Synonyms containing cutter-stay fashion Page #6

We've found 3,414 synonyms:

apeek

apeek

A ship drawn directly over the anchor is apeek: when the fore-stay and cable form a line, it is short stay apeek; when in a line with the main-stay, long stay apeek. The anchor is apeek when the cable has been sufficiently hove in to bring the ship over it.--Yards apeek. When they are topped up by contrary lifts. (See PEAK.)

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

a-stay

a-stay

Said of the anchor when, in heaving in, the cable forms such an angle with the surface as to appear in a line with the stays of the ship.--A long stay apeek is when the cable forms an acute angle with the water's surface, or coincides with the main-stay--short stay when it coincides with the fore-stay.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

to peak

to peak

To raise a gaff or lateen yard more obliquely to the mast. To stay peak, or ride a short stay peak, is when the cable and fore-stay form a line: a long peak is when the cable is in line with the main-stay.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

helmet

helmet

A piece of defensive armor or covering for the head. Among the early nations of antiquity the helmet forms a prominent feature in all military costume, and is often of very great utility in distinguishing the age or country of the wearer. The Egyptian kings had them of brass, while the soldiers wore linen ones thickly padded. The crests of the royal Egyptian helmet were the heads of the lion, bull, or dragon. The Milyans had helmets of skins; those of a fox formed the early Thracian helmet; and this ancient fashion of the heroic ages appears in the galerus of the Roman light troops. The Phrygian bonnet was a skull-cap, with a bent peak projecting in front, like the bust of a bird, with an arched neck and head. It is certainly the most ancient form of helmet. Strabo says the ancient Persians, and probably their oriental neighbors, wore modern turbans; in war, a cap cut in the form of a cylinder or tower. This Asiatic fashion extended itself widely. The helmet of the Grecian soldier was usually made of brass, and sometimes of the skins of beasts, with the hair still on; and to render them more terrible, the teeth were often placed in a grinning manner. The crest was made of horse-hair or feathers, and was curiously ornamented. In the early period of the Greeks, helmets had been composed of the skins of quadrupeds, of which none were more common than the dog. After the time of Alexander the Great, common soldiers had only small crests; chieftains, plumes or two crests. The helmet of the Romans was a head-piece of brass or iron, which left the face uncovered, and descended behind as far as the shoulders. Upon the top was the crest, in adorning which the soldiers took great pride. The usual ornament was horse-hair or feathers of divers colors; but the helmets of the officers were sometimes very splendid, and adorned with gold and silver. Helmets occur with cheek-pieces and movable visors. Singular helmets, with aigrettes, plumes, wings, horns, double crests, double-cheek pieces (some of which are seen on the Hamilton vases), and others, with fantastical additions and overloaded crests, are either barbarian, or subsequent to the removal of the seat of empire to Constantinople. The Gauls wore helmets of brass, with monstrous appendages for ostentation, as the shapes of birds, beasts, etc. In the Middle Ages the knights of Europe were distinguished by helmets adorned with the figure of a crown, or of some animal. The king wore a helmet of gold, or gilt; his attendants of silver; the nobility of steel; and the lower orders of iron. In European armies helmets are worn by the horse-guards and heavy cavalry. In the United States, helmets made of felt and adorned with horse-hair plumes are worn by light artillery and cavalry troops.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Outliers, DRG

Outliers, DRG

In health care reimbursement, especially in the prospective payment system, those patients who require an unusually long hospital stay or whose stay generates unusually high costs.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Cookie cutter

Cookie cutter

A cookie cutter in American English and biscuit cutter in Commonwealth English is a tool to cut out cookie/biscuit dough in a particular shape. They are often used for seasonal occasions when well-known decorative shapes are desired, or for large batches of cookies where simplicity and uniformity are required. Cookie cutters have also been used for, among other uses, cutting and shaping tea sandwiches.

— Freebase

Sloop

Sloop

A sloop is a sail boat with a single mast and a fore-and-aft rig. In the USA a sloop may have one, two or three head-sails forward of the mast—the term cutter not generally being used for sailboats. In the rest of the English speaking world, a sloop has only one head-sail and if a vessel has two or more head-sails, she is termed a 'cutter' and her mast may be set further aft than on a sloop. The commonest rig of modern sailboats is the Bermuda sloop. Typically, a modern sloop carries a mainsail on a boom aft of the mast, with a single loose-footed head-sail forward of the mast. Sloops are either masthead-rigged or fractional-rigged. On a masthead-rigged sloop, the forestay attaches at the top of the mast. The mainsail may be smaller than the headsail, which is then called a genoa jib. On a fractional-rigged sloop, the forestay attaches to the mast at a point below the top, typically 3/4 of the way to top, or perhaps 7/8 or some other fraction. The mast of a fractional-rigged sloop may be placed farther forward, and compared to a masthead-rigged sloop, this results in a rather smaller jib relative to the size of the mainsail.

— Freebase

Wovoka

Wovoka

Wovoka, also known as Jack Wilson, was the Northern Paiute religious leader who founded the Ghost Dance movement. Wovoka means "cutter" or "wood cutter" in the Northern Paiute language.

