Synonyms containing cutter-brig

We've found 190 synonyms:

Longboat

Longboat

In the days of sailing ships, a vessel would carry several ship's boats for various uses. One would be a longboat, an open boat to be rowed by eight or ten oarsmen, two per thwart. The longboat was double banked; its rowing benches were designed to accommodate two men each pulling an oar on opposite sides. Other boats sometimes embarked on a sailing ship included the cutter, whaleboat, gig, jolly boat, launch, dinghy, and punt. Unlike the dinghy or the cutter, the longboat would have fairly fine lines aft to permit its use in steep waves such as surf or wind against tide where need be. Like other ships' boats, the longboat could be rigged for sailing but was primarily a pulling boat. It had the double-banked arrangement in common with the cutter. This was possible as it had a beam similar to a cutter's but broader than that of a gig, which was single banked. The longboat was generally more seaworthy than the cutter, which had a fuller stern for such load-carrying work as laying out an anchor and cable. In a seaway or surf therefore, the cutter was more prone to broaching. The Oxford English Dictionary notes uses of the word from 1515 to 1867. In later years, particularly in the Royal Navy, the longboat tended to be replaced by the whaler. The cutter was still in use in the 1950s but had been largely replaced by the 32 foot and 25 foot motor cutters.

— Freebase

Cutter

Cutter

Cutter may refer to several types of nautical vessels: ⁕In frequent modern usage, a cutter is a small- or medium-sized vessel whose occupants exercise official authority. Examples are harbor pilots' cutters and cutters of the U.S. Coast Guard or UK Border Agency. ⁕As traditionally used in the context of sailing vessels, a cutter is a small single-masted boat, fore-and-aft rigged, with two or more headsails and often a bowsprit. The cutter's mast may be set farther back than on a sloop. ⁕Cutter also sometimes refers to a small boat serving a larger boat, to ferry passengers or light stores between larger boats and the shore. This type of cutter may be powered by oars, sails or a motor.

— Freebase

Brigand

Brigand

brig′and, n. a robber or freebooter.—ns. Brig′andage, freebooting: plundering; Brig′andine, Brig′antine, a coat-of-mail, composed of linen or leather, with steel rings or plates sewed upon it. [Fr.—It. brigantebriga, strife.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Glass cutter

Glass cutter

A glass cutter is a tool used to make a shallow score in one surface of a piece of glass that is to be broken in two pieces. The scoring makes a split in the surface of the glass which encourages the glass to break along the score. Regular, annealed glass can be broken apart this way but not tempered glass as the latter tends to shatter rather than breaking cleanly into two pieces.A glass cutter may use a diamond to create the split, but more commonly a small cutting wheel made of hardened steel or tungsten carbide 4–6 mm in diameter with a V-shaped profile called a "hone angle" is used. The greater the hone angle of the wheel, the sharper the angle of the V and the thicker the piece of glass it is designed to cut. The hone angle on most hand-held glass cutters is 120°, though wheels are made as sharp as 154° for cutting glass as thick as 0.5 inches (13 mm). Their main drawback is that wheels with sharper hone angles will become dull more quickly than their more obtuse counterparts. The effective cutting of glass also requires a small amount of oil (kerosene is often used) and some glass cutters contain a reservoir of this oil which both lubricates the wheel and prevents it from becoming too hot: as the wheel scores, friction between it and the glass surface briefly generates intense heat, and oil dissipates this efficiently. When properly lubricated a steel wheel can give a long period of satisfactory service. However, tungsten carbide wheels have been proven to have a significantly longer life than steel wheels and offer greater and more reproducible penetration in scoring as well as easier opening of the scored glass. In the Middle Ages, glass was cut with a heated and sharply pointed iron rod. The red hot point was drawn along the moistened surface of the glass causing it to snap apart. Fractures created in this way were not very accurate and the rough pieces had to be chipped or "grozed" down to more exact shapes with a hooked tool called a grozing iron. Between the 14th and 16th centuries, starting in Italy, a diamond-tipped cutter became prevalent which allowed for more precise cutting. Then in 1869 the wheel cutter was developed by Samuel Monce of Bristol, Connecticut, which remains the current standard tool for most glass cutting.Large sheets of glass are usually cut with a computer-assisted CNC semi-automatic glass cutting table. These sheets are then broken out by hand into the individual sheets of glass (also known as "lites" in the glass industry).

— Wikipedia

gun-brig

gun-brig

A small two-masted vessel during the Age of Sail, typically carrying 12 guns, comprising two long guns in the chase position and ten carronades on the broadsides. In the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars this term implied an armed brig smaller than a brig-sloop.

