Synonyms containing departure point

We've found 11,200 synonyms:

Point

Point

point, n. anything coming to a sharp end: the mark made by a sharp instrument: (geom.) that which has position but not length, breadth, or thickness: a mark showing the divisions of a sentence: (mus.) a dot at the right hand of a note to lengthen it by one-half: needle-point lace: a very small space: a moment of time: a small affair: a single thing: a single assertion: the precise thing to be considered: anything intended: exact place: degree: the unit of count in a game: (print.) a unit of measurement for type-bodies: an advantage: that which stings, as the point of an epigram: an imaginary relish, in 'potatoes and point:' a lively turn of thought: that which awakens attention: a peculiarity, characteristic: (cricket) the fielder standing at the immediate right of the batsman, and slightly in advance: a signal given by a trumpet: (pl.) chief or excellent features, as of a horse, &c.: the switch or movable rails which allow a train to pass from one line to another.—v.t. to give a point to: to sharpen: to aim: to direct one's attention: to punctuate, as a sentence: to fill the joints of with mortar, as a wall.—v.i. to direct the finger, the eye, or the mind towards an object: to show game by looking, as a dog.—adj. Point′ed, having a sharp point: sharp: intended for some particular person: personal: keen: telling: (archit.) having sharply-pointed arches, Gothic.—adv. Point′edly.—ns. Point′edness; Point′er, that which points: a dog trained to point out game; Point′ing, the act of sharpening: the marking of divisions in writing by points or marks: act of filling the crevices of a wall with mortar; Point′ing-stock, a thing to be pointed at, a laughing-stock; Point′-lace, a fine kind of lace wrought with the needle.—adj. Point′less, having no point: blunt: dull: wanting keenness or smartness; Points′man, a man who has charge of the points or switches on a railway; Point′-sys′tem, a standard system of sizes for type-bodies, one point being .0138 inch.—Point for point, exactly: all particulars; Point of order, a question raised in a deliberative society as to whether proceedings are according to the rules; Point of view, the position from which one looks at anything; Point out (B.), to assign; Points of the compass, the points north, south, east, and west, along with the twenty-eight smaller divisions, marked on the card of the mariner's compass.—At all points, completely; At, or On, the point of, just about to; Cardinal point (see Cardinal); Carry one's point, to gain what one contends for in controversy; From point to point, from one particular to another; Give points to, to give odds to: to give an advantageous hint on any subject; In point, apposite; In point of, with regard to; Make a point of, to attach special importance to; Stand upon points, to be over-scrupulous; Strain a point, to go beyond proper limits; To the point, appropriate. [O. Fr.,—L. punctumpungĕre, to prick.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Point process

Point process

In statistics and probability theory, a point process or point field is a collection of mathematical points randomly located on some underlying mathematical space such as the real line, the Cartesian plane, or more abstract spaces. Point processes can be used as mathematical models of phenomena or objects representable as points in some type of space. There are different mathematical interpretations of a point process, such as a random counting measure or a random set. Some authors regard a point process and stochastic process as two different objects such that a point process is a random object that arises from or is associated with a stochastic process, though it has been remarked that the difference between point processes and stochastic processes is not clear. Others consider a point process as a stochastic process, where the process is indexed by sets of the underlying space on which it is defined, such as the real line or n {\displaystyle n} -dimensional Euclidean space. Other stochastic processes such as renewal and counting processes are studied in the theory of point processes. Sometimes the term "point process" is not preferred, as historically the word "process" denoted an evolution of some system in time, so point process is also called a random point field.Point processes are well studied objects in probability theory and the subject of powerful tools in statistics for modeling and analyzing spatial data, which is of interest in such diverse disciplines as forestry, plant ecology, epidemiology, geography, seismology, materials science, astronomy, telecommunications, computational neuroscience, economics and others. Point processes on the real line form an important special case that is particularly amenable to study, because the points are ordered in a natural way, and the whole point process can be described completely by the (random) intervals between the points. These point processes are frequently used as models for random events in time, such as the arrival of customers in a queue (queueing theory), of impulses in a neuron (computational neuroscience), particles in a Geiger counter, location of radio stations in a telecommunication network or of searches on the world-wide web.

