Synonyms containing cutter-stay fashion Page #8

We've found 3,417 synonyms:

Lookbook.nu

Lookbook.nu

"Lookbook.nu" is a fashion, youth culture, and community website, created by Yuri Lee in San Francisco. It was inspired by street fashion websites and blogs such as The Sartorialist and The Cobrasnake and designed for users to post their own street-fashion photography, featuring themselves and their outfits. The site has been called the "Digg.com for fashion insiders."

— Wikipedia

Fashion boot

Fashion boot

A fashion boot is a boot worn for reasons of style or fashion (rather than for utilitarian purposes – e.g. not hiking boots, riding boots, rain boots, etc.). The term is usually applied to women's boots. Fashion boots come in a wide variety of styles, from ankle to thigh-length, and are used for casual, formal, and business attire. Although boots were a popular style of women's footwear in the Nineteenth Century, they were not recognized as a high fashion item until the 1960s. They became widely popular in the 1970s and have remained a staple of women's winter wardrobes since then.

— Wikipedia

CanCam

CanCam

CanCam (キャンキャン, Kyankyan) is a Japanese monthly fashion magazine published by Shogakukan. Its name supposedly derives from "I Can Campus", because girls who read it are expected to become "campus leaders". The magazine was created for fashion-conscious consumers, and offers information on fashion, makeup, bags, accessories, and related topics. The magazine is targeted as a mote-kei (モテ系) fashion resource to novice office ladies as well as university students. The magazine has its headquarters in Tokyo.

— Wikipedia

Zilingo

Zilingo

Zilingo is a technology & commerce platform that is re-imagining the fashion industry to make it fair, connected and transparent for all. A commerce platform that enables businesses across the fashion value chain to be more efficient and scale faster, Zilingo connects businesses with a roster of tools and services to operate in fashion - sourcing, selling wholesale or retail, marketing services, software services and financial services. The Singapore headquartered startup was founded in 2015 by Ankiti Bose and Dhruv Kapoor, and has operations spanning Indonesia, Hong Kong, Thailand, Philippines, Australia, India & the United States. Today, the company employs over 600 staff representing more than 20 different nationalities, and works with close to 50,000 partners across the fashion supply chain. These partners comprise manufacturers, retail merchants, distributors, indie & global brands.

— Wikipedia

Ossie Clark

Ossie Clark

Raymond "Ossie" Clark (9 June 1942 – 6 August 1996) was an English fashion designer who was a major figure in the Swinging Sixties scene in London and the fashion industry in that era. Clark is now renowned for his vintage designs by present-day designers. Clark is compared to the 1960s fashion great Biba and influenced many other designers, including Yves Saint Laurent, Anna Sui and Tom Ford. Manolo Blahnik has said of Ossie Clark's work: "He created an incredible magic with the body and achieved what fashion should do—produce desire." Ossie Clark and Ossie Clark for Radley clothes are highly sought after, and are worn by well known models such as Kate Moss and Naomi Campbell.

— Wikipedia

GenArt

GenArt

Gen Art is an arts and entertainment organization that showcases emerging fashion designers, filmmakers, musicians and visual artists. It has produced over 100 events annually, which included fashion shows, film premieres and screenings, live music and art receptions and tours. Gen Art's offices are located in New York City and Los Angeles and since 2014, the company has been headed up by Keri Ingvarsson and a small team of private investors. Previous offices have included San Francisco, Miami and Chicago.On February 21, 2011, Gen Art announced it would return with the 16th Annual Gen Art Film Festival in New York City. Gen Art has since then announced its "Fresh Faces in Fashion Show" during New York Fashion Week 2011, which will feature the designers Ann Yee, ace & jig, Sunghee Bang, Eighteenth, Jennifer Chun, William Okopo, Baron Wells, Collina Strada, Falconiere, Osborn, and Wool and the Gang.

