Synonyms containing come on to

We've found 4,649 synonyms:

Come

Come

kum, v.i. to move toward this place (the opposite of go): to draw near: to arrive at a certain state or condition: to issue: to happen: (Shak.) to yield; to become: to turn out:—pr.p. com′ing; pa.t. came; pa.p. come.—n. Com′ing.—adj. Come′-at-able, accessible; Come about, to happen; Come across, to meet; Come and go, to have freedom of action (n. passage to and fro); Come at, to reach; Come by, to come near: to pass: to obtain; Come down, to descend: to be reduced (n. a fall); Come down upon, to be severe with; Come down with, to pay down; Come high, or low, to cost much, or little; Come home, to return to one's house: to touch one's interest or feelings closely (with to): (naut.) to drag or slip through the ground—of an anchor; Come in, to enter: to give in, to yield: (fencing) to get within the opponent's guard (Shak.); Come in for, to have reason to expect or to have a share; Come it strong (coll.), to do or say too much; Come of, to descend from: become of; Come off, to come away: to turn out: to escape (n. a conclusion: an evasion of duty); Come out, to result: to be published: to become evident: to enter society; Come out with, to let be known: to tell; Come over (Shak.), surpass: to befall: (slang) to overreach; Come o' will, something that comes of its own accord: an illegitimate child; Come round, to come by a circuitous path: to happen in due course: to change: to recover from a faint; Come short, to fail; Come short of, to fail to accomplish; Come to, to obtain: to amount to: to recover consciousness or sanity; Come to grief, to meet with disaster or ill-fortune; Come to pass, to happen; Come true, to be found to have been true; Come under, to be included under; Come upon, to attack: to affect; to hold answerable: to meet; Come up with, to overtake: reach.—All comers, any one that likes. [A.S. cuman; Ger. kommen, to come.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

come no near!

come no near!

The order to the helmsman to steer the ship on the course indicated, and not closer to the wind, while going "full and by."--Come on board, sir. An officer reporting himself to his superior on returning from duty or leave.--Come to. To bring the ship close to the wind.--Come to an anchor. To let go the anchor.--Come up! with a rope or tackle, is to slack it off.--Comes up, with the helm. A close-hauled ship comes up (to her course) as the wind changes in her favour. To come up with or overhaul a vessel chased.--Come up the capstan. Is to turn it the contrary way to that which it was heaving, so as to take the strain off, or slacken or let out some of the cablet or rope which is about it.--Come up the tackle-fall. Is to let go.--To come up, in ship-building, is to cast loose the forelocks or lashings of a sett, in order to take in closer to the plank.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

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— Editors Contribution

COME FROM

COME FROM

A semi-mythical language construct dual to the ‘go to’; COME FROM <label> would cause the referenced label to act as a sort of trapdoor, so that if the program ever reached it control would quietly and automagically be transferred to the statement following the COME FROM. COME FROM was first proposed in R. Lawrence Clark's A Linguistic Contribution to GOTO-less programming, which appeared in a 1973 Datamation issue (and was reprinted in the April 1984 issue of Communications of the ACM). This parodied the then-raging ‘structured programming’ holy wars (see considered harmful). Mythically, some variants are the assigned COME FROM and the computed COME FROM (parodying some nasty control constructs in FORTRAN and some extended BASICs). Of course, multi-tasking (or non-determinism) could be implemented by having more than one COME FROM statement coming from the same label.In some ways the FORTRAN DO looks like a COME FROM statement. After the terminating statement number/CONTINUE is reached, control continues at the statement following the DO. Some generous FORTRANs would allow arbitrary statements (other than CONTINUE) for the statement, leading to examples like: DO 10 I=1,LIMIT C imagine many lines of code here, leaving the C original DO statement lost in the spaghetti... WRITE(6,10) I,FROB(I) 10 FORMAT(1X,I5,G10.4) in which the trapdoor is just after the statement labeled 10. (This is particularly surprising because the label doesn't appear to have anything to do with the flow of control at all!) While sufficiently astonishing to the unsuspecting reader, this form of COME FROM statement isn't completely general. After all, control will eventually pass to the following statement. The implementation of the general form was left to Univac FORTRAN, ca. 1975 (though a roughly similar feature existed on the IBM 7040 ten years earlier). The statement AT 100 would perform a COME FROM 100. It was intended strictly as a debugging aid, with dire consequences promised to anyone so deranged as to use it in production code. More horrible things had already been perpetrated in production languages, however; doubters need only contemplate the ALTER verb in COBOL. COME FROM was supported under its own name for the first time 15 years later, in C-INTERCAL (see INTERCAL, retrocomputing); knowledgeable observers are still reeling from the shock.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Meet

Meet

to come together by mutual approach; esp., to come in contact, or into proximity, by approach from opposite directions; to join; to come face to face; to come in close relationship; as, we met in the street; two lines meet so as to form an angle

— Webster Dictionary

Future

Future

fūt′ūr, adj. about to be: that is to come: (gram.) expressing what will be.—n. time to come.—n. Fut′ure-per′fect (gram.), a tense expressing action viewed as past in reference to an assumed future time (L. amavero=I shall have loved).—v.i. Fut′urise, to form the future tense.—ns. Fut′urist, one whose chief interests are in what is to come; Futurition (-ish′un), future existence: accomplishment; Futur′ity, time to come: an event or state of being yet to come. [Fr.,—L. futurus, fut.p. of esse, to be.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

succeed

succeed

To come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; -- often with to.