— Wikipedia

Centre

Centre

Center, sen′tėr, n. the middle point of anything, esp. a circle or sphere: the middle: the point toward which all things move or are drawn: the chief leader of an organisation—head-centre: the men of moderate political opinions in the French Chamber, sitting right in front of the president, with extreme men on the right and on the left—further subdivisions are Right-centre and Left-centre: the Ultramontane party in Germany.—v.t. to place on or collect to a centre.—v.i. to be placed in the middle:—pr.p. cen′tring, cen′tering; pa.p. cen′tred, cen′tered.—adj. Cen′tral, belonging to the centre, principal, dominant: belonging to a nerve-centre, of affections caused by injury to the brain or spinal cord.—ns. Centralisā′tion, Cen′tralism, the tendency to administer by the sovereign or central government matters which would be otherwise under local management.—v.t. Cen′tralise, to draw to a centre.—n. Central′ity, central position.—advs. Cen′trally, Cen′trically.—ns. Cen′tre-bit, a joiner's tool, turning on a centre, for boring circular holes—one of the chief tools of the burglar; Cen′tre-board, a shifting keel, fitted to drop below and in line with the keel proper in order to increase or diminish the draught of a boat—much used in United States racing yachts; Cen′tre-piece, an ornament for the middle of a table, ceiling, &c.—adjs. Cen′tric, Cen′trical, relating to, placed in, or containing the centre.—ns. Cen′tricalness, Centric′ity; Cen′trum, the body of a vertebra.—Central fire, said of a cartridge in which the fulminate is placed in the centre of the base, as opposed to rim fire; Central forces, forces whose action is to cause a moving body to tend towards a fixed point called the centre of force.—Centre of attraction, the point to which bodies tend by the force of gravity; Centre of buoyancy, or displacement, the point in an immersed body at which the resultant vertical pressure may be supposed to act; Centre of gravity, a certain point, invariably situated with regard to the body, through which the resultant of the attracting forces between the earth and its several molecules always passes; Centre of inertia, or mass, the centre of a set of parallel forces acting on all the particles of a body, each force being proportional to the mass of the particle on which it acts; Centre of oscillation, the point in a body occupied by that particle which is accelerated and retarded to an equal amount, and which therefore moves as if it were a single pendulum unconnected with the rest of the body; Centre of percussion, the point in which the direction of a blow, given to a body, intersects the plane in which the fixed axis and the centre of inertia lie, making the body begin to rotate about a fixed axis, without causing any pressure on the axis; Centre of pressure, the point at which the direction of a single force, which is equivalent to the fluid pressure on the plane surface, meets the surface. [Fr.,—L. centrum—Gr. kentron, a sharp point

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Time point

Time point

In music a time point or timepoint (point in time) is "an instant, analogous to a geometrical point in space". Because it has no duration, it literally cannot be heard, but it may be used to represent "the point of initiation of a single pitch, the repetition of a pitch, or a pitch simultaneity", therefore the beginning of a sound, rather than its duration. It may also designate the release of a note or the point within a note at which something changes (such as dynamic level). Other terms often used in music theory and analysis are attack point and starting point. Milton Babbitt calls the distance from one time point, attack, or starting point to the next a time-point interval, independent of the durations of the sounding notes which may be either shorter than the time-point interval (resulting in a silence before the next time point), or longer (resulting in overlapping notes). Charles Wuorinen shortens this expression to just time interval. Other writers use the terms attack interval, or (translating the German "Einsatzabstand"), interval of entry, interval of entrance, or starting interval.