— Wiktionary

Off cutter

Off cutter

An off cutter is a type of delivery in the game of cricket. It is bowled by fast bowlers. A bowler releases a normal fast delivery with the wrist locked in position and the first two fingers positioned on top of the cricket ball, giving it spin about a horizontal axis perpendicular to the length of the pitch. For an off cutter, a right-handed bowler pulls his fingers down the right side of the ball, in an action similar to bowling an off break, only at higher speed. This changes the axis of spin to make it more like an off break, which makes the ball deviate to the right when it bounces on the pitch. From a right-handed batsman's point of view, this deviation is to the left, or from the off side towards the leg side. This deviation is known as cut, and the delivery is called an off cutter because it moves away from the off side. What differentiates a genuine off cutter from a delivery that simply nips back off the seam is that it is deliberately bowled. Off cutters do not turn as sharply as off breaks bowled by an off spin bowler, but at the speed of a fast bowler even a tiny deviation can cause difficulties for the batsman. If he is not quick enough to react to the movement, the batsman can miss the ball with his bat and be bowled between bat and pad or out leg before wicket if struck on the pads.

— Freebase

Leg cutter

Leg cutter

A leg cutter is a type of delivery in the sport of cricket. It is bowled by fast bowlers. A bowler releases a normal fast delivery with the wrist locked in position and the first two fingers positioned on top of the cricket ball, giving it spin about a horizontal axis perpendicular to the length of the pitch. For a leg cutter, a right-handed bowler pulls his fingers down the left side of the ball, rolling the ball out of his hand over the little finger, in an action similar to bowling a leg break, only at higher speed. This changes the axis of spin to make it more like a leg break, which makes the ball deviate to the left when it bounces on the pitch. From a right-handed batsman's point of view, this deviation is to the right, or from the leg side towards the off side. This deviation is known as cut, and the delivery is called a leg cutter because it moves away from the leg side. What differentiates a genuine leg cutter from a seam-up delivery that simply moves away off the seam is that it is deliberately bowled. Leg cutters do not turn as sharply as leg breaks bowled by a leg spin bowler, but at the speed of a fast bowler even a tiny deviation can cause difficulties for the batsman. If he is not quick enough to react to the movement, the batsman can edge the ball off the outside edge of his bat, offering a catch to the wicket-keeper or slips fielders.

— Freebase

Chaff cutter

Chaff cutter

A chaff cutter is a mechanical device for cutting straw or hay into small pieces before being mixed together with other forage and fed to horses and cattle. This aids the animal's digestion and prevents animals from rejecting any part of their food. Chaff and hay played a vital role in most agricultural production as it was used for feeding horses. Horses were extensively used in farming operations until they were replaced by tractors in the 1940s. Chaff cutters have evolved from the basic machines into commercial standard machines that can be driven at various speeds and can achieved various lengths of cuts of chaff with respect to animal preference type. New chaff cutter machines include portable tractor driven chaff cutter - where chaff cutter can be in the field and load trolleys.

— Freebase

Hole saw

Hole saw

A hole saw (also styled holesaw), also known as a hole cutter, is a saw blade of annular (ring) shape, whose annular kerf creates a hole in the workpiece without having to cut up the core material. It is used in a drill. Hole saws typically have a pilot drill bit (arbor) at their center to keep the saw teeth from walking. The fact that a hole saw creates the hole without needing to cut up the core often makes it preferable to twist drills or spade drills for relatively large holes (especially those larger than 25 millimetres (1.0 inch)). The same hole can be made faster and using less power. The depth to which a hole saw can cut is limited by the depth of its cup-like shape. Most hole saws have a fairly short aspect ratio of diameter to depth, and they are used to cut through relatively thin workpieces. However, longer aspect ratios are available for applications that warrant them. Cutting with a hole saw is analogous to some machining operations, called trepanning in the trade, that swing a cutter analogous to a fly cutter in order to achieve a similar result of annular kerf and intact core.

— Wikipedia

brigantine

brigantine

A square-rigged vessel with two masts. A term variously applied by the mariners of different European nations to a peculiar sort of vessel of their own marine. Amongst British seamen this vessel is distinguished by having her main-sail set nearly in the plane of her keel, whereas the main-sails of larger ships are spread athwart the ship's length, and made fast to a yard which hangs parallel to the deck; but in a brig, the foremost side of the main-sail is fastened at different heights to hoops which encircle the main-mast, and slide up and down it as the sail is hoisted or lowered: it is extended by a gaff above and a boom below. Brigantine is a derivative from brig, first applied to passage-boats; in the Celtic meaning "passage over the water." (See HERMAPHRODITE OR BRIG-SCHOONER.)