— Wiktionary

rise from the ashes

rise from the ashes

To make a comeback after a long hiatus. To come back into common use or practice. To come back into popularity. To come back to being a thing of today.

— Wiktionary

Arise

Arise

to come up from a lower to a higher position; to come above the horizon; to come up from one's bed or place of repose; to mount; to ascend; to rise; as, to arise from a kneeling posture; a cloud arose; the sun ariseth; he arose early in the morning

— Webster Dictionary

Draw

Draw

to move; to come or go; literally, to draw one's self; -- with prepositions and adverbs; as, to draw away, to move off, esp. in racing, to get in front; to obtain the lead or increase it; to draw back, to retreat; to draw level, to move up even (with another); to come up to or overtake another; to draw off, to retire or retreat; to draw on, to advance; to draw up, to form in array; to draw near, nigh, or towards, to approach; to draw together, to come together, to collect

— Webster Dictionary

Meet

Meet

to join, or come in contact with; esp., to come in contact with by approach from an opposite direction; to come upon or against, front to front, as distinguished from contact by following and overtaking

— Webster Dictionary

Meet

Meet

to come into the presence of without contact; to come close to; to intercept; to come within the perception, influence, or recognition of; as, to meet a train at a junction; to meet carriages or persons in the street; to meet friends at a party; sweet sounds met the ear

— Webster Dictionary

Pass

Pass

to move or to come into being or under notice; to come and go in consciousness; hence, to take place; to occur; to happen; to come; to occur progressively or in succession; to be present transitorily

— Webster Dictionary

Succeed

Succeed

to come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; -- often with to

— Webster Dictionary

Fall

Fall

fawl, v.i. to drop down: to descend by the force of gravity: to become prostrate: (of a river) to discharge itself: to slope down: to sink as if dead: to vanish: to die away: to lose strength, subside: to decline in power, wealth, value, or reputation: to be overthrown: to be compelled to yield: to become downcast: to sink into sin, to yield to temptation: to depart from the faith: to become dejected: to pass gently into any state, as 'to fall in love,' 'to fall asleep:' to befall: to issue, occur: to enter upon with haste or vehemence: to rush: to be dropped in birth: to be required or necessary: to fall away:—pr.p. fall′ing; pa.t. fell; pa.p. fallen (faw′ln).n. the act of falling, in any of its senses: descent by gravity, a dropping down: that which falls—a trap-door, &c.: as much as comes down at one time, as 'a fall of snow,' &c.: overthrow: death: descent from a better to a worse position: slope or declivity: descent of water: a cascade: length of a fall: outlet of a river: decrease in value: a sinking of the voice: the time when the leaves fall, autumn: a bout at wrestling: the yielding of a city or stronghold to the enemy: that which falls: a lapse into sin, esp. that of Adam and Eve, called 'the Fall:' a kind of collar worn in the 17th century.—adj. Fall′en, in a degraded state, ruined.—ns. Fall′ing, that which falls; Fall′ing-band (see Band); Fall′ing-sick′ness, epilepsy; Fall′ing-star, a meteor; Fall′ing-stone, a portion of an exploded meteor; Fall′trank, a medicine compounded of certain aromatic and astringent Swiss plants, of repute for accidents; Fall′-trap, a trap which operates by falling.—Fall-a, to begin; Fall across, to meet by chance; Fall among, to come into the midst of; Fall away, to decline gradually, to languish: to grow lean: to revolt or apostatise; Fall back, to retreat, give way; Fall back, fall edge, no matter what may happen; Fall back upon, to have recourse to some expedient or resource in reserve; Fall behind, to slacken, to be outstripped; Fall flat, to fail completely, as a shopman in attracting attention or purchasers, a new book, &c.; Fall foul, to come in collision: to quarrel (with of); Fall in (with), to concur or agree: to comply: to place themselves in order, as soldiers; Fall off, to separate or be broken: to die away, to perish: to revolt or apostatise; Fall on, to begin eagerly: to make an attack: to meet; Fall on one's feet, to come well out of a difficulty, to gain any unexpected good fortune; Fall out, to quarrel: to happen or befall; Fall over (Shak.), to go over to the enemy; Fall short, to be deficient (with of); Fall through, to fail, come to nothing; Fall to, to begin hastily and eagerly: to apply one's self to; Fall upon, to attack: to attempt: to rush against.—Try a fall, to take a bout at wrestling. [A.S. feallan; Ger. fallen; prob. conn. with L. fallĕre, to deceive.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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