standard method of payment for ordering products and services produced quickly and near the point of delivery; this is particularly common with the ordering of food, and it is the standard model for pizza delivery services, though some pizza restaurants require a credit card number before they will send a delivery, due to fraud and prank callers. But it helps to establish the credibility of online retailer as the consumer pays only after taking delivery of ordered item. COD remains in general use in other countries, for example, Japan.

— Freebase

Arctogadus

Arctogadus

Arctogadus glacialis, known also with ambiguous common names Arctic cod and polar cod, is an Arctic species of fish in the cod family Gadidae, related to the true cod (genus Gadus). Arctogadus glacialis is found in icy water. They grow to about 30 cm long, and are favorite food of narwhals and other arctic whales.

— Wikipedia

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