Synonyms containing dig ones own grave

We've found 12,362 synonyms:

Grave goods

Grave goods

Grave goods, in archaeology and anthropology, are the items buried along with the body. They are usually personal possessions, supplies to smooth the deceased's journey into the afterlife or offerings to the gods. Grave goods are a type of votive deposit. Most grave goods recovered by archaeologists consist of inorganic objects such as pottery and stone and metal tools but there is evidence that organic objects that have since decayed were also placed in ancient tombs. Where grave goods appear, grave robbery is a potential problem. Etruscans would scratch the word śuθina, Etruscan for "from a tomb", on grave goods buried with the dead to discourage their reuse by the living. The tomb of pharaoh Tutankhamun is famous because it was one of the few Egyptian tombs that was not thoroughly looted in ancient times. Grave goods are in origin a sacrifice intended for the benefit of the deceased in the afterlife. Closely related are customs of ancestor worship and offerings to the dead, in modern western culture related to All Souls' Day, in East Asia the "hell bank note" and related customs. Also closely related is the custom of retainer sacrifice, where servants or wives of a deceased chieftain are interred with the body. As the inclusion of expensive grave goods and of slaves or retainers became a sign of high status in the Bronze Age, the prohibitive cost led to the development of "fake" grave goods or funerary art, where artwork meant to depict grave goods or retainers is produced for the burial and deposited in the grave in place of the actual sacrifice.

— Freebase

Grave

Grave

grāv, v.t. to carve or cut on a hard substance: to engrave.—v.i. to engrave:—pa.p. graved or grāv′en.n. a pit graved or dug out, esp. one in which to bury the dead: any place of burial: the abode of the dead: (fig.) death: destruction.—n.pl. Grave′-clothes, the clothes in which the dead are buried.—n. Grave′-dig′ger, one who digs graves.—adj. Grave′less (Shak.), without a grave, unburied.—ns. Grave′-mak′er (Shak.), a grave-digger; Grave′-stone, a stone laid over, or placed at the head of, a grave as a memorial; Grave′yard, a yard or enclosure used as a burial-ground.—With one foot in the grave, on the very borders of death. [A.S. grafan; Dut. graven, Ger. graben; Gr. graphein, to scratch, L. scribĕre, to write.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dig

Dig

dig, v.t. to excavate: to turn up the earth: to cultivate with a spade: to poke or thrust, as one's elbow into another's side, or spurs into a horse.—v.i. to till the ground; to occupy one's self in digging; (U.S. slang) to study hard:—pr.p. dig′ging; pa.t. and pa.p. dug, (B.) digged.—n. a thrust, a poke: (U.S. slang) a hard student.—adj. Dig′gable, that may be dug.—n. Dig′ger, a person or animal that digs: a machine for digging, as a steam-digger.—n.pl. Dig′gings, places where mining is carried on, esp. for gold: (slang, orig. American) lodgings, rooms.—Dig in, to cover over by digging: to work hard; Dig out (U.S. slang), to decamp.—Digger Indians, degraded Indian tribes of California and Nevada, who live by digging roots. [Prob. O. Fr. diguer, to dig; of Teut. origin.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Grave robbery

Grave robbery

Grave robbery, grave robbing, or tomb raiding is the act of uncovering a tomb or crypt to steal artifacts or personal effects. Someone who engages in this act is a grave robber or tomb raider. A related act is body snatching, disinterring a grave for the purpose of stealing a corpse rather than for stealing other objects. Grave robbing has caused great difficulty to the study of archaeology, art history, and history. Countless precious grave sites and tombs have been robbed before scholars were able to examine them. In any way – the archaeological context and the historical and anthropological information is destroyed. In modern times, grave robbers are often lower-income individuals. Grave robbers sell their goods on the black market. Though some artifacts may make their way to museums or scholars, many end up in private collections.

— Freebase

Double grave accent

Double grave accent

The double grave accent is a diacritic used in scholarly discussions of the Serbian, Croatian and sometimes Slovene languages. It is also used in the International Phonetic Alphabet. In Serbian, Croatian and Slovenian, double grave accent is used to indicate a short falling tone, though in discussion of Slovenian, a single grave accent is also often used for this purpose. The double grave accent is found in both Latin and Cyrillic; however, it is not used in the everyday orthography of either language, but is used only in discussions of the phonology of these languages. In the International Phonetic Alphabet, the double grave accent is used to indicate extra-low tone. The letters a e i o r u and their Cyrillic equivalents а е и о р у can all be found with the double grave accent. Unicode provides precomposed characters for the upper- and lowercase Latin letters, but not the Cyrillic ones. The Cyrillic letters can be formed using the combining character for the double grave, which is located at U+030F. This combining character can also be used with IPA vowel symbols if necessary.