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Moulder

Moulder

A wood moulder is a machine used to shape wood with profiled cutters. The profiled cutters are also known as knives, and blades. Tooling refers to cutters, knives, blades including planer blades, and cutterheads. Most moulders require the blades to be secured into a cutterhead that mounts on the shaft of the machine. However, some machines such as the Williams & Hussey and the Shop Fox require the blades to bolt directly onto the shaft of the machine. The wood being fed into a moulder is commonly referred to as either “stock” or “blanks”. Wood moulders almost always have the capacity to serve as a wood planer as well. For this reason they are also known as Planer/ Moulders. However, a wood planer does not necessarily have the capability to be a moulder. There are several makes and models of both planers and planer/ moulders on the market. A wood moulder has one or more horizontal cutter heads, and may also have side cutter heads. Because it has horizontal cutter heads a wood moulder differs from a spindle shaper, which has one or sometimes more vertical spindles and no horizontal heads.

— Freebase

Glass cutter

Glass cutter

A glass cutter is a tool used to make a shallow score in one surface of a piece of glass that is to be broken in two pieces. The scoring makes a split in the surface of the glass which encourages the glass to break along the score. Regular, annealed glass can be broken apart this way but not tempered glass, since it shatters rather than breaking cleanly into two pieces. A glass cutter may use a diamond to create the split or more commonly a small cutting wheel is used made of hardened steel or tungsten carbide 4-6 mm in diameter, with its cutting edge ground to a V-shaped profile. Some glass cutters hold a small amount of cutting oil, which both lubricates the wheel and prevents the split in the glass from closing. When properly lubricated a steel wheel can give a long period of satisfactory service. However, tungsten carbide wheels have a significantly longer life than steel wheels and offer other advantages in use, such as greater and more reproducible penetration in cutting and consequently easier parting of the glass. In the Middle Ages glass was cut with a tool which was nothing more than a sharply pointed rod of iron, heated to a high temperature. The red hot point was drawn along the moistened surface of the glass causing it to snap apart. The fracture was not very accurate and the rough piece had to be chipped or grozed down to the exact shape with the help of a hooked tool called a grozing iron. The present day Steel Wheel Cutter, which is almost universally used, was invented in 1869 by Samuel Monce in Bristol. Connecticut.

— Freebase

Bolt cutter

Bolt cutter

A bolt cutter, sometimes called bolt cropper, is a tool used for cutting chains, padlocks, bolts and wire mesh. The original use for bolt cutters was as the name suggests to cut bolt seals from shipping containers at the delivery point. It typically has long handles and short blades, with compound hinges to maximize leverage and cutting force. A typical bolt cutter yields 20 kilonewtons of cutting force for a 250 newtons force on the handles. There are different types of cutting blades for bolt cutters, including angle cut, center cut, shear cut, and clipper cut blades. Bolt cutters are available usually in 12, 14, 18, 24, 30, 36 and 42 inches in length. The length is measured from the tip of the jaw to the end of the handle. ⁕Angle cut has the cutter head angled for easier insertion. Typical angling is 25 to 35 degrees. ⁕Center cut has the blades equidistant from the two faces of the blade. ⁕Shear cut has the blades inverted to each other. ⁕Clipper cut has the blades flush against one face. Bolt cutters with fiberglass handles can be used for cutting live electrical wires and are useful during rescue operations. The fiberglass handles have another advantage of being lighter in weight than the conventional drop forged or solid pipe handles.

— Freebase

Hole saw

Hole saw

A hole saw, also known as a hole cutter, is a saw blade of annular shape, whose annular kerf creates a hole in the workpiece without having to cut up the core material. It is used in a drill. Hole saws typically have a pilot drill bit at their center to keep the saw teeth from walking. The fact that a hole saw creates the hole without needing to cut up the core often makes it preferable to twist drills or spade drills for relatively large holes. The same hole can be made faster and using less power. The depth to which a hole saw can cut is limited by the depth of its cup-like shape. Most hole saws have a fairly short aspect ratio of diameter to depth, and they are used to cut through relatively thin workpieces. However, longer aspect ratios are available for applications that warrant them. Cutting with a hole saw is analogous to some machining operations, called trepanning in the trade, that swing a cutter analogous to a fly cutter in order to achieve a similar result of annular kerf and intact core.

— Freebase

Cutter

Cutter

one who cuts; as, a stone cutter; a die cutter; esp., one who cuts out garments

— Webster Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "grievous"?
  • A. afflictive
  • B. deplorable
  • C. trifling
  • D. baleful