Synonyms containing easily taught

We've found 4,475 synonyms:

School

School

skōōl, n. a place for instruction: an institution of learning, esp. for children: the pupils of a school: exercises for instruction: the disciples of a particular teacher, or those who hold a common doctrine: a large number of fish migrating together, a shoal: a system of training: any means of knowledge, esp. (mus.) a treatise teaching some particular branch of the art: a large hall in English universities, where the examinations for degrees, &c., are held—hence, one of these examinations (gen. pl.) also the group of studies taken by a man competing for honours in these: a single department of a university: (pl.) the body of masters and students in a college.—v.t. to educate in a school: to instruct: to admonish, to discipline.—adj. School′able, of school age.—ns. School′-board, a board of managers, elected by the ratepayers, whose duty it is to see that adequate means of education are provided for the children of a town or district; School′-boy, a boy attending a school: one learning the rudiments of a subject; School′-clerk, one versed in the learning of schools; School′-craft, learning; School′-dame, a schoolmistress.—n.pl. School′-days, the time of life during which one goes to school.—ns. School′-divine′; School′-divin′ity, scholastic or seminary theology; School′-doc′tor, a schoolman; School′ery (Spens.), something taught, precepts; School′-fell′ow, one taught at the same school: an associate at school; School′girl a girl attending school.—n.pl. School′-hours, time spent at school in acquiring instruction.—ns. School′-house, a house of discipline and instruction: a house used as a school: a schoolmaster's house; School′ing, instruction in school: tuition: the price paid for instruction: reproof, reprimand; School′-inspec′tor, an official appointed to examine schools; School′-ma'am, a schoolmistress; School′-maid, a school-girl; School′man, one of the philosophers and theologians of the second half of the middle ages; School′master, the master or teacher of a school, a pedagogue:—fem. School′mistress, a woman who teaches or who merely governs a school; School′-mate, one who attends the same school; School′-name, an abstract term, an abstraction; School′-pence, a small sum paid for school-teaching; School′-point, a point for scholastic disputation; School′-room, a room for teaching in: school accommodation; School′-ship, a vessel used for teaching practical navigation.—adj. School′-taught, taught at school or in the schools.—ns. School′-teach′er, one who teaches in a school; School′-teach′ing; School′-time, the time at which a school op

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Open University

Open University

A UK university offering distance learning taught courses, that are open to people without formal academic qualifications, teaching being by correspondence and online with mostly optional tutorials and for some courses compulsory summer schools. Access to postgraduate research is selective and is primarily taught on campus using traditional methods.

— Wiktionary

Lesson

Lesson

A lesson is a structured period of time where learning is intended to occur. It involves one or more students being taught by a teacher or instructor. A lesson may be either one section of a textbook or, more frequently, a short period of time during which learners are taught about a particular subject or taught how to perform a particular activity. Lessons are generally taught in a classroom but may instead take place in a situated learning environment. In a wider sense, a lesson is an insight gained by a learner into previously unfamiliar subject-matter. Such a lesson can be either planned or accidental, enjoyable or painful. The colloquial phrase "to teach someone a lesson", means to punish or scold a person for a mistake they have made in order to ensure that they do not make the same mistake again. Lessons can also be made entertaining. When the term education is combined with entertainment, the term edutainment is coined.

— Freebase

Pliable

Pliable

plī′a-bl, adj. easily bent or folded: supple: easily persuaded: yielding to influence.—ns. Pliabil′ity, Plī′ableness, quality of being pliable or flexible.—adv. Plī′ably, in a pliable manner.—ns. Plī′ancy, Plī′antness, the state of being pliant: readiness to be influenced.—adj. Plī′ant, bending easily: flexible: tractable: easily influenced.—adv. Plī′antly. [Fr. pliable—L. plicāre, to fold.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tumed

