Synonyms containing cutter-stay fashion

We've found 3,384 synonyms:

Longboat

Longboat

In the days of sailing ships, a vessel would carry several ship's boats for various uses. One would be a longboat, an open boat to be rowed by eight or ten oarsmen, two per thwart. The longboat was double banked; its rowing benches were designed to accommodate two men each pulling an oar on opposite sides. Other boats sometimes embarked on a sailing ship included the cutter, whaleboat, gig, jolly boat, launch, dinghy, and punt. Unlike the dinghy or the cutter, the longboat would have fairly fine lines aft to permit its use in steep waves such as surf or wind against tide where need be. Like other ships' boats, the longboat could be rigged for sailing but was primarily a pulling boat. It had the double-banked arrangement in common with the cutter. This was possible as it had a beam similar to a cutter's but broader than that of a gig, which was single banked. The longboat was generally more seaworthy than the cutter, which had a fuller stern for such load-carrying work as laying out an anchor and cable. In a seaway or surf therefore, the cutter was more prone to broaching. The Oxford English Dictionary notes uses of the word from 1515 to 1867. In later years, particularly in the Royal Navy, the longboat tended to be replaced by the whaler. The cutter was still in use in the 1950s but had been largely replaced by the 32 foot and 25 foot motor cutters.

— Freebase

stay

stay

A large strong rope extending from the upper end of each mast towards the stem of the ship, as the shrouds are extended on each side. The object of both is to prevent the masts from springing, when the ship is pitching deep. Thus stays are fore and aft; those which are led down to the vessel's side are backstays.--The fore-stay is that which reaches from the foremast-head towards the bowsprit end.--The main-stay is that which extends to the ship's stem.--The mizen-stay is that which is stretched to a collar on the main-mast, immediately above the quarter-deck.--The fore-topmast stay is that which comes to the end of the bowsprit, a little beyond the fore-stay, on which the fore-topmast staysail runs on hanks.--The main-topmast stay is attached to the hounds of the fore-mast, or comes on deck.--The mizen-topmast stay is that which comes to the hounds of the main-mast. The top-gallant, royal, or any other masts, have each a stay, named after their respective masts.--Spring-stay is a kind of substitute nearly parallel to the principal stay, and intended to help the principal stay to support its mast.--Stay of a steamer. An iron bar between the two knees which secure the paddle-beams. (See FUNNEL-STAYS.)--To stay. To tack, to bring the ship's head up to the wind for going about; hence to miss stays, is to fail in the attempt to go about.--In stays, or hove in stays, is the situation of a vessel when she is staying, or in the act of going about; a vessel in bad trim, or lubberly handled, is sure to be slack in stays, and refuses stays, when she has to wear.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Rochas

