Synonyms containing deemster (Isle of Man) Page #5

We've found 10,305 synonyms:

Ayre

Ayre

an area of the Isle of Man

— Wiktionary

deemster

deemster

A judge on the Isle of Man.

— Wiktionary

House of Keys

House of Keys

The lower house of the Tynwald, the Isle of Man parliament.

— Wiktionary

Colby

Colby

A village in the Isle of Man.

— Wiktionary

Patrick

Patrick

A parish of the Isle of Man.

— Wiktionary

UK £

UK £

The pound sterling, commonly known simply as the pound, is the official currency of the United Kingdom, the British Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man, the British Overseas Territories of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, the British Antarctic Territory and Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha. It is subdivided into 100 pence. A number of nations that do not use sterling also have currencies called the "pound". The British Crown dependencies of Guernsey and Jersey produce their own local issues of sterling: 'Guernsey pound' and 'Jersey pound'. The pound sterling is also used in the Isle of Man, Gibraltar, the Falkland Islands, and Saint Helena and Ascension Island in Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha. Manx, Gibraltar, Falkland Islands and Saint Helena pounds are separate currencies, pegged at parity to the pound sterling. Within the UK, some banks operating in Scotland and Northern Ireland produce private sterling denominated banknotes.

— Freebase

Marilyn

Marilyn

A Marilyn is a mountain or hill in the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland or Isle of Man with a relative height of at least 150 metres, regardless of absolute height or other merit. The name was coined as a punning contrast to the designation Munro, used of a Scottish mountain with a height of more than 3,000 feet, which is homophonous with Monroe. There are 2,009 Marilyns identified: 1,216 in Scotland, 455 in Ireland, 176 in England, 157 in Wales, 5 on the Isle of Man. Black Mountain, in the Black Mountains, on the border between England and Wales, was formerly counted in both countries but is now treated as being in Wales only. The list of Marilyns in Britain was compiled by Alan Dawson in his book The Relative Hills of Britain, and continues to change as resurveying produces revised heights for hills and the passes between them. The list was extended into Ireland by Clem Clements in a booklet, The Hewitts and Marilyns of Ireland. Although many of the islands' largest hills including Ben Nevis, Carrantuohill, Scafell Pike and Snowdon are Marilyns, many other large hills such as Cairngorm, a number of Munros, and other well-known hills such as Bowfell, the Langdale Pikes and Carnedd Dafydd, are not Marilyns because they do not have sufficient relative height. However, some lower hills such as Seatallan and Watch Hill on the edges of Lakeland and the Long Mynd in Shropshire do qualify because of their isolation from higher hills. Not all of the Marilyns are even hills in the usual sense: one, the highest point of the Weald, lies within the East Sussex town of Crowborough, whilst the top of the Yorkshire Wolds, Bishop Wilton Wold lies alongside the A166 road. At the other extreme are Stac Lee and Stac an Armin, the two highest sea stacks in the British Isles, in the St Kilda archipelago, over 81 miles west of the Scottish mainland.

— Freebase

Pound sterling

Pound sterling

The pound sterling, commonly known simply as the pound, is the official currency of the United Kingdom, Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, the British Antarctic Territory, and Tristan da Cunha. It is subdivided into 100 pence. A number of nations that do not use sterling also have currencies called the pound. At various times, the pound sterling was commodity money or bank notes backed by silver or gold, but it is currently fiat money, backed only by the economy in the areas where it is accepted. The pound sterling is the world's oldest currency still in use. The British Crown dependencies of Guernsey and Jersey produce their own local issues of sterling: "Guernsey pound" and "Jersey pound". The pound sterling is also used in the Isle of Man, Gibraltar, the Falkland Islands, Saint Helena and Ascension Island in Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha. The Bank of England is the central bank for the pound sterling, issuing its own coins and banknotes, and regulating issuance of banknotes by private banks in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

— Freebase

Dempster.

Dempster.

Same as Deemster (q.v. under Deem).

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Doomster

Doomster

The official in the Scottish High Court who pronounced the doom to the prisoner, and also acted as executioner. In Jersey and the Isle of Man a judge is styled a “Deemster.”

— Etymology and Origins

High Court of Tynwald

High Court of Tynwald

The High Court of Tynwald is the parliament of the Isle of Man and has an unlimited, but not necessarily exclusive, legislative competence. Tynwald is of Norse origin and over 1,000 years old, and is thus the oldest parliament in the world with an unbroken existence.