— Wikipedia

Nonpoint source pollution

Nonpoint source pollution

Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution is pollution resulting from many diffuse sources, in direct contrast to point source pollution which results from a single source. Nonpoint source pollution generally results from land runoff, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, drainage, seepage, or hydrological modification (rainfall and snowmelt) where tracing pollution back to a single source is difficult.Non-point source water pollution affects a water body from sources such as polluted runoff from agricultural areas draining into a river, or wind-borne debris blowing out to sea. Non-point source air pollution affects air quality from sources such as smokestacks or car tailpipes. Although these pollutants have originated from a point source, the long-range transport ability and multiple sources of the pollutant make it a non-point source of pollution. Non-point source pollution can be contrasted with point source pollution, where discharges occur to a body of water or into the atmosphere at a single location. NPS may derive from many different sources with no specific solution may change to rectify the problem, making it difficult to regulate. Non point source water pollution is difficult to control because it comes from the everyday activities of many different people, such as lawn fertilization, applying pesticides, road construction or building construction.It is the leading cause of water pollution in the United States today, with polluted runoff from agriculture and hydromodification the primary sources. Other significant sources of runoff include habitat modification and silviculture (forestry).Contaminated stormwater washed off parking lots, roads and highways, and lawns (often containing fertilizers and pesticides) is called urban runoff. This runoff is often classified as a type of NPS pollution. Some people may also consider it a point source because many times it is channeled into municipal storm drain systems and discharged through pipes to nearby surface waters. However, not all urban runoff flows through storm drain systems before entering water bodies. Some may flow directly into water bodies, especially in developing and suburban areas. Also, unlike other types of point sources, such as industrial discharges, sewage treatment plants and other operations, pollution in urban runoff cannot be attributed to one activity or even group of activities. Therefore, because it is not caused by an easily identified and regulated activity, urban runoff pollution sources are also often treated as true non-point sources as municipalities work to abate them.

— Wikipedia

Exit

Exit

eks′it, n. a direction in playbooks to an actor to go off the stage: the departure of a player from the stage: any departure: a way of departure: a passage out: a quitting of the world's stage, or life: death:—pl. Ex′eunt.—v.i. to make an exit. [L. exit, he goes out, exeunt, they go out—exīre, to go out—ex, out, and īre, itum, to go.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

decease

decease

Departure, especially departure from this life

— Wiktionary

Microscopy, Electron, Scanning

Microscopy, Electron, Scanning

Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Departure

Departure

Departure is Journey's sixth album. It was released in March 1980 on the Columbia Records label. Departure would be the band's highest charting album to date, giving Journey their first appearance in the top 10 of the Billboard album charts, peaking at #8. The album includes "Any Way You Want It", the lead off track and top 25 single. The album featured an edgier sound, thanks partly to the "live in studio" way the songs were recorded. The band went into The Automatt studio with 19 tracks, eventually trimming down to 12. The album would mark the last full-time studio album appearance of founding member Gregg Rolie, and his penultimate recording with the band: his final contributions would appear on Dream, After Dream, a soundtrack album to the Japanese film of the same name, which would also be released in 1980. Rolie had become tired of life on the road and decided to leave the band after assisting in the selection of his replacement, Jonathan Cain, then of The Babys. Rolie sang lead vocals on only one song on Departure— the ballad "Someday Soon". The Departure Tour was one of the first Journey shows to feature pyrotechnics, as a measure before the line "That gunshot echoed through the town" on the song Line of Fire, a burst of fire came through either side of the stage.

— Freebase

Dew point

Dew point

The dew point is the temperature below which the water vapor in a volume of humid air at a given constant barometric pressure will condense into liquid water at the same rate at which it evaporates. Condensed water is called dew when it forms on a solid surface. The dew point is a water-to-air saturation temperature. The dew point is associated with relative humidity. A high relative humidity indicates that the dew point is closer to the current air temperature. Relative humidity of 100% indicates the dew point is equal to the current temperature and that the air is maximally saturated with water. When the dew point remains constant and temperature increases, relative humidity decreases. General aviation pilots use dew-point data to calculate the likelihood of carburetor icing and fog, and to estimate the height of the cloud base. At a given temperature but independent of barometric pressure, the dew point is a consequence of the absolute humidity, the mass of water per unit volume of air. If both the temperature and pressure rise, however, the dew point will rise and the relative humidity will lower accordingly. Reducing the absolute humidity without changing other variables will bring the dew point back down to its initial value. In the same way, increasing the absolute humidity after a temperature drop brings the dew point back down to its initial level. If the temperature rises in conditions of constant pressure, then the dew point will remain constant but the relative humidity will drop. For this reason, a constant relative humidity with different temperatures implies that when it's hotter, a higher fraction of the air is water vapor than when it's cooler.