Rochas

Rochas is a fashion, beauty, and perfume house founded in 1925 by French designer Marcel Rochas (born 1902, died 1955) the first designer of 2/3-length coats and skirts with pockets. Rochas had been known primarily for its signature perfume, "Femme," which was packaged in a pink box with black lace.The company found recent recognition for its fashion design when it chose Olivier Theyskens as its creative director in 2002. (In the years leading to his appointment, its clothes had not been considered notable.) Theyskens, within his first few months, created an "entirely new silhouette for the house" that was French-influenced and elegant. His first full collection, for Fall 2003, was praised by style.com as "ravishing" and "nothing short of magnificent."For the next several years, Rochas continued to garner praise among fashion critics and to attract loyal followers. Rochas' clients included Nicole Kidman, Jennifer Aniston, Kirsten Dunst, Kate Bosworth, Jennifer Lopez, Rachel Weisz, and Sarah Jessica Parker. In 2006, the Council of Fashion Designers of America awarded Theyskens the International Award. However, Theyskens' focus on "demicouture" (special pieces too costly to mass-produce but which may not meet strict couture rules regarding hand-stitching and numbers of fitting) was questioned by fashion insiders as a viable business strategy. His gowns, some of which were priced upwards of $20,000, were often out of reach for all but the most fabulously wealthy. Theyskens took a purer approach to fashion and did not rely (like many fashion houses) on accessory sales and cheaper sister lines for a steady stream of revenue.In July 2006, Procter & Gamble announced the discontinuation of Rochas' fashion division, shocking many in the fashion industry. One "longtime designer," commenting anonymously in the New York Times, said of the closure, "That sort of perfect, made-to-measure business can't exist today, which is really too bad. Everything is about business now, and fashion shouldn't have to follow normal economic models—that's not the point. What happened to investing in beauty?"News emerged in 2008 that there were plans to reopen the fashion house.On November 3, 2008, Marco Zanini was named new artistic director for the fashion house. He showed his first collection during Paris Fashion Week in February 2009. About half a century separate Marco Zanini from the creator and founder of the house, Marcel Rochas. Born in 1971, Marco Zanini graduated from the Fine Arts Academy of Milan in 1995. After having been Assistant at Dolce & Gabbana for their ready-to-wear line, he became Donatella Versace's right arm. He then relaunched the American brand of Halston. Rochas conferred the responsibility of its ready-to-wear collections upon him in 2009. His ambition to build "brick by brick" and season after season the foundations of a renewed House of Rochas, his insistence on making each new collection "unpredictable", confirm the renaissance of Rochas in fashion. In September 2013, it was confirmed that Zanini would be leaving Rochas after five years with the brand to take on the role of Creative Director at the House of Schiaparelli. He would be replaced by Alessandro Dell'Acqua who currently also designs his own line No. 21. Dell'Acqua's first show for Rochas is set to take place in February 2014.In 2017 Rochas has made their first foray into menswear. In January the formerly only women's wear oriented label unveiled their first menswear collection, created by French designer Béatrice Ferran.

— Wikipedia

Fashion journalism

Fashion journalism

Fashion journalism involves all aspects of published fashion media, including fashion writers, fashion critics, and fashion reporters. This can be fashion features in magazines and newspapers, and may also include books about fashion, fashion related reports on television and online fashion magazines, websites, and blogs. The work of a fashion journalist can be quite varied. Typical work includes writing or editing articles, or helping to formulate and style a fashion shoot. A fashion journalist typically spends a lot of time researching and conducting interviews and it is essential that he or she has good contacts with people in the fashion industry, including photographers, designers, and public relations specialists. Fashion journalists are either employed full-time by a publication or are employed on a freelance basis.

— Wikipedia

Cutter

Cutter

Cutter may refer to several types of nautical vessels: ⁕In frequent modern usage, a cutter is a small- or medium-sized vessel whose occupants exercise official authority. Examples are harbor pilots' cutters and cutters of the U.S. Coast Guard or UK Border Agency. ⁕As traditionally used in the context of sailing vessels, a cutter is a small single-masted boat, fore-and-aft rigged, with two or more headsails and often a bowsprit. The cutter's mast may be set farther back than on a sloop. ⁕Cutter also sometimes refers to a small boat serving a larger boat, to ferry passengers or light stores between larger boats and the shore. This type of cutter may be powered by oars, sails or a motor.

— Freebase

Stay

Stay

stā, v.i. to remain: to abide for any time: to continue in a state: to wait: to cease acting: to dwell: to trust.—v.t. to cause to stand: to stop: to restrain: to delay: to prevent from falling: to prop: to support, rest, rely:—pa.t. and pa.p. stayed, staid.—n. continuance in a place: abode for a time: stand: stop: a fixed state: a standstill: suspension of a legal proceeding: prop, support: (pl.) a kind of stiff inner waistcoat worn by women.—ns. Stay′-at-home, one who keeps much at home—also adj.; Stay′-bolt, a bolt or rod binding together opposite plates; Stay′er, one who, or that which, stops, holds, or supports: a person or animal of good lasting or staying qualities for a race, &c.; Stay′-lace, a lace for fastening a bodice; Stay′-mā′ker, one whose occupation is to make stays.—Stay the stomach, to allay the cravings of hunger for the time. [O. Fr. estayer, estaye—Old Dut. stade, a stay.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sustainable fashion

