Synonyms containing comparison microscope

We've found 1,162 synonyms:

Microscope

Microscope

mī′krō-skōp, n. an instrument which magnifies to the eye objects so minute as to be almost or quite undiscernible without its aid.—adjs. Microscop′ic, -al, pertaining to a microscope: made by, or as if by, a microscope: visible only by the aid of a microscope: working with, or as if with, a microscope.—adv. Microscop′ically.—ns. Mī′croscopist, one skilled in the use of the microscope; Mī′croscopy.—Binocular microscope, a microscope with two eye-pieces, for viewing an object with both eyes at once; Compound microscope, a microscope with two sets of lenses so arranged that the image formed by the lower or object glass is again magnified by the upper or eye-piece. [Gr. mikros, little, skopein, to look at.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Super-resolution microscopy

Super-resolution microscopy

Super-resolution microscopy, in light microscopy, is a term that gathers several techniques, which allow images to be taken with a higher resolution than the one imposed by the diffraction limit. Due to the diffraction of light, the resolution in conventional light microscopy is limited, as stated (for the special case of widefield illumination) by Ernst Abbe in 1873. In this context, a diffraction-limited microscope with numerical aperture N.A. and light with wavelength λ reaches a lateral resolution of d = λ/(2 N.A.) - a similar formalism can be followed for the axial resolution (along the optical axis, z-resolution, depth resolution). The resolution for a standard optical microscope in the visible light spectrum is about 200 nm laterally and 600 nm axially. Experimentally, the attained resolution can be measured from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function (PSF) using images of point-like objects. Although the resolving power of a microscope is not well defined, it is generally considered that a super-resolution microscopy technique offers a resolution better than the one stipulated by Abbe. Super-resolution imaging techniques rely on the near-field (photon tunneling microscopy as well as those that utilize the Pendry Superlens and near field scanning optical microscopy) or on the far-field. Among the latter are techniques that improve the resolution only modestly (up to about a factor of two) beyond the diffraction-limit like the confocal microscope (with closed pinhole), or confocal microscopy aided with computational methods such as deconvolution or detector-based pixel reassignment (e.g. re-scan microscopy, pixel reassignment ), the 4Pi microscope, and also structured illumination microscopy technologies like SIM and SMI. There are two major groups of methods for super-resolution microscopy in the far-field that can improve the resolution with a much larger factor: Deterministic super-resolution: The most commonly used emitters in biological microscopy, fluorophores, show a nonlinear response to excitation, and this nonlinear response can be exploited to enhance resolution. These methods include STED, GSD, RESOLFT and SSIM. Stochastic super-resolution: The chemical complexity of many molecular light sources gives them a complex temporal behavior, which can be used to make several close-by fluorophores emit light at separate times and thereby become resolvable in time. These methods include Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) and all single-molecule localization methods (SMLM) such as SPDM, SPDMphymod, PALM, FPALM, STORM and dSTORM.On October 8, 2014, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Eric Betzig, W.E. Moerner and Stefan Hell for "the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy," which brings "optical microscopy into the nanodimension".

— Wikipedia

Microscope slide

Microscope slide

A microscope slide is a thin flat piece of glass, typically 75 by 25 mm and about 1 mm thick, used to hold objects for examination under a microscope. Typically the object is placed or secured on the slide, and then both are inserted together in the microscope for viewing. This arrangement allows several slide-mounted objects to be quickly inserted and removed from the microscope, labeled, transported, and stored in appropriate slide cases or folders. Microscope slides are often used together with a cover slip or cover glass, a smaller and thinner sheet of glass that is placed over the specimen. Slides are held in place on the microscope's stage by slide clips, slide clamps or a cross-table which is used to achieve precise, remote movement of the slide upon the microscope's stage

— Freebase

Electron microscope

Electron microscope

An electron microscope is a type of microscope that uses an electron beam to illuminate a specimen and produce a magnified image. An EM has greater resolving power than a light microscope and can reveal the structure of smaller objects because electrons have wavelengths about 100,000 times shorter than visible light photons. They can achieve better than 50 pm resolution and magnifications of up to about 10,000,000x whereas ordinary, non-confocal light microscopes are limited by diffraction to about 200 nm resolution and useful magnifications below 2000x. The electron microscope uses electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses to control the electron beam and focus it to form an image. These electron optical lenses are analogous to the glass lenses of a light optical microscope. Electron microscopes are used to investigate the ultrastructure of a wide range of biological and inorganic specimens including microorganisms, cells, large molecules, biopsy samples, metals, and crystals. Industrially, the electron microscope is often used for quality control and failure analysis. Modern electron microscopes produce electron micrographs, using specialized digital cameras or frame grabbers to capture the image.