— Freebase

Centrosymmetry

Centrosymmetry

The term centrosymmetric, as generally used in crystallography, refers to a point group which contains an inversion center as one of its symmetry elements. In such a point group, for every point in the unit cell there is an indistinguishable point. Crystals with an inversion center cannot display certain properties, such as the piezoelectric effect. Point groups lacking an inversion center are further divided into polar and chiral types. A chiral point group is one without any rotoinversion symmetry elements. Rotoinversion is rotation followed by inversion; for example, a mirror reflection corresponds to a twofold rotoinversion. Chiral point groups must therefore only contain rotational symmetry. These arise from the crystal point groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 222, 422, 622, 32, 23, and 432. Chiral molecules such as proteins crystallize in chiral point groups. The term polar is often used for those point groups which are neither centrosymmetric nor chiral. However, the term is more correctly used for any point group containing a unique anisotropic axis. These occur in crystal point groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, m, mm2, 3m, 4mm, and 6mm. Thus some chiral space groups are also polar.

— Freebase

Point group

Point group

In geometry, a point group is a group of geometric symmetries that keep at least one point fixed. Point groups can exist in a Euclidean space with any dimension, and every point group in dimension d is a subgroup of the orthogonal group O. Point groups can be realized as sets of orthogonal matrices M that transform point x into point y: where the origin is the fixed point. Point-group elements can either be rotations or else reflections, or improper rotations. Discrete point groups in more than one dimension come in infinite families, but from the crystallographic restriction theorem and one of Bieberbach's theorems, each number of dimensions has only a finite number of point groups that are symmetric over some lattice or grid with that number. These are the crystallographic point groups.

— Freebase

point douglas

point douglas

Nicknamed “The Point”, Point Douglas is bordered to the east by St. Boniface and Elmwood, to the south by Fort Rouge, to the north by St. Johns, and to the west by Burrows, Wellington and Minto. In the 1880s, North Point Douglas was home to many wealthy businessmen and entrepreneurs, but by the turn of century, it became more industrialized due to its proximity to the railroad. Prosperity faded as residents moved to newer North End neighbourhoods, leaving behind mostly new immigrants and poorly-paid factory workers. In 1909, two streets in North Point Douglas became known as Winnipeg’s red light district, a reputation the area has found hard to shake in the century since. Today, North Point Douglas is home to many Aborigional people; nearly 50 per cent of North Point Douglas residents identify as Métis or Native, compared with just 10 per cent in the whole of Winnipeg. Many still live in the area's original houses; most of the housing stock in the area was built before 1950. The area is also home to some of the poorest families in Winnipeg. Three-quarters of the households in the neighbourhood have an annual income of less than $40,000 -- much lower than the average household income in Winnipeg. More than half the area's residents say they didn't graduate from high school, and the unemployment rate hovers around 20 per cent. Gangs such as the Most Organized Brothers and the Manitoba Warriors are known to frequent this area. News Woman Shot in Point Douglas Drive-By Man Charged in Stabbing New Affordable Housing for Single Women in North Point Douglas Comments Point Douglas (aka PD) is a crime-ridden neighbourhood in North End. It is a very troubled community dealing with gangs, drugs, guns, and prostitution. Home to gangs such BABYGANGSTAS,NATIVE SYNDICATE,ONLY BROTHAZ ALOUD,CRAZY EIGHTZ, INDIAN POSSE,RUTHLESS POSSE,M.O.B,P.D BOYZ,POINT $IDE, and beleive me therez way moree!!!!!!!!..... LMFAO theres no way that PD has that many gangs i hear its just MOB and MWS around there now no way buddy your a dumb ass its not only mw and mob there just on Flora,Stella,Selkirk ave go to other hoods in north end you would meet up with diffrent gangs You can also call this area Neechee Land

