Synonyms containing cutter-stay fashion Page #3

We've found 3,417 synonyms:

Moulder

Moulder

A wood moulder is a machine used to shape wood with profiled cutters. The profiled cutters are also known as knives, and blades. Tooling refers to cutters, knives, blades including planer blades, and cutterheads. Most moulders require the blades to be secured into a cutterhead that mounts on the shaft of the machine. However, some machines such as the Williams & Hussey and the Shop Fox require the blades to bolt directly onto the shaft of the machine. The wood being fed into a moulder is commonly referred to as either “stock” or “blanks”. Wood moulders almost always have the capacity to serve as a wood planer as well. For this reason they are also known as Planer/ Moulders. However, a wood planer does not necessarily have the capability to be a moulder. There are several makes and models of both planers and planer/ moulders on the market. A wood moulder has one or more horizontal cutter heads, and may also have side cutter heads. Because it has horizontal cutter heads a wood moulder differs from a spindle shaper, which has one or sometimes more vertical spindles and no horizontal heads.

— Freebase

Glass cutter

Glass cutter

A glass cutter is a tool used to make a shallow score in one surface of a piece of glass that is to be broken in two pieces. The scoring makes a split in the surface of the glass which encourages the glass to break along the score. Regular, annealed glass can be broken apart this way but not tempered glass, since it shatters rather than breaking cleanly into two pieces. A glass cutter may use a diamond to create the split or more commonly a small cutting wheel is used made of hardened steel or tungsten carbide 4-6 mm in diameter, with its cutting edge ground to a V-shaped profile. Some glass cutters hold a small amount of cutting oil, which both lubricates the wheel and prevents the split in the glass from closing. When properly lubricated a steel wheel can give a long period of satisfactory service. However, tungsten carbide wheels have a significantly longer life than steel wheels and offer other advantages in use, such as greater and more reproducible penetration in cutting and consequently easier parting of the glass. In the Middle Ages glass was cut with a tool which was nothing more than a sharply pointed rod of iron, heated to a high temperature. The red hot point was drawn along the moistened surface of the glass causing it to snap apart. The fracture was not very accurate and the rough piece had to be chipped or grozed down to the exact shape with the help of a hooked tool called a grozing iron. The present day Steel Wheel Cutter, which is almost universally used, was invented in 1869 by Samuel Monce in Bristol. Connecticut.

— Freebase

Bolt cutter

Bolt cutter

A bolt cutter, sometimes called bolt cropper, is a tool used for cutting chains, padlocks, bolts and wire mesh. The original use for bolt cutters was as the name suggests to cut bolt seals from shipping containers at the delivery point. It typically has long handles and short blades, with compound hinges to maximize leverage and cutting force. A typical bolt cutter yields 20 kilonewtons of cutting force for a 250 newtons force on the handles. There are different types of cutting blades for bolt cutters, including angle cut, center cut, shear cut, and clipper cut blades. Bolt cutters are available usually in 12, 14, 18, 24, 30, 36 and 42 inches in length. The length is measured from the tip of the jaw to the end of the handle. ⁕Angle cut has the cutter head angled for easier insertion. Typical angling is 25 to 35 degrees. ⁕Center cut has the blades equidistant from the two faces of the blade. ⁕Shear cut has the blades inverted to each other. ⁕Clipper cut has the blades flush against one face. Bolt cutters with fiberglass handles can be used for cutting live electrical wires and are useful during rescue operations. The fiberglass handles have another advantage of being lighter in weight than the conventional drop forged or solid pipe handles.

— Freebase

Hole saw

Hole saw

A hole saw, also known as a hole cutter, is a saw blade of annular shape, whose annular kerf creates a hole in the workpiece without having to cut up the core material. It is used in a drill. Hole saws typically have a pilot drill bit at their center to keep the saw teeth from walking. The fact that a hole saw creates the hole without needing to cut up the core often makes it preferable to twist drills or spade drills for relatively large holes. The same hole can be made faster and using less power. The depth to which a hole saw can cut is limited by the depth of its cup-like shape. Most hole saws have a fairly short aspect ratio of diameter to depth, and they are used to cut through relatively thin workpieces. However, longer aspect ratios are available for applications that warrant them. Cutting with a hole saw is analogous to some machining operations, called trepanning in the trade, that swing a cutter analogous to a fly cutter in order to achieve a similar result of annular kerf and intact core.