Tumed

The Tümed (Tumad, "The many or ten thousands" derived from Tumen) are a Mongol subgroup. They live in Tumed Left Banner, district of Hohhot and Tumed Right Banner, district of Baotou in China. Most engage in sedentary agriculture, living in mixed communities in the suburbs of Huhhot. Part of them live along Hulun Buir, Inner Mongolia. There are the Tumeds in the soums of Mandal-Ovoo, Bulgan, Tsogt-Ovoo, Tsogttsetsii, Manlai, Khurmen, Bayandalai and Sevrei of Umnugovi Aimag, Mongolia. At the beginning of the 9th – 13th Centuries, the Khori-Tumed lived near the western side of Lake Baikal. They lived southern Irkutsk Oblast, some part of Tuva and southwestern Buryatia. In 1207, Genghis Khan, after conquering the Khori-Tumed, decided to move some of these groups south and these people eventually settled in the southern parts of the Great Gobi. But it seems that the Tumed people had no strong connection with those forest people in Siberia. The Tumeds first appeared as the tribe of the Mongolian warlord Dogolon taishi in the mid-15th century. In Mongolian chronicles, they were called seven Tumeds or twelve Tumeds. Because the Kharchin and other Mongol clans joined their league, they were probably called 12 Tumeds later. Under Dayan Khan (1464-1517/1543) and his successors, the Tumeds formed right wing of the eastern Mongols. The Tumeds reached their peak under the rule of Altan Khan (1507–1582) in the mid-16th century. They raided the Ming dynasty and attacked the Four Oirats. The Tumeds under Altan Khan recaptured Karakorum from the hands of the Oirats but the outcome of the war was not decisive in the 16th century. They are also famous for being the first of the Mongol tribes converted to Buddhism. They submitted to the Qing dynasty and allied against the Chahar Mongols in the early 17th century. They were included in Josotu league of the Qing. The Tumed were Sinicized linguistically in the late 19th century, and by the early 20th century. Many of their leaders rose to the very top government, party, and military positions in the newly rounded IMAR, and some attained leading national posts in Beijing and elsewhere. Ulanhu (1906–1988), a Tumed Mongol born near Huhhot, the capital of Inner Mongolia, who dominated the politics of the region until his death in 1989, and was the highest-ranking Mongol in the Communist Party of China. After the 1920s, as the Tumed began to interact with other Mongols, they began to feel an acute sense of inadequacy regarding their Mongolian language skills. In the 1950s, they set up many nationality (minzu) primary schools and middle schools that recruited only Mongolian students. In these schools, Mongolian was taught as a subject, one considered of equal importance to Chinese, though all other subjects were taught in Chinese. During the Cultural Revolution years, 1966–76, Mongolian instruction was largely abolished. A new attempt to provide a Mongol education began in September 1979. The Tumed banner built a "Mongolian Nationality Primary School" in October 1982 in the banner center. The school then had eight classes divided into three grades, with 201 boarding pupils, all taught in Mongolian. Chinese was taught only from grade 5, the students were not allowed to leave the compound without permission, and, during vacations, they were often sent to the grassland to learn directly from pure Mongol-speaking herders, lest they be contaminated by their Chinese-speaking parents and relatives or Chinese neighbors.

— Wikipedia

tractable

tractable

Capable of being easily led, taught, or managed; docile; manageable; governable.

— Wiktionary

Swedenborgian

Swedenborgian

one who holds the doctrines of the New Jerusalem church, as taught by Emanuel Swedenborg, a Swedish philosopher and religious writer, who was born a. d. 1688 and died 1772. Swedenborg claimed to have intercourse with the spiritual world, through the opening of his spiritual senses in 1745. He taught that the Lord Jesus Christ, as comprehending in himself all the fullness of the Godhead, is the one only God, and that there is a spiritual sense to the Scriptures, which he (Swedenborg) was able to reveal, because he saw the correspondence between natural and spiritual things

— Webster Dictionary

manipulable

tractable, manipulable

easily managed (controlled or taught or molded)

— Princeton's WordNet

tractable

tractable, manipulable

easily managed (controlled or taught or molded)

— Princeton's WordNet

Docible

Docible

easily taught or managed; teachable

— Webster Dictionary

Docile

Docile

disposed to be taught; tractable; easily managed; as, a docile child

— Webster Dictionary

Indocible

Indocible

incapable of being taught, or not easily instructed; dull in intellect; intractable; unteachable; indocile

— Webster Dictionary

Indocile

Indocile

not teachable; indisposed to be taught, trained, or disciplined; not easily instructed or governed; dull; intractable

— Webster Dictionary

Intractable

Intractable

not tractable; not easily governed, managed, or directed; indisposed to be taught, disciplined, or tamed; violent; stubborn; obstinate; refractory; as, an intractable child

— Webster Dictionary

Tractable

Tractable

capable of being easily led, taught, or managed; docile; manageable; governable; as, tractable children; a tractable learner

— Webster Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "miserable"?
  • A. misfortunate
  • B. pathetic
  • C. comfy
  • D. measly