Sustainable fashion

Sustainable fashion is a movement and process of fostering change to fashion products and the fashion system towards greater ecological integrity and social justice. Sustainable fashion concerns more than addressing fashion textiles or products. It comprises addressing the whole system of fashion. This means dealing with interdependent social, cultural, ecological and financial systems. It also means considering fashion from the perspective of many stakeholders - users and producers, all living species, contemporary and future dwellers on earth. Sustainable fashion therefore belongs to, and is the responsibility of citizens, public sector and private sector. A key example of the need for systems thinking in fashion is that the benefits of product-level initiatives, such as replacing one fiber type for a less environmentally harmful option is eaten up by increasing volumes of fashion products. An adjacent term to sustainable fashion is eco fashion.

— Wikipedia

Fashion

Fashion

fash′un, n. the make or cut of a thing: form or pattern: prevailing mode or shape of dress: a prevailing custom: manner: genteel society: appearance.—v.t. to make: to mould according to a pattern: to suit or adapt.—adj. Fash′ionable, made according to prevailing fashion: prevailing or in use at any period: observant of the fashion in dress or living: moving in high society: patronised by people of fashion.—n. a person of fashion.—n. Fash′ionableness.—adv. Fash′ionably.—ns. Fash′ioner; Fash′ionist.—adjs. Fash′ionmongering, Fash′ionmonging (Shak.), behaving like a fop.—After, or In, a fashion, in a way: to a certain extent; In the fashion, in accordance with the prevailing style of dress, &c.—opp. to Out of fashion. [O. Fr. fachon—L. faction-emfacĕre, to make.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Glass cutter

Glass cutter

A glass cutter is a tool used to make a shallow score in one surface of a piece of glass that is to be broken in two pieces. The scoring makes a split in the surface of the glass which encourages the glass to break along the score. Regular, annealed glass can be broken apart this way but not tempered glass as the latter tends to shatter rather than breaking cleanly into two pieces.A glass cutter may use a diamond to create the split, but more commonly a small cutting wheel made of hardened steel or tungsten carbide 4–6 mm in diameter with a V-shaped profile called a "hone angle" is used. The greater the hone angle of the wheel, the sharper the angle of the V and the thicker the piece of glass it is designed to cut. The hone angle on most hand-held glass cutters is 120°, though wheels are made as sharp as 154° for cutting glass as thick as 0.5 inches (13 mm). Their main drawback is that wheels with sharper hone angles will become dull more quickly than their more obtuse counterparts. The effective cutting of glass also requires a small amount of oil (kerosene is often used) and some glass cutters contain a reservoir of this oil which both lubricates the wheel and prevents it from becoming too hot: as the wheel scores, friction between it and the glass surface briefly generates intense heat, and oil dissipates this efficiently. When properly lubricated a steel wheel can give a long period of satisfactory service. However, tungsten carbide wheels have been proven to have a significantly longer life than steel wheels and offer greater and more reproducible penetration in scoring as well as easier opening of the scored glass. In the Middle Ages, glass was cut with a heated and sharply pointed iron rod. The red hot point was drawn along the moistened surface of the glass causing it to snap apart. Fractures created in this way were not very accurate and the rough pieces had to be chipped or "grozed" down to more exact shapes with a hooked tool called a grozing iron. Between the 14th and 16th centuries, starting in Italy, a diamond-tipped cutter became prevalent which allowed for more precise cutting. Then in 1869 the wheel cutter was developed by Samuel Monce of Bristol, Connecticut, which remains the current standard tool for most glass cutting.Large sheets of glass are usually cut with a computer-assisted CNC semi-automatic glass cutting table. These sheets are then broken out by hand into the individual sheets of glass (also known as "lites" in the glass industry).