— Freebase

Countersink

Countersink

A countersink is a conical hole cut into a manufactured object, or the cutter used to cut such a hole. A common usage is to allow the head of a countersunk bolt or screw, when placed in the hole, to sit flush with or below the surface of the surrounding material. A countersink may also be used to remove the burr left from a drilling or tapping operation thereby improving the finish of the product and removing any hazardous sharp edges. The basic geometry of a countersink inherently can be applied to the plunging applications described above and also to other milling applications. Therefore countersinks overlap in form, function, and sometimes name with chamfering endmills. Regardless of the name given to the cutter, the surface being generated may be a conical chamfer or a beveled corner for the intersection of two planes.

— Freebase

Planer

Planer

A planer is a type of metalworking machine tool that uses linear relative motion between the workpiece and a single-point cutting tool to machine a linear toolpath. Its cut is analogous to that of a lathe, except that it is linear instead of helical. A planer is analogous to a shaper, but larger, and with the entire workpiece moving on a table beneath the cutter, instead of the cutter riding a ram that moves above a stationary workpiece. The table is moved back and forth on the bed beneath the cutting head either by mechanical means, such as a rack and pinion drive or a leadscrew, or by a hydraulic cylinder.

— Freebase

Shaper

Shaper

A shaper is a type of machine tool that uses linear relative motion between the workpiece and a single-point cutting tool to machine a linear toolpath. Its cut is analogous to that of a lathe, except that it is linear instead of helical. A shaper is analogous to a planer, but smaller, and with the cutter riding a ram that moves above a stationary workpiece, rather than the entire workpiece moving beneath the cutter. The ram is moved back and forth typically by a crank inside the column; hydraulically actuated shapers also exist.

— Freebase

ANCA

ANCA

ANCA Pty Ltd is an Australia company which designs and manufactures computer numerical controlled grinding machines. The company was founded in 1974 by Pat Boland and Pat McCluskey in Melbourne, Australia. ANCA has its headquarters and main manufacturing plant in Melbourne where it employs about 400 people. Since 2006 two additional plants have been opened in Thailand and Taiwan. The company is export-oriented and has expanded its operations by opening sales offices in nine other countries throughout America, Europe and Asia. In 2006 it won three Governor of Victoria Export Awards, and was reported to be a leader in its field of high-end precision grinders that are used in many industries including aeronautics and automotive production. The company produces a range of computer numerical control tool and cutter grinders to meet large-scale manufacturing and entry-level production requirements. The company also produces medical and dental drills. ANCA has exported approximately 4000 machines, and was named Australian Exporter of the Year in 1999. The company is also the world’s leading manufacturer of CNC Tool and Cutter Grinders. Its new subsidiary, ANCA Motion, is supplying computer controls to other Australian manufacturers and exporting to China and Taiwan.

— Freebase

Library of Congress Classification

Library of Congress Classification

The Library of Congress Classification is a system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress. It is used by most research and academic libraries in the U.S. and several other countries. Most public libraries and small academic libraries continue to use the older Dewey Decimal Classification. LCC should not be confused with LCCN, the system of Library of Congress Control Numbers assigned to all books, which also defines URLs of their online catalog entries, such as "82006074" and "http://lccn.loc.gov/82006074". The Classification is also distinct from Library of Congress Subject Headings, the system of labels such as "Boarding schools" and "Boarding schools—Fiction" that describe contents systematically. Finally, the classifications may be distinguished from the call numbers assigned to particular copies of books in the collection, such as "PZ7.J684 Wj 1982 FT MEADE Copy 1" where the classification is "PZ7.J684 Wj 1982". The classification was invented by Herbert Putnam in 1897, just before he assumed the librarianship of Congress. With advice from Charles Ammi Cutter, it was influenced by his Cutter Expansive Classification and by the DDC, Dewey. It was designed specifically for the purposes and collection of the Library of Congress to replace the fixed location system developed by Thomas Jefferson. By the time Putnam departed from his post in 1939, all the classes except K and parts of B were well developed.

— Freebase

Back screen

Back screen

A back screen is a basketball maneuver involving two players, called a cutter and a screener. The screener remains stationary on the court while the cutter moves toward the basket and attempts to use the screener to separate himself from his defender.

— Freebase

TechShop

TechShop

TechShop is a chain of member-based workshops that lets people of all skill levels come in and use industrial tools and equipment to build their own projects. They have three locations in California, one in North Carolina; now closing, one in Michigan, one in Texas, and one in Pennsylvania. Typical tools and equipment offered by TechShop include: ⁕manual mills, Tormach 3 axis CNC mill, and metal lathes. ⁕ShopBot 3 axis CNC router. ⁕welding equipment including MIG, TIG, gas, arc and spot welders. ⁕sheet metal fabrication equipment. ⁕a 4-foot by 12-foot CNC plasma cutter that can cut 1/2" steel plate. ⁕oscilloscopes and other electronics equipment. ⁕a variety of equipment for working with plastics and composites, including carbon fiber. ⁕Epilog Laser Helix laser cutter / engraver units. ⁕a Dimension 3D printer that builds objects by depositing fine layers of ABS plastic via fused deposition modeling. ⁕a textiles area with a variety of home and industrial sewing machines and a large cutting table. TechShop offers safety and basic usage training on all the tools and equipment, and on various other topics. For most equipment, a safety and usage class must be completed before it may be used. Membership is available yearly, monthly, or daily. There are also "family" and "corporate" memberships for a discounted price.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "shopsoiled"?
  • A. hackneyed
  • B. commonplace
  • C. well-worn
  • D. new