— Freebase

Digit

Digit

dij′it, n. a finger's breadth or ¾ inch: from the habit of counting on the fingers, any one of the nine numbers: the twelfth part of the diameter of the sun or moon.—adj. Dig′ital, pertaining to the fingers.—n. finger: a key of a piano, &c.—ns. Digitā&primprime;lia, Dig′italine, Dig′italin, the active principles of digitalis; Digitā′lis, a genus of plants, including the foxglove; Digitā′ria, a genus of grasses with digitate spikes.—adjs. Digitate, -d, consisting of several finger-like sections.—adv. Dig′itately.—n. Digitā′tion, finger-like arrangement: a finger-like process.—adj. Digit′iform, formed like fingers; Dig′itigrade, walking on the toes.—n. an animal that walks on its toes, as the lion—opp. to Plantigrade.—ns. Dig′itigradism; Digitō′rium, a small portable instrument used for making the fingers flexible for piano-playing. [L. digitus, a finger or toe, akin to Gr. daktylos.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Self

Self

self, n. one's own person: one's personal interest: one's own personal interest, selfishness: a flower having its colour uniform as opposed to variegated:—pl. Selves (selvz).—adj. very: particular: one's own: simple, plain, unmixed with any other.—ns. Self′-aban′donment, disregard of self; Self′-abase′ment, abasement through consciousness of unworthiness.—adj. Self′-absorbed′, absorbed in one's own thoughts.—ns. Self′-abuse′, the abuse of one's own person or powers: self-pollution; Self′-accusā′tion, the act of accusing one's self.—adjs. Self′-accus′atory; Self′-act′ing, acting of, or by, itself, specially denoting a machine or mechanism which does of itself something that is ordinarily done by manual labour.—n. Self′-activ′ity, an inherent power of acting.—adj. Self′-adjust′ing, requiring no external adjustment.—n. Self′-admis′sion (Shak.), admission of one's self.—n.pl. Self′-affairs′ (Shak.), one's own affairs.—adjs. Self′-affect′ed (Shak.), affected well towards one's self; Self′-affright′ed (Shak.), frightened at one's self.—n. Self′-applause′, applause of one's self.—adjs. Self′-appoint′ed, nominated by one's self; Self′-approv′ing, implying approval of one's own conduct; Self′-assert′ing, given to asserting one's opinion: putting one's self forward.—n. Self′-asser′tion.—adj. Self′-assumed′, assumed by one's own act.—n. Self′-assump′tion, conceit.—adj. Self′-begot′ten, generated or originated by one's own powers.—n. Self′-bind′er, the automatic binding apparatus attached to some reaping-machines.—adj. Self′-blind′ed, led astray by one's self.—n. Self′-blood′ (obs.), direct progeny: suicide.—adj. Self′-born′, born or produced by one's self.—n. Self′-boun′ty (Shak.), native goodness.—adj. Self′-cen′tred, centred in self.—n. Self′-char′ity (Shak.), love of one's self.—adjs. Self′-clō′sing, shutting automatically; Self′-collect′ed, self-possessed: self-contained; Self′-col′oured, of the natural colour: dyed in the wool: coloured with a single tint: (hort.) uniform in colour.—ns. Self′-command′, self-control; Self′-complā′cency, satisfaction with one's self, or with one's own performances.—adj.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ship burial

Ship burial

A ship burial or boat grave is a burial in which a ship or boat is used either as a container for the dead and the grave goods, or as a part of the grave goods itself. If the ship is very small, it is called a boat grave. This style of burial was used among the Germanic peoples, particularly by Viking Age Norsemen. According to the Boxer Codex, ship burials were also practiced by the indigenous peoples of the Philippines. A unique eyewitness account of a 10th-century ship burial among the Volga Vikings is given by Arab traveller Ibn Fadlan. The largest Viking ship grave, 65 feet (20 m) long, was discovered in Norway by archeologists in 2018, and it is estimated to have been covered over 1000 years ago to be used as a boat grave for an imminent Viking king or queen.

— Wikipedia

Gravedigger

Gravedigger

A gravedigger is a cemetery worker responsible for digging a grave prior to a funeral service. If the grave is in a cemetery on the property of a church or other religious organization, gravediggers may be members of the decedent's family or volunteer parishioners. Digging graves has also been one of the traditional duties of a church's sexton. In municipal and privately owned cemeteries, gravediggers may be low-paid, unskilled, and temporary laborers, or they may be well-paid, trained, and professional careerists, as their duties may include landscaping tasks and courteous interactions with mourners and other visitors. A gravedigger implements a variety of tools to accomplish his primary task. A template, in the form of a wooden frame built to prescribed specifications, is often placed on the ground over the intended grave. The gravedigger may use a sod-cutter or spade to cut the outline of the grave and remove the top layer of sod. Digging the grave by hand usually requires shovels, picks, mattocks, and/or other tools. Cemeteries in industrialized countries may keep a backhoe loader and other heavy equipment, which greatly increases the efficiency of gravedigging.