— Freebase

Length of stay

Length of stay

Length of stay is a term commonly used to measure the duration of a single episode of hospitalization. Inpatient days are calculated by subtracting day of admission from day of discharge. However, persons entering and leaving a hospital on the same day have a length of stay of one. A popular statistic associated with length of stay is the average length of stay, calculated by dividing the sum of inpatient days by the number of patients admissions with the same DRG classification. A variation in the calculation of ALOS could be consider only length of stay during the period under analysis. The prospective payment system in U.S. Medicare for reimbursing hospital care promotes shorter LOS by paying the same amount for procedures, regardless of days spent in the hospital.

— Freebase

Cutter

Cutter

one who cuts; as, a stone cutter; a die cutter; esp., one who cuts out garments

— Webster Dictionary

Sloop

Sloop

a vessel having one mast and fore-and-aft rig, consisting of a boom-and-gaff mainsail, jibs, staysail, and gaff topsail. The typical sloop has a fixed bowsprit, topmast, and standing rigging, while those of a cutter are capable of being readily shifted. The sloop usually carries a centerboard, and depends for stability upon breadth of beam rather than depth of keel. The two types have rapidly approximated since 1880. One radical distinction is that a slop may carry a centerboard. See Cutter, and Illustration in Appendix

— Webster Dictionary

Pauline Trigère

Pauline Trigère

Pauline Trigère was a French-born American fashion designer, known for her crisp, tailored cuts and innovative ideas. The daughter of a tailor, Trigère was able to operate a sewing machine by age 10 and often assisted her dressmaker mother. Shortly after leaving school, Pauline was employed as a trainee cutter at Martial et Armand in the Place Vendôme, Paris. While there, she met American designer Adele Simpson, who told her about the wonders of the New York fashion world. In 1937, aged 25, she moved to New York where she first found work at Ben Gerschel and later became assistant designer at Hattie Carnegie. In 1942, Trigère decided to open her own fashion house, which was managed by her brother Robert Trigère. Her first small collection of 12 dresses was taken to department store buyers all across the country and by 1945, Trigère was a respected New York label. She received her first Coty Award in 1952. In the 1950s she started to produce costume jewelry to accompany her outfits, as did many other fashion houses at the time. Her clientele included many famous women such as the Duchess of Windsor, actress Claudette Colbert and singer Lena Horne. Trigère is also cited for designing Patricia Neal's sophisticated wardrobe in Breakfast at Tiffany's, although other sources credit Edith Head with Neal's wardrobe in the film.

— Freebase

Mary Quant

Mary Quant

Dame Barbara Mary Quant, Mrs Plunket Greene, DBE, FCSD, RDI (born 11 February 1934) is an English fashion designer and fashion icon, who is of Welsh heritageShe became an instrumental figure in the 1960s London-based Mod and youth fashion movements. She was one of the designers who took credit for the miniskirt and hotpants, and by promoting these and other fun fashions she encouraged young people to dress to please themselves and to treat fashion as a game. Ernestine Carter, an authoritative and influential fashion journalist of the 1950s and 1960s, wrote: "It is given to a fortunate few to be born at the right time, in the right place, with the right talents. In recent fashion there are three: Chanel, Dior, and Mary Quant."

— Wikipedia

Anna Wintour

Anna Wintour

Dame Anna Wintour (; born 3 November 1949) is a British-American journalist and editor who has been editor-in-chief of Vogue since 1988 and artistic director for Condé Nast, Vogue's publisher, since 2013. With her trademark pageboy bob haircut and dark sunglasses, Wintour has become an important figure in much of the fashion world, widely praised for her eye for fashion trends and her support for younger designers. Her reportedly aloof and demanding personality has earned her the nickname "Nuclear Wintour". Her father, Charles Wintour, editor of the London Evening Standard (1959–76), consulted her on how to make the newspaper relevant to the youth of the era. She became interested in fashion as a teenager. Her career in fashion journalism began at two British magazines. Later, she moved to the US, with stints at New York and House & Garden. She returned to London and was the editor of British Vogue between 1985 and 1987. A year later, she assumed control of the franchise's magazine in New York, reviving what many saw as a stagnating publication. Her use of the magazine to shape the fashion industry has been the subject of debate within it. Animal rights activists have attacked her for promoting fur, while other critics have charged her with using the magazine to promote elitist views of femininity and beauty. A former personal assistant, Lauren Weisberger, wrote the 2003 bestselling roman à clef The Devil Wears Prada, later made into a successful film starring Meryl Streep as Miranda Priestly, a fashion editor, believed to be based on Wintour. In 2009, she was the focus of another film, R. J. Cutler's documentary The September Issue.