— Freebase

Microscope

Microscope

A microscope is an instrument used to see objects that are too small for the naked eye. The science of investigating small objects using such an instrument is called microscopy. Microscopic means invisible to the eye unless aided by a microscope. There are many types of microscopes, the most common and first to be invented is the optical microscope which uses light to image the sample. Other major types of microscopes are the electron microscope and the various types of scanning probe microscope.

— Freebase

Immunofluorescence

Immunofluorescence

Immunofluorescence is a technique used for light microscopy with a fluorescence microscope and is used primarily on microbiological samples. This technique uses the specificity of antibodies to their antigen to target fluorescent dyes to specific biomolecule targets within a cell, and therefore allows visualisation of the distribution of the target molecule through the sample. Immunofluorescence is a widely used example of immunostaining and is a specific example of immunohistochemistry that makes use of fluorophores to visualise the location of the antibodies. Immunofluorescence can be used on tissue sections, cultured cell lines, or individual cells, and may be used to analyse the distribution of proteins, glycans, and small biological and non-biological molecules. Immunofluoresence can be used in combination with other, non-antibody methods of fluorescent staining, for example, use of DAPI to label DNA. Several microscope designs can be used for analysis of immunofluorescence samples; the simplest is the epifluorescence microscope, and the confocal microscope is also widely used. Various super-resolution microscope designs that are capable of much higher resolution can also be used.

— Freebase

Optical microscope

Optical microscope

The optical microscope, often referred to as the "light microscope", is a type of microscope which uses visible light and a system of lenses to magnify images of small samples. Optical microscopes are the oldest design of microscope and were possibly invented in their present compound form in the 17th century. Basic optical microscopes can be very simple, although there are many complex designs which aim to improve resolution and sample contrast. The image from an optical microscope can be captured by normal light-sensitive cameras to generate a micrograph. Originally images were captured by photographic film but modern developments in CMOS and charge-coupled device cameras allow the capture of digital images. Purely digital microscopes are now available which use a CCD camera to examine a sample, showing the resulting image directly on a computer screen without the need for eyepieces. Alternatives to optical microscopy which do not use visible light include scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

— Freebase

microscopically

microscopically

by using a microscope; so as to be visible only with a microscope; as seen with a microscope

— Princeton's WordNet

Compare

Compare

kom-pār′, v.t. to set things together, to ascertain how far they agree or disagree: to liken or represent as similar: (gram.) to inflect an adjective.—v.i. to hold comparison.—n. (obs.) comparison: similitude.—adj. Com′parable, that may be compared.—n. Com′parableness.—adv. Com′parably.—adj. Compar′ative, pertaining to comparison: estimated by comparing with something else: not positive or absolute: (gram.) expressing more.—adv. Compar′atively.—n. Compar′ison, the act of comparing: capacity of being compared: comparative estimate: a simile or figure by which two things are compared: (gram.) the inflection of an adjective.—Beyond compare, without any rival. [Fr.,—L. comparāre, to match, from com, together, parāre, to make or esteem equal—par, equal.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

3Scan

3Scan

Our microscope utilizes a novel serial sectioning technique to create three dimensional models of large volume tissue samples. 3Scan uses the cutting edge technology of the KESM (Knife Edge Scanning Microscope) to automatically section and image samples.Knife-edge scanning, introduced in the KESM instrument, not only preserves image registration throughout the depth of the specimen block but also isolates the tissue above the knife from that below to eliminate undesirable events (back-scattering of light and bleaching of fluorescent-stained tissue below the knife). Knife-edge scanning supports all known forms of microscopy (absorption imaging using transmitted light, and reflected light imaging using bright-field, dark-field, DIC, and GFP fluorescence). Using the KESM, 3Scan is able to scan a one cc^3 block of tissue (for example, a whole mouse brain) at submicron resolution in under 100 hours. With this resolution (a voxel size of 0.6 um x 0.7 um x 1.0 um) 3Scan is able to show cell scale phenomena in the context of a compete organ. In the example of a whole mouse brain this means that 3Scan is able to accurately model every neuron in the mouse brain sample.3Scan currently utilizes this amazingly accurate imaging technology to advance the fields of drug discovery, connectomics, and medical devices, there are many more applications of this exciting technology.While 3Scan is a for profit company we care more about interesting projects than profit margins. If you are working on something that would benefit from 3Scan's unique imaging technique please do not hesitate to contact us about collaborating!

— CrunchBase

Microscopical

Microscopical

of or pertaining to the microscope or to microscopy; made with a microscope; as, microscopic observation

— Webster Dictionary

Microscopy

Microscopy

the use of the microscope; investigation with the microscope

— Webster Dictionary

Stage

Stage

the platform of a microscope, upon which an object is placed to be viewed. See Illust. of Microscope

— Webster Dictionary

slide

slide

A flat, rectangular piece of glass on which a prepared sample may be viewed through a microscope; a microscope slide.

— Wiktionary

microtome

microtome

A special instrument that produces very thin slices of plant and animal tissues, for later examination by light microscope or electron microscope.

— Wiktionary

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