— Wikipedia

Fast fashion

Fast fashion

Fast fashion is a contemporary term used by fashion retailers to express that designs move from catwalk quickly in order to capture current fashion trends. Fast fashion clothing collections are based on the most recent fashion trends presented at Fashion Week in both the spring and the autumn of every year. These trends are designed and manufactured quickly and cheaply to allow the mainstream consumer to take advantage of current clothing styles at a lower price. This philosophy of quick manufacturing at an affordable price is used in large retailers such as H&M, Zara, Peacocks, and Topshop. It particularly came to the fore during the vogue for "boho chic" in the mid-2000s. This has developed from a product-driven concept based on a manufacturing model referred to as "quick response" developed in the U.S. in the 1980s and moved to a market-based model of "fast fashion" in the late 1990s and first part of the 21st century. Zara has been at the forefront of this fashion retail revolution and their brand has almost become synonymous with the term, but there were other retailers who worked with the concept before the label was applied, such as Benetton. Fast fashion has also become associated with disposable fashion because it has delivered designer product to a mass market at relatively low prices.

— Freebase

Fashion show

Fashion show

A fashion show is an event put on by a fashion designer to showcase his or her upcoming line of clothing during Fashion Week. Fashion shows debut every season, particularly the Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter seasons. This is where the latest fashion trends are made. The two most influential fashion weeks are Paris Fashion Week and New York Fashion Week, which are both semiannual events. In a typical fashion show, models walk the catwalk dressed in the clothing created by the designer. Occasionally, fashion shows take the form of installations, where the models are static, standing or sitting in a constructed environment. The order in which each model walks out wearing a specific outfit is usually planned in accordance to the statement that the designer wants to make about his or her collection. It is then up to the audience to not only try to understand what the designer is trying to say by the way the collection is being presented, but to also visually deconstruct each outfit and try to appreciate the detail and craftsmanship of every single piece. A wide range of contemporary designers tend to produce their shows as theatrical productions with elaborate sets and added elements such as live music or a variety of technological components like holograms, for example.

— Freebase

Stay

Stay

stā, n. a large strong rope running from the head of one mast to another mast ('fore-and-aft' stay), or to the side of the ship ('back'-stay): the transverse piece in a chain-cable link.—v.t. to support or to incline to one side by means of stays: to put on the other tack, to cause to go about.—v.i. to change tack, to go about, to be in stays.—ns. Stay′sail, a sail extended on a stay; Stay′-tack′le, a large hoisting tackle fixed by a pendant to the mainstay of a ship.—Miss stays (see Miss). [A.S. stæg; Dut. stag, Ger. stag.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cut