— Wikipedia

Lauren Conrad

Lauren Conrad

Lauren Katherine Tell (née Conrad; born February 1, 1986) is an American television personality, fashion designer, and author. In September 2004, an 18-year-old Conrad came to prominence after being cast in the reality television series Laguna Beach: The Real Orange County, which documented her and her friends' lives in their hometown of Laguna Beach, California. Conrad later moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career in the fashion industry, and received her own spin-off series The Hills in May 2006. It followed the personal and professional lives of her and friends Heidi Montag, Audrina Patridge, and Whitney Port. As the series progressed, a widely publicized feud between Conrad, Montag, and Montag's boyfriend Spencer Pratt became the central focus of the series, and was carried through each subsequent season in which Conrad was featured. During its production, she also attended the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising and worked for Teen Vogue and Kelly Cutrone's PR firm People's Revolution. Conrad left The Hills after five seasons, and was replaced by former Laguna Beach co-star Kristin Cavallari in May 2009. She filmed an alternate ending for the series finale in July 2010, which was broadcast in August 2013. Conrad is the founder of the fashion lines LC Lauren Conrad and Paper Crown, and the co-founder of the fair trade online store The Little Market. She has published nine books, including L.A. Candy and The Fame Game trilogies.

— Wikipedia

Future Group

Future Group

Future Group is an Indian conglomerate company founded by Kishore Biyani, headquartered in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. The company is known for having a significant prominence in Indian retail and fashion sectors, with popular supermarket chains like Big Bazaar and Food Bazaar, lifestyle stores like Brand Factory, Central, etc. The group also has a notable presence in integrated foods and FMCG manufacturing sectors. Future Retail Limited and Future Lifestyle Fashions Limited, two operating companies of Future Group, are among the top retail companies listed in BSE with respect to assets, and in NSE with respect to market capitalisation.Future Group is a corporate group and nearly all of its businesses are managed through its various operating companies based on the target sectors. For e.g., retail supermarket/hypermarket chains Big Bazaar, FBB, Food Bazaar, Food Hall, Hometown, etc. are operated by its retail division, Future Retail Limited, while its fashion and clothing outlets Brand Factory, Central, and Planet Sports are operated via another of its subsidiaries, Future Lifestyle Fashions Limited. Furniture is retailed through HomeTown stores in major cities and online. With these many fashion outlets and supermarkets, the group also promotes its fashion and sports brands like Indigo Nation, Spalding, Lombard, Bare, etc., and FMCGs like Tasty Treat, Fresh & Pure, Clean Mate, Ektaa, Premium Harvest, Sach, etc. It also has operating companies to cater specifically to internal financial matters and consulting within its group of companies.

— Wikipedia

Trim

Trim

Trim or trimming in clothing and home decorating is applied ornament, such as gimp, passementerie, ribbon, ruffles, or, as a verb, to apply such ornament. Before the industrial revolution, all trim was made and applied by hand, thus making heavily trimmed furnishings and garments expensive and high-status. Machine-woven trims and sewing machines put these dense trimmings within the reach of even modest dressmakers and home sewers, and an abundance of trimming is a characteristic of mid-Victorian fashion. As a predictable reaction, high fashion came to emphasize exquisiteness of cut and construction over denseness of trimming, and applied trim became a signifier of mass-produced clothing by the 1930s. The iconic braid and gold button trim of the Chanel suit are a notable survival of trim in high fashion. In home decorating, the 1980s and 1990s saw a fashion for dense, elaborately layered trimmings on upholstered furniture and drapery. Today, most trimmings are commercially manufactured. Scalamandré is known for elaborate trim for home furnishings, and Wrights is a leading manufacturer of trim for home sewing and crafts. Trims are used generally to enhance the beauty of the garments. It attracts buyers. Appropriate use of it creates more value of the product.

— Freebase

Haute couture

Haute couture

Haute couture refers to the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Haute couture is made to order for a specific customer, and it is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable seamstresses, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. "Couture" means dressmaking, sewing, or needlework and is also used as a common abbreviation of haute couture and refers to the same thing in spirit. "Haute" means elegant or high. An haute couture garment is made specifically for the wearer’s measurements and body stance. It originally referred to Englishman Charles Frederick Worth's work, produced in Paris in the mid-nineteenth century. In modern France, haute couture is a "protected name" that can be used only by firms that meet certain well-defined standards. However, the term is also used loosely to describe all high-fashion custom-fitted clothing, whether it is produced in Paris or in other fashion capitals such as London, Milan, New York or Tokyo. The term can refer to: ⁕the fashion houses or fashion designers that create exclusive and often trend-setting fashions

