Synonyms containing cod-banger

We've found 329 synonyms:

Cod

Cod

kod, n. a husk or shell containing seeds: the scrotum.—adjs. Cod′ded, enclosed in a cod; Cod′ding (Shak.), wanton.—n. Cod′-piece, a baggy appendage worn in front of the tight hose of the middle ages. [A.S. codd, a small bag.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Code

Code

kōd, n. a collection or digest of laws: a system of rules and regulations: a system of signs used in the army.—ns. Codificā′tion; Codi′fīer, Cod′ist, one who codifies.—v.t. Cod′ify, to put into the form of a code: to digest: to systematise:—pr.p. cod′ifying; pa.p. cod′ified.—Code telegram, a telegram whose text in itself has no meaning, but where the words are merely arbitrary symbols for other words known to the receiver.—The Code, esp. the rules and regulations regarding government schools and teachers. [Fr. code—L. codex.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cape Cod Knockabout

Cape Cod Knockabout

A Cape Cod Knockabout, or Knockabout, is a one-design class of 18-foot sail boat sailed primarily out of Upper Cape harbors in Massachusetts, USA. Knockabouts were designed by Charles S. Gurney and were popular in the 1940s and well into the 1970s with fleets of 50-60 boats at the annual regatta of the Knockabout Class. There are still active racing fleets in Megansett, Waquoit,Lewis Bay, and Woods Hole. There is also a small racing fleet at the Split Rock Yacht Club in Essex, New York, on Lake Champlain. There are many, many knockabouts throughout Southern New England that are still used for pleasure sailing. The Town of Yarmouth Recreation Dept. owns and runs the Lewis Bay fleet where most of their 15 boats are used for sail training. Hundreds of sailors of all ages have gone through the Yarmouth program using the knockabout to learn on. Yarmouth also maintains a select group of their knockabouts for their racing program. Thirteen to sixteen Knockabouts race in Woods Hole Harbor every Wednesday, with a ladies race on Thursday,and a Spinnaker race on Sunday afternoons. The Cape Cod Knockabout Association holds an annual regatta each summer which is held at one of the above four Cape Cod locations on a rotating basis. Nearly 20 boats attend this regatta each year. Local fleets are generally increasing their numbers. Cape Cod Ship Building in Wareham manufactures the boat.

— Freebase

Sablefish

Sablefish

The sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, is one of two members of the fish family Anoplopomatidae and the only species in the Anoplopoma genus. In English, common names for it include sable, black cod, blue cod, bluefish, candlefish, coal cod, coalfish, beshow and skil, although many of these names also refer to other, unrelated, species. In the USA, FDA accepts only "sablefish" as the Acceptable Market Name; ‘black cod” is considered a vernacular name and should not be used as a Statement of Identity for this species. The sable fish is found in muddy sea beds in the North Pacific at depths of 300 to 2,700 m and is commercially important to Japan. The white flesh of the sablefish is soft-textured and mild flavored. It is considered a delicacy in many countries. When cooked its flaky texture is similar to Patagonian toothfish. The meat has a high fat content and can be prepared in many ways including baking, broiling, grilling, smoking, frying or served as sushi.

— Freebase

Cape Codder

Cape Codder

The Cape Codder was a passenger train operated by Amtrak between Washington, DC and Hyannis, Massachusetts on Cape Cod. It ran seasonally on summer weekends to serve the Cape Cod tourist trade. Its weekly trip arrived in Hyannis Friday evening and returned Sunday morning. It used the trackage of the historic New Haven Railroad, which provided service to the Cape, from New York City and from Boston, until 1959, when year-round passenger service ended on Cape Cod. Prior to 1960 the New Haven Railroad operated summertime daily service between New York City and Cape Cod with trains operating under the names Day Cape Codder and The Neptune. There was also an overnight train known as the The Night Cape Codder which offered sleeping car service between between New York and Hyannis/Wood Hole.

— Freebase

Massachusetts Bay

Massachusetts Bay

Massachusetts Bay, also called Mass Bay, is a bay on the Atlantic Ocean which forms the distinctive shape of the coastline of the U.S. state of Massachusetts. It extends from Plymouth Harbor on the south to Cape Ann on the north, a distance of 42 miles. It is triangular in shape, the north and south shores inclining toward each other until at the entrance to Boston Harbor they are about five miles apart. The depth from the base of the triangle to Boston Harbor is about 21 miles. The bay's westernmost point is situated at Boston. The northern shore is rocky and irregular, the southern low, marshy, and sandy. Along the shores are a number of capes and headlands, and off the coast a number of small islands, especially in the entrance to Boston Harbor. The principal inlets are: on the north coast, Gloucester Harbor, Nahant Bay, Salem Harbor, Marblehead Harbor, and Lynn Harbor; on the west, Boston Harbor, Dorchester Bay, and Quincy Bay; on the south coast, Hingham Bay. Massachusetts Bay is itself part of the Gulf of Maine, which reaches from Cape Cod up to Nova Scotia. Just south is Cape Cod Bay. Cape Cod Bay is sometimes construed as part of Massachusetts Bay; under this interpretation, the name "Massachusetts Bay" denotes the entire rectangular area of ocean between Cape Ann and Cape Cod.