— Rap Dictionary

Prick

Prick

prik, n. that which pricks or penetrates: a sharp point: the act or feeling of pricking: a puncture: a sting: remorse: (Shak.) a thorn, prickle, skewer, point of time: (Spens.) point, pitch.—v.t. to pierce with a prick: to erect any pointed thing: to fix by the point: to put on by puncturing: to mark or make by pricking: to incite: to deck out as with flowers or feathers: to pain.—v.i. to have a sensation of puncture: to stand erect: to ride with spurs:—pa.t. and pa.p. pricked.—adj. Prick′-eared, having pointed ears.—ns. Prick′er, that which pricks: a sharp-pointed instrument: light-horseman: a priming wire; Prick′ing; Prickle (prik′l), a little prick: a sharp point growing from the bark of a plant or from the skin of an animal.—v.t. to prick slightly.—v.i. (Spens.) to be prickly.—ns. Prick′le-back, the stickle-back; Prick′liness; Prick′ling, the act of piercing with a sharp point: (Shak.) the sensation of being pricked.—adj. prickly.—adj. Prick′ly, full of prickles.—ns. Prick′ly-heat, a severe form of the skin disease known as lichen, with itching and stinging sensations; Prick′ly-pear, a class of plants with clusters of prickles and fruit like the pear; Prick′-me-dain′ty (Scot.), an affected person.—adj. over-precise.&mdamdash;ns. Prick′-song (Shak.), a song set to music: music in parts; Prick′-spur, a goad-spur; Prick′-the-gar′ter (cf. Fast-and-loose); Prick′-the-louse (Scot.), a tailor. [A.S. pricu, a point; Ger. prickeln, Dut. prikkel, a prickle.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nie

Nie

Nie.. (this word and term is pronounced similar to the word knee, which is below the thigh of a leg..) “Nie is the acronym for Natural inspired evolvement”. Nie is the fifth manifested point of phenomena created by any two individually-created,prior points of focus, upon their working together creating a third point of an interesting focus that now can be realized with the imaginations’ three points of cooperation in height.. of width.. and of depth in imagery... and now with more acute focusing upon that subject it also inspires more Natural momentum to occur and in Its Natural essence of life enhancing,life-giving phenomenal abilities of evolution-evolving, and turning of the things of matter-that matter forwards,and towards our physical senses equally, and as “even to as we can hear” each of the emotional and physical feelings, and will and shall arise “evenly” along with “all” of the cooperative components needed.. which is now the marinating and culminating fourth point of phenomenal interest. The fifth point of interest in this Natural phenomenal is now at the “realized-state” of being ..to where it can be tested and used in its’ physical or three demential form even to the focusing of our senses,our so-called reality of life and lifes’-truths, and therefore in this type of truth is and can from now onward forwards in this universe be proven by and as equal to our five basic physical senses. This interesting fifth point of phenomenon will now be able to be tested by other interested points of interest because now every substance involved can and is now mirroring being heard,seen, tasted, touched, and smelt. Nie is the Natural “gap” within the vibration process of unscene-scenes which Gravitate alem, gravitate alem, towards eventually becoming a new individual creation of interest also with its own creative points of interest. This Nie is the “gap” that adheres rays of light causing and drawing forth a “bow of perceived-darkness”, that is therefore determined, recognized and realized as an ongoing positive “light-source”.. and NOT a *night source! .. basically because there is no darkness or source of darkness.. in this to merely meaning a person can not go into a room and cut on a “dark-switch”.. there is ONLY a “light-switch”. This fifth process of Nie can now potentially-reproduce equally among the other nies of other groups as each nie has its own potential points of interests to create anew for expansion in this universe for the good of all.

— Editors Contribution

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An antonym for the term "ductile"
  • A. intractable
  • B. malleable
  • C. fictile
  • D. pliable