— Editors Contribution

Quayle

Quayle

Quayle is a surname of Anglo-Celtic origin, specifically English, Irish, Manx and Scottish.When the name originates from Ireland, the Isle of Man and Scotland it is an Anglicisation of the Gaelic Mac Phàil (Scottish) Mac Phóil (Irish) "Mac Phaayl" (Manx) meaning "son of Pàil/Póil/Paayl". These are Gaelic patronymic forms of the personal name Paul. When originating in Ireland the name is sometimes a variant of the surname Quill. When Quayle is of English origin the surname can be derived from the Old French/Middle English quaille, meaning "quail". In this way the name would be used as a nickname for a timorous, lecherous, or fat person - words that all describe this particular bird. The name is recorded in the Isle of Man as MacFayle in 1511, and MacQuayle, Quayle in 1540. The name is recorded in England as Quayle in 1327.

— Wikipedia

Trinacria

Trinacria

The Greek word Trinacria means "three pointed", from akra, "end, point, peak, headland" plus treis, "three", and is the earliest known name of the island of Sicily, formerly a Greek possession, so named from its triangular shape. Sicily was also later known by the Romans by its Greek name Trinacria. The ancient symbol of Trinacria is the head of Medusa (a gorgon with a head of snakes) overlaying three legs conjoined at the hips and flexed in triangle and three stalks of wheat. The Trinacria symbol has also been adopted by the modern Sicilian government and appears at the center of Sicily's flag. The symbol (without the central Gorgon's head) was adopted as the heraldic device of the Lord of the Isle of Man (located between England, Scotland and Ireland) in the 13th century and appears on the present coat of arms of the Isle of Man.

— Wikipedia

Thomas and the Magic Railroad

Thomas and the Magic Railroad

Thomas and the Magic Railroad is a 2000 British-American fantasy comedy film written, produced and directed by Britt Allcroft. The film stars Alec Baldwin as Mr. Conductor, Peter Fonda, Mara Wilson, Didi Conn, Russell Means, Cody McMains, Michael E. Rodgers, Eddie Glen as the voice of Thomas, Neil Crone as the voice of Diesel 10, and Kevin Frank. The film is based on the British children's book series The Railway Series by The Rev. W. Awdry, its televised adaptation Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends, and the American television series Shining Time Station by Britt Allcroft and Rick Siggelkow. It was co-produced by Gullane Pictures and the Isle of Man Film Commission. It was distributed by Destination Films in the United States, Icon Film Distribution in the United Kingdom, and ABC Films in Australia. The film tells the story of Lily Stone, the granddaughter of the caretaker of an enchanted steam engine who is lacking an appropriate supply of coal, and Mr. Conductor of Shining Time Station, whose provisions of magical gold dust are at a critical low. To ameliorate these problems, Lily and Mr. Conductor enlist the help of Thomas, who confronts the ruthless and devious Diesel 10 who plans to get rid of the railway's steam engines along the way. Plans for an original Thomas and Friends film started with Paramount Pictures but did not pull through. Shortly afterward, Destination Films began funding for the film and started production in 1998. Filming took place at the Strasburg Railroad, Toronto, Canada, and the Isle of Man. It held its world premiere at the Odeon Leicester Square in the United Kingdom on July 9, 2000. The film was condemned by critics, mainly from US upon release, with criticism directed towards the acting, plot, special effects, and lack of fidelity towards the source material. It was also nearly a box office bomb, grossing $19.7 million worldwide against a production budget of $19 million, but still continues with it's merchandising. Due to the film's performance, Allcroft was forced to resign from her company in September 2000. HiT Entertainment acquired the company two years later, including the television rights to Thomas.

— Wikipedia

Cannell

Cannell

Cannell is a chiefly Manx surname which is derived from the Gaelic/Celtic McConnell or O'Connell. Cannell is one of the earliest recorded surnames on the Isle of Man. An Ogham Stone from the 5th century A.D found at Ballaqueeny on the Isle of Man reads that this is the stone of "Bivadonis Maqi Mucoi Cunava(li)" Cunava or Cunavali being the tribal name predating Cannell (Connell, O'Connell, McConnell etc.) In English translates as "Bivadonis Son of the tribe Cunava". The Cunavali originated around County Louth in Ireland. They are considered "Cruithne" or Irish Picts, the race existing before Celtic immigration.

— Wikipedia

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. protagonist
  • B. opposer
  • C. opponent
  • D. adversary