— Wikipedia

Fashion

Fashion

Fashion is a general term for a popular style or practice, especially in clothing, footwear, accessories, makeup, body piercing, or furniture. Fashion refers to a distinctive and often habitual trend in the style with which a person dresses, as well as to prevailing styles in behaviour. Fashion also refers to the newest creations of textile designers. The more technical term, costume, has become so linked to the term "fashion" that the use of the former has been relegated to special senses like fancy dress or masquerade wear, while "fashion" means clothing more generally and the study of it. Although aspects of fashion can be feminine or masculine, some trends are androgynous.

— Freebase

Aristocrat

Aristocrat

Aristocrat is a Japanese street fashion that is inspired by what is thought to have been worn by Middle Class and higher social status Europeans in the Middle Ages, as well as the upper class in the 19th century. The fashion includes long sleeve blouses and shirts, long skirts, corsetry, and pants and dresses that are styled similarly for men and women, since it is centered on androgyny and elegance. Makeup, when worn with the fashion, is on the darker side, may be heavy, and can be worn by both genders. Madam, the feminine version, is more influenced by 19th century fashion. The fashion includes, in addition to the above, dresses with feminine but not usually frilly styling in a variety of colors. Makeup, when worn, is usually mature and on the slightly heavier side, though not excessive. Subcategories of the fashion include: ⁕Erotic Aristocrat: A more revealing version including lace and lower necklines ⁕Gothic Aristocrat ⁕Sweet Aristocrat: Usually features pastels, light colors and a lighter feel

— Freebase

Fashion Model

Fashion Model

The first person described as a fashion model is Parisian shopgirl, Marie Vernet Worth. She was a house model in 1852, to her fashion designer husband, Charles Frederick Worth.[3][4] Even after fashion photography became important, fashion models generally remained fairly anonymous and relatively poorly paid until the late 1950s, though often marrying well. The first model widely considered to have paved the way for what would become the supermodel was Lisa Fonssagrives, from the 1930s onwards, in America.[5] The relationship between her image on over 200 Vogue covers and her name recognition led to the importance of Vogue in shaping future supermodels. Her image appeared on the cover of fashion magazines during the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s from Town & Country, Life and Vogue to the original Vanity Fair. Dorian Leigh was also very well-known after Word War II. The rise of model as consistent media personalities perhaps began in the Swinging Sixties with figures like Jean Shrimpton, Twiggy, and Penelope Tree, and has continued ever since. To model clothing for all people, all types of model shapes and sizes are required. The job ranking for modern fashion models are: print (part time), print modelling (full time), runway modelling, and supermodel.

— Freebase

Kate Moss

Kate Moss

Katherine Ann "Kate" Moss is an English model. Moss was born in Croydon, Greater London, Moss was later discovered in 1988 at the age of 14 by Sarah Doukas, the founder of Storm Model Management, at JFK Airport in New York City. Moss rose to fame in the early 1990s as part of the heroin chic fashion trend. She is known for her waifish figure, and role in size zero fashion. Moss would later go on to have campaigns for a variety of designers including Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, Calvin Klein, Chanel and Rimmel. Kate Moss will receive a Special Recognition award in December at the 2013 British Fashion Awards to acknowledge her contribution to the fashion industry during her 25-year career. Aside from modelling, Moss has embarked on numerous ventures, both fashion related and non-fashion related, which include her own clothing line and involvement in musical projects. Moss has won numerous accolades for her modelling career, in 2007, TIME magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Moss has also been used as inspiration in a large amount of cultural depictions including a £1.5m 18 carat gold statue was made of Moss in 2008 as part of a British Museum exhibition. The statue is said to be the largest gold statue to be created since the era of Ancient Egypt.

— Freebase

Forestay

Forestay

On a sailing vessel, a forestay, sometimes just called a stay, is a piece of standing rigging which keeps a mast from falling backwards. It is attached either at the very top of the mast, or in fractional rigs between about 1/8 and 1/4 from the top of the mast. The other end of the forestay is attached to the bow of the boat. Often a sail is attached to the forestay. This sail may be a jib or a genoa. In a cutter rig, the jib or jibs are flown from stays in front of the forestay, perhaps going from the masthead to a bowsprit. The sail on the forestay is then referred to as the staysail or stays'l. A forestay might be made from stainless steel wire on a modern yacht, solid stainless steel rod, carbon rod, or ultra high molecular weight polyethylene on a high-performance racing boat, and galvanised wire or natural fibers on an older cutter or square-rigged ship. Contrast with backstay and shrouds.

— Freebase

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "spread out"?
  • A. concentrated
  • B. unfold
  • C. circularise
  • D. dissipate