Cut

kut, v.t. to make an incision in: to cleave or pass through: to divide: to carve, hew, or fashion by cutting: to wound or hurt: to affect deeply: to shorten: to break off acquaintance with, to pass intentionally without saluting: to renounce, give up: to castrate: to perform or execute, as 'to cut a caper.'—v.i. to make an incision: to pass, go quickly: (slang) to run away, to be off: to twiddle the feet rapidly in dancing:—pr.p. cut′ting; pa.t. and pa.p. cut.—n. a cleaving or dividing: a stroke or blow: an act of unkindness: the card obtained by cutting or dividing the pack: an incision or wound: a piece cut off: an engraved block, or the picture from it: manner of cutting, or, fashion: (pl.) a lot.—n. Cut′away′, a coat with the skirt cut away in a curve in front—also adj.ns. Cut′-off, that which cuts off or shortens, a straighter road, a shorter channel cut by a river across a bend: a contrivance for saving steam by regulating its admission to the cylinder; Cut′purse (Shak.), one who stole by Cutter. cutting off and carrying away purses (the purses being worn at the girdle): a pickpocket; Cut′ter, the person or thing that cuts: in a tailor's shop, the one who measures and cuts out the cloth: a small vessel with one mast, a mainsail, a forestaysail, and a jib set to bowsprit-end, any sloop of narrow beam and deep draught; Cut′-throat, an assassin: ruffian; Cut′ting, a dividing or lopping off: an incision: a piece cut off: a paragraph from a newspaper: a piece of road or railway excavated: a twig; Cut′-wa′ter, the fore-part of a ship's prow.—Cut a dash, or figure, to make a conspicuous appearance; Cut-and-come-again, abundant supply, from the notion of cutting a slice, and returning at will for another; Cut-and-cover, a method of forming a tunnel by cutting out, arching it over, and then covering in; Cut-and-dry, or Cut-and-dried, ready made, without the merit of freshness—from the state of herbs in the shop instead of the field; Cut and run, to be off quickly; Cut down, to take down the body of one hanged by cutting the rope: to reduce, curtail; Cut in, to strike into, as to a conversation, a game at whist; Cut it too fat, to overdo a thing; Cut off, to destroy, put to an untimely death: intercept: stop; Cut off with a shilling, to disinherit, bequeathing only a shilling; Cut one's stick, to take one's departure; Cut out, to shape: contrive: debar: supplant: to take a ship out of a harbour, &c., by getting between her and the shore; Cut short, to abridge: check; Cut the coat according to the cloth, to adapt one's self to circumstances; Cut the teeth, to have the teeth grow through the gums—of an infant; Cut the throat of (fig.), to destroy utterly; Cut up, to carve: eradicate: criticise severely: turn out (well or ill) when divided into parts; Cut up rough, to become quarrelsome.—A cut above (coll.), a degree or stage above; Short cut, or Near cut, a short way. [Prob. W. cwtau, shorten.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

French fashion

French fashion

Fashion in France is an important aspect in the spectrum of culture and social life, as well as being an important aspect of the economy.Fashion design and production is from prominence in France from the 15th century. From the 17th century, it exploded into a rich industry both for local consumption and for export. The Royal Minister of Finances, Jean-Baptiste Colbert, expressed it as "Fashion is to France what the gold mines of Peru are to Spain...". During the 19th century, fashion transitioned into many styles. The modern term of haute couture originated in the 1860s, for fashion in good taste. The term prêt-à-porter was born in the 1960s, reacting against the traditional notions of fashion and garment-making process, satisfying the needs of pop culture and mass media. Paris acts as the center of the fashion industry and holds the name of global fashion capital. The city is home to many prime designers, including Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Givenchy, Balmain, Louboutin, Pierre Cardin, Yves Saint Laurent, Roger Vivier, Thierry Mugler, Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Hermès, Lanvin, Chloé, Rochas, and Céline.With the decentralization of the fashion industry, many cities including: Lyon, Marseille, Bordeaux, Toulouse, Lille and Strasbourg have their own luxury districts and avenues. In recent times, these have become important customers and significant producers. Île-de-France, Manosque, La Gacilly (near Rennes), and Vichy lead the cosmetic industry, and house well-known international beauty houses such as L'Oreal, Lancôme, Guerlain, Clarins, Yves Rocher, L'Occitane, Vichy, etc. The cities of Nice, Cannes and St. Tropez among others in the French riviera are well known as places of pleasure, annually hosting many media celebrities and personalities, potentates, and billionaires.

— Wikipedia

Street style

Street style

Street fashion is fashion that is considered to have emerged not from studios, but from the grassroots streetwear. Street fashion is generally associated with youth culture, and is most often seen in major urban centers. Magazines and Newspapers like the New York Times and Elle commonly feature candid photographs of individuals wearing urban, stylish clothing. Japanese street fashion sustains multiple simultaneous highly diverse fashion movements at any given time. Mainstream fashion often appropriates street fashion trends as influences. Nowadays, street fashion is getting more and more popular. Most major youth subcultures have had an associated street fashion.

— Wikipedia

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