— Freebase

Interment.net

Interment.net

Interment.net is a website containing a free on-line database of transcriptions from grave markers, intended to be a research tool for use by genealogists and historians. As of 2006, the site was one of the top 15 free genealogy website on the Internet. The database is limited to information transcribed from grave markers at cemeteries as well as obtained from burial records from the cemetery office. The data includes surname, given name, birth date, birthplace, death date, death place, age, inscription, notes, and sometimes the location of the grave marker. Many of the cemeteries transcribed on the site no longer exist, making the site one of the few sources for those inscriptions. The records contain no biographical information or other information which goes beyond the scope of the definition of burial records. The reason for this is that there are already other websites which provide a combination of on-line grave records and memorials. Interment.net tries to provide an on-line tool that is more useful to researchers by limiting the information in the records to what is actually inscribed on the grave markers.

— Freebase

Dignify

Dignify

dig′ni-fī, v.t. to invest with honour: to exalt:—pr.p. dig′nifying; pa.p. dig′nified.—n. Dignificā′tion.—adj. Dig′nified, marked with dignity: exalted: noble: grave. [Low L. dignificāredignus, worthy, facĕre, to make.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mine

Mine

to dig a mine or pit in the earth; to get ore, metals, coal, or precious stones, out of the earth; to dig in the earth for minerals; to dig a passage or cavity under anything in order to overthrow it by explosives or otherwise

— Webster Dictionary

ovens

ovens

Are always provided in garrisons, so that the troops may bake their own bread. A large saving of flour is thus made, which is the most considerable element of the post fund. A brick oven large enough to bake 500 rations can be constructed in less than twenty-four hours. The cylindrical form is greatly to be preferred, as it is more easily made and requires less material than the ordinary forms. The want of brick for the arch and fireplace of ovens may be supplied in the field by two gabions of semicircular or semi-elliptical form. They are placed one above the other on the flat side, and form a cradle. The interior and exterior is plastered with clay, which must penetrate the interstices of the basket-work. The front and back parts are shut in the same manner, or with sods. The cradle is then covered with earth to retain the heat; and in order that the superincumbent weight may not cause it to give way, withes are attached to the top of the basket-work, passed vertically through the embankment, and then fastened to the longitudinal beam of a wooden horse straddled against the exterior curve. Ovens may also be made of wood or earth. To construct rapidly an earthen oven, dig a slope with a step, and on its prolongation dig the length of the oven in a trench separated from the step by a mass of earth, to be pierced later as the mouth of the oven. Then dig laterally portions of an elliptical arch so as to make the arch a given breadth. This work finished, pierce the mouth, and cover the trench with from three to five sods as arch stones, leaving a chimney-place at the bottom. Ovens for from 100 to 250 rations may be thus made. In some European armies they have very convenient portable ovens.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Kurgan

Kurgan

Kurgan is the Turkic term for a tumulus. These are mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves, originating with its use in Soviet archaeology, now widely used for tumuli in the context of Eastern European and Central Asian archaeology. The word kurgan ‘funerary mound’, is, as well as Central Asia and Anatolia used in Russia and Ukraine, but throughout South-Eastern Europe, from Tatar, Tat., Osm., Kum. kurgan, Old Turkic kurgan "fortification", Kirg. and Jagat. korgan, Karakirg. korgon, all from Turkotat. kurgamak "fortify", kurmak "erect". The distribution of such tumuli in Eastern Europe corresponds closely to the area of the Pit Grave or Kurgan culture in South-Eastern Europe. Kurgans were built in the Eneolithic, Bronze, Iron, Antiquity and Middle Ages, with old traditions still active in Southern Siberia and Central Asia. Kurgan cultures are divided archeologically into different sub-cultures, such as Timber Grave, Pit Grave, Scythian, Sarmatian, Hunnish and Kuman-Kipchak. A plethora of placenames that include the word "kurgan" appear from Lake Baikal to the Black Sea.

— Freebase

Mass grave

Mass grave

A mass grave is a grave containing multiple number of human corpses, which may or may not be identified prior to burial. There is no strict definition of the minimum number of bodies required to constitute a mass grave, although the United Nations defines a mass grave as a burial site which contains three or more victims of execution. Mass graves are an infamous variation on common burial, still occasionally practiced today under normal circumstances. Mass or communal burial was a common practice before the development of a dependable crematory chamber by an Italian named Brunetti in 1873. In Paris, the practice of mass burial, and in particular, the condition of the infamous Cimetière des Innocents, led Louis XVI to eliminate Parisian cemeteries. The remains were removed and placed in the Paris underground forming the early Catacombs. La Cimetière des Innocents alone had 6,000,000 dead to remove. Burial commenced outside of the city limits in what is now Père Lachaise Cemetery. Mass graves are usually created after a large number of people die or are killed, and there is a desire to bury the corpses quickly for sanitation concerns. In disasters, mass graves are used for infection and disease control.

— Freebase

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A synonym for "drooping"
  • A. tense
  • B. erect
  • C. upright
  • D. sagging