— Freebase

Arctogadus glacialis

Arctogadus glacialis

Arctogadus glacialis, known as the Arctic cod or as the polar cod, is an Arctic species of fish in the cod family Gadidae, related to the true cod.

— Freebase

Stockfish

Stockfish

Stockfish is unsalted fish, especially cod, dried by cold air and wind on wooden racks on the foreshore, called "hjell". The drying of food is the world's oldest known preservation method, and dried fish has a storage life of several years. The method is cheap and effective in suitable climates; the work can be done by the fisherman and family, and the resulting product is easily transported to market. Cod is the most common fish used in stockfish production, while other whitefish, such as pollock, haddock, ling and tusk, are used to a lesser degree. Over the centuries, several variants of dried fish have evolved. The stockfish category is often wrongly mixed with the clipfish, or salted cod, category where the fish is salted before drying. After 2–3 weeks in salt the fish has salt-matured, and is transformed from wet salted fish to clipfish through a drying process. The salted fish was earlier dried on rocks on the foreshore. The production method of clipfish was developed by the Portuguese who first mined salt near the brackish water of Aveiro, and brought it to Newfoundland where cod was available in massive quantities.. Salting was not economically feasible until the 17th century, when cheap salt from southern Europe became available to the maritime nations of northern Europe.

— Freebase

Hyannis

Hyannis

Hyannis is the largest of the seven villages in the city of Barnstable, Massachusetts. Also it is the commercial and transportation hub of Cape Cod and was designated an urban area as a result of the 1990 census. Because of this, many refer to Hyannis as the "Capital of the Cape". It contains a majority of the Barnstable City offices, and two important shopping districts, the historic downtown Main Street and the Route 132 Commercial District, including Cape Cod Mall and Independence Park, headquarters of Cape Cod Potato Chips. Hyannis is an highly important tourist destination and the primary ferry boat and general aviation link for passengers and freight to Nantucket Island. Hyannis also provides secondary passenger access to the island of Martha's Vineyard, with the primary passenger access to Martha's Vineyard being located in Woods Hole, a village in the nearby town of Falmouth. Due to its large natural harbor, Hyannis is the largest recreational boating and second largest commercial fishing port on Cape Cod, behind only Provincetown. The JFK Hyannis Museum in the old Town Hall on Main St. focuses on John F. Kennedy's time spent in the town. There is a memorial to President Kennedy on the Lewis Bay waterfront that was erected by Barnstable citizens in 1966. The memorial includes a fountain and a field-stone monument with the presidential seal and JFK inscription: "I believe it is important that this country sail and not sit still in the harbor". President-elect John F. Kennedy gave his victory speech on November 9, 1960 at the former Hyannis Armory, which is in the National Register of Historic Places.

— Freebase

So Me

So Me

So Me is a Parisian graphic designer/animator, and music producer. He is the art director for Ed Banger Records, and also releases his tracks upon the label. He has created videos for DJ Mehdi, Kanye West, Kid Cudi, Justice, and MGMT. He won the 2005 MTV European award for his video for Justice called "We Are Your Friends." He is also the main designer for the clothing company CoolCats. 2010 saw Bertrand direct Duck Sauce's music video for "Barbra Streisand", making a cameo in the process. In 2011, de Langeron joined the Los Angeles agency Caviar that also represents directors Alexander Payne, Ruben Fleischer, and Peter Farrelly. In 2011 So Me directed the Embody music video for Ed Banger artist SebastiAn.

— Freebase

Taramasalata

Taramasalata

Taramasalata or taramosalata (Greek: ταραμοσαλάτα, from taramas, from Turkish: tarama 'fish roe' and salata, from Italian: insalata "salad") is a Greek meze made from tarama, the salted and cured roe of the cod, carp, or grey mullet (bottarga) mixed with olive oil, lemon juice, and a starchy base of bread or potatoes, or sometimes almonds. Variants may include garlic, spring onions, or peppers, or vinegar instead of lemon juice. While not traditionally Greek, smoked, rather than cured, cod's roe is more widely available in some places, and often used. Bottarga is usually much more expensive than cod's roe.Traditionally the dish is made with a pestle and mortar, giving a slightly grainy texture, but commercial taramasalata is commonly blended to a very smooth paste.Taramasalata is usually eaten as a meze, a dip for bread or raw vegetables. The colour can vary from creamy beige to pink, depending on the type of roe and colourings used. Most taramasalata sold commercially is dyed pink, but high quality taramasalata is always beige in colour.In Greece, taramasalata is associated with Clean Monday (Καθαρά Δευτέρα, Kathará Deftéra), the first day of Great Lent.

— Wikipedia

saltfish

saltfish

salt cod: Dried and salted cod.

— Wiktionary

skedonk

skedonk

A banger (old, battered motor car)

— Wiktionary

Bacalhau

Bacalhau

Bacalhau is the Portuguese word for cod and—in a culinary context—dried and salted cod. Fresh cod is referred to as bacalhau fresco.

— Freebase

Cod liver oil

Cod liver oil

Cod liver oil is a nutritional supplement derived from liver of cod fish. As with most fish oils, it has high levels of the omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA. Cod liver oil also contains vitamin A and vitamin D. It has historically been taken because of its vitamin A and vitamin D content. It was once commonly given to children, because vitamin D has been shown to prevent rickets and other symptoms of vitamin D deficiency.

— Freebase

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!