— Freebase

Zara

Zara

Zara is a Spanish clothing and accessories retailer based in Arteixo, Galicia, and founded in 1975 by Amancio Ortega and Rosalía Mera. It is the flagship chain store of the Inditex group; the fashion group also owns brands such as Massimo Dutti, Pull and Bear, Uterqüe, Stradivarius and Bershka. It is claimed that Zara needs just two weeks to develop a new product and get it to stores, compared to the six-month industry average, and launches around 10,000 new designs each year. Zara has resisted the industry-wide trend towards transferring fast fashion production to low-cost countries. Perhaps its most unusual strategy was its policy of zero advertising; the company preferred to invest a percentage of revenues in opening new stores instead. This has increased the idea of Zara as a "fashion imitator" company and low cost products. Lack of advertisement is also in contrast to direct competitors such as Uniqlo and United Colors of Benetton. Zara was described by Louis Vuitton Fashion Director Daniel Piette as "possibly the most innovative and devastating retailer in the world." Zara has also been described as a "Spanish success story" by CNN.

— Freebase

Ready-to-wear

Ready-to-wear

Ready-to-wear or prêt-à-porter is the term for factory-made clothing, sold in finished condition, in standardized sizes, as distinct from made to measure or bespoke clothing tailored to a particular person's frame. Off-the-peg is sometimes used for items which are not clothing, such as handbags. Ready-to-wear has rather different connotations in the spheres of fashion and classic clothing. In the fashion industry, designers produce ready-to-wear clothing intended to be worn without significant alteration, because clothing made to standard sizes fits most people. They use standard patterns, factory equipment, and faster construction techniques to keep costs low, compared to a custom-sewn version of the same item. Some fashion houses and fashion designers produce mass-produced and industrially manufactured ready-to-wear lines, while others offer garments that, while not unique, are produced in limited numbers.

— Freebase

Fashion Police

Fashion Police

Fashion Police is an American television program airing on E! Entertainment Television. Fashion Police is Hosted by Louise Roe who as it just said is the host of the show as she is a fashion journalist. The program, which debuted on September 10, 2010, features hosts Joan Rivers, Giuliana Rancic, Kelly Osbourne and George Kotsiopoulos commenting on celebrity fashions. Guest hosts have included Khloé Kardashian Odom, Ryan Lochte, Scott Disick, Jay Manuel, Nicki Minaj, Aubrey O'Day, Ali Fedotowsky, Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi, Ciara, Melanie Brown, Tori Spelling, Kimora Lee Simmons, Chelsea Kane, Mischa Barton, Kylie Minogue and Joan's daughter Melissa Rivers, who is also executive producer. In 2010, the series returned to E! hosting the program running the day after events rather than airing live from the red carpet. The series became a weekly program on September 10, 2010 where they continue to discuss the dos and don'ts of celebrity fashion. The show started as a half-hour program, but expanded to one hour on March 9, 2012.

— Freebase

Streetwear

Streetwear

Street wear is a distinctive style of street fashion. Rooted in West Coast surf and skate culture, it has grown to encompass elements of hip hop fashion, Japanese street fashion, and modern Haute couture fashion.

— Freebase

Ballet flat

Ballet flat

Ballet flats or Dolly shoes are derived from a woman's soft ballet slipper, with a very thin heel or the appearance of no heel at all. The style sometimes features a ribbon-like binding around the low tops of the slipper and may have a slight gathering at the top-front of the vamp and a tiny, decorative string tie. Ballet slippers can be adjusted and tightened to the wearer's foot by means of this string tie. The essence of the ballet flat has existed since at least the 16th century, in which men wore a similar shoe, then known as pompes. In medieval times ballet flats were popular with both men and women. They only came out of fashion in the 17th and 18th centuries when the high-heeled shoe came into fashion after Catherine de' Medici requested that her cobbler add two inches to her wedding shoes. Heels went out of fashion quickly after Marie Antoinette walked to the guillotine in a pair of heels. Functional shoes: sandals, boots, and flat shoes prevailed in the 19th century. Ballet flats took off again when Audrey Hepburn wore them with skinny jeans in Funny Face in 1957. More recently, variations of ballet flats have returned as a current fashion trend, often referred to as ballet pumps or ballet sneakers and designed for outdoor wear, using a variety of fabrics and usually with a rubber sole.

— Freebase

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
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  • D. reject