Synonyms containing deemster (Isle of Man) Page #7

We've found 10,303 synonyms:

solent

Solent

a strait of the English Channel between the coast of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight

— Princeton's WordNet

wight

Wight, Isle of Wight

an isle and county of southern England in the English Channel

— Princeton's WordNet

Mainland

Mainland

Mainland is a name given to a large landmass in a region, or to the largest of a group of islands in an archipelago. Sometimes its residents are called "Mainlanders". Because of its larger area, a mainland almost always has a much larger population than its associated islands, and mainlander culture and politics sometimes threaten to dominate those of the islands. Prominent uses of the term include: ⁕Mainland Argentina, as opposed to Tierra del Fuego. The term may be applied by Argentines to the British Overseas Territories of the Falkland Islands and South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, whose claim is disputed by Argentina. The use of 'mainland' in this context is discouraged by the people of the two territories, who class themselves as British citizens. ⁕Mainland Australia, as opposed to Tasmania. ⁕Mainland Britain:, as opposed to Northern Ireland, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man. On the Isle of Wight in 1982, Paul Theroux overheard residents at Ventnor: "and now they were talking about 'the mainland', as if we were far at sea and not twenty minutes by ferry from Portsmouth". ⁕Mainland Canada, as opposed to Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, Cape Breton Island or Vancouver Island;

— Freebase

bloke

bloke

A man, a fellow; an ordinary man, a man on the street.

— Wiktionary

charity

charity

Christian love; representing God's love of man, man's love of God, or man's love of his fellow-men.

— Wiktionary

big lug

big lug

A term of affection and endearment describing a man whose personality traits reflect the opposite of his overall broad physique. For example, a man may be tall, physically built but isn't afraid to express his overall feelings and emotions. In other words, a big lug is a man that acts the opposite of what his overall image reflects, or acts against the stereotypical image of the tough guy.

— Wiktionary

graven

graven

Something fashioned by man, or something man-made. Anything made by man's hands.

— Wiktionary

man page

man page

A page from the Unix Programmer's Manual, documenting one of Unix's many commands, system calls, library subroutines, device driver interfaces, file formats, games, macro packages, or maintenance utilities. By extension, the term “man page” may be used to refer to documentation of any kind, under any system, though it is most likely to be confined to short on-line references.As mentioned in Chapter 11, Other Lexicon Conventions, there is a standard syntax for referring to man page entries: the phrase “foo(n)” refers to the page for “foo” in chapter n of the manual, where chapter 1 is user commands, chapter 2 is system calls, etc.The man page format is beloved, or berated, for having the same sort of pithy utility as the rest of Unix. Man pages tend to be written as very compact, concise descriptions which are complete but not forgiving of the lazy or careless reader. Their stylized format does a good job of summarizing the essentials: invocation syntax, options, basic functionality. While such a concise reference is perfect for the do-one-thing-and-do-it-well tools which are favored by the Unix philosophy, it admittedly breaks down when applied to a command which is itself a major subsystem.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

bridge-islet

bridge-islet

A portion of land which becomes insular at high-water--as Old Woman's Isle at Bombay, and among others, the celebrated Lindisfarne, thus tidally sung by Scott:-- "The tide did now his flood-mark gain, And girdled in the saint's domain: For, with the flow and ebb, its style Varies from continent to isle; Dry-shod, o'er sands, twice ev'ry day The pilgrims to the shrine find way; Twice every day the waves efface Of staves and sandall'd feet the trace."

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

3D FUTURE VISION II

3D FUTURE VISION II

3D FUTURE VISION II, INC. operates as a 3D digital signage technology and movie production company. It specializes in 3D digital signage, film, and video production operations. The company offers 3D digital signage systems, which are mounted and placed in various areas for displaying advertising or selling advertisements to other companies that could be displayed at high shopper traffic in super markets, end isle displays, special event displays, and check out areas. It also provides 2D to 3D conversion services; and creates content that includes animated advertisements or commercials. The company was incorporated in 2011 and is based in Longwood, Florida.

— CrunchBase

Cain, Thomas Henry Hall

Cain, Thomas Henry Hall

eminent novelist, born in Cheshire, of Manx blood; began life as architect and took to journalism; author of a number of novels bearing on Manx life, such as the "Deemster" and the "Manxman"; his most recent novel, the "Christian," his greatest but most ambiguous work, and much challenged in England, though less so in America; it has been translated into most of the languages of Europe, where the verdict is divided; b. 1853.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Amlwch

Amlwch

Amlwch (; Welsh: [ˈamlʊχ]) is the most northerly town in Wales and is a community. It is situated on the north coast of the Isle of Anglesey, on the A5025 which connects it to Holyhead and to Menai Bridge. As well as Amlwch town and Amlwch Port, other settlements within the community include Burwen, Porthllethog/Bull Bay and Pentrefelin. The town has a beach in Llaneilian, and it has significant coastal cliffs. Tourism is an important element of the local economy. At one time it was a booming mining town that became the centre of a vast global trade in copper ore. The harbour inlet became a busy port and significant shipbuilding and ship repair centre, as well as an embarkation point with boats sailing to the Isle of Man and to Liverpool.

— Wikipedia

stadia

stadia

A very simple aid in estimating distances, consists of a small stick, held vertically in the hand at arm’s length, and bringing the top of a man’s head in line with the top of the stick, noting where a line in the eye of the observer to the feet of the man cuts the stick or stadia, as it is called. To graduate the stadia, a man of the ordinary height of a foot-soldier, say 5 feet 8 inches, is placed at a known distance, say 50 yards, and the distance on the stick covered by him when it is held at arm’s length is marked and divided into eight equal parts. If the distance is now increased until the man covers only one of these divisions, we know he is at a distance equal to 50 × 8 = 400 yards. This instrument is not very accurate, except for short distances. A much more accurate stadia is constructed by making use of a metal plate having a slit in it in the form of an isosceles triangle, the base of which, held at a certain distance from the edge, subtends a man (5 feet 8 inches), say at the distance of 100 yards. A slider moves along the triangle, being always parallel to the base, and the length of it comprised between the two sides of the triangle represents the height of men at different distances, which are marked in yards on the side of the triangle, above or below, according as the object looked at is a foot-soldier or horseman. In order to keep the stadia always at the same distance from the eye, a string is attached to the slider, the opposite end having a knot tied in it, which is held between the teeth while using the instrument, which is held in the right hand, the slider being moved with the left-hand finger. The string should always be kept stretched when the instrument is used, and the line in a vertical position. It must be graduated experimentally by noting the positions in which the slider represents the height of the object. The instrument used is not, however, reliable. Its uncertainty increases in an equal ratio with the distance of the object observed. At the extreme ranges it is quite useless. At the school for firing, at Vincennes, therefore, they rely entirely on the eye alone for the judgment of distances, and great pains by careful practice and instruction is taken to perfect that judgment. A simple instrument by which distances can be determined is, therefore, still a great desideratum.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Leading man

Leading man

Leading man or leading gentleman is an informal term for the actor who plays a love interest to the leading actress in a film or play. A leading man is usually an all rounder; capable of singing, dancing, and acting at a professional level, outshining his female co-star. A good leading man could make a bad actress look better than she was and a good actress shine. A leading man can also be an actor who is often seen in romantic roles. An example of this would be Bruce Cabot's role in King Kong. Less frequently, the epithet has been applied to an actor who is often associated with one particular actress, for example, Errol Flynn was Olivia de Havilland's leading man in several films, Spencer Tracy had a similar association with Katharine Hepburn; used in this sense, however, the woman is usually described as the leading lady of the man. The term is also used collectively, as in 'Hollywood's leading men' to refer to a group of notable, famous or popular actors. Some examples of modern leading men include Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Hugh Jackman, and Daniel Craig.

— Freebase

Man-hour

Man-hour

A man-hour or person-hour is the amount of work performed by the average worker in one hour. It is used in written "estimates" for estimation of the total amount of uninterrupted labour required to perform a task. For example, researching and writing a college paper might require twenty man-hours. Preparing a family banquet from scratch might require ten man-hours. Man-hours do not take account of the breaks that people generally require from work, e.g. for rest, eating, and other bodily functions. They only count pure labour. Managers count the man-hours and add break time to estimate the amount of time a task will actually take to complete. Thus, while one college course's written paper might require twenty man-hours to carry out, it almost certainly will not get done in twenty consecutive hours. Its progress will be interrupted by work for other courses, meals, sleep, and other distractions.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. harmfully
  • B. noxiously
  • C. detrimentally
  • D. harmlessly