Synonyms containing engine-room telegraph

We've found 5,813 synonyms:

Room number

Room number

A room number is a number assigned to a room within a building. Its purpose is to identify a particular room, and help building inhabitants locate that room. Logical and consistent assignment of room numbers is important for efficient everyday building usage, and to allow emergency personnel to quickly and easily find their way to any area of a building. Room numbers may consist of three digits, but can be any number of digits. The room number is generally assigned with the first digit indicating the floor on which the room is located. For example, room 412 would be on the fourth floor of the building; room 540 would be on the fifth floor. Buildings that have more than nine floors will have four digits assigned to rooms beyond the ninth floor. For example, room 1412 would be on the 14th floor. The second digit may represent the wing, or section, of the building in which the room is located: room 540 will typically be found adjacent to room 542, and room 532 adjacent to room 530. In a four digit room number, this digit will be the third digit instead of the second. The third digit is often assigned based on the side of the corridor on which the room is located: one side of the corridor has odd-numbered rooms and the opposite side has even-numbered rooms. However, numbers may also proceed in an ascending manner on one side of the corridor before switching to the opposite side to continue doing so on that side. In four digit room numbers, this digit will be represented by the fourth digit instead of the third. Where a room is subdivided, the rooms which are accessed after entry into the primary room number are denoted by appending a letter suffix to the next room: for example, after entering room 412 doors which lead to other rooms from within room 412 will be labeled 412A, 412B, and so on. This is known as the Parent-Child Room Numbering system. The room which is entered first is known as the Parent Room. Rooms accessed after first passing through the Parent Room are Child Rooms. A letter may appear before the numbers to indicate a particular building or wing. For example, Room D149 is a room in D building. An offset may be used to accommodate unnumbered floors. For example, in a building with floors labeled G, M, 1, 2, ..., 11 and 12, the 4th room in each of those floors could be numbered 104, 114, 124, 134, ..., 224, and 234, respectively — with an offset of 11 in the floor numbers. This trick is sometimes used to make the floor number slightly less obvious, e.g. for security or marketing reasons.

— Wikipedia

Flooded engine

Flooded engine

A flooded engine is an internal combustion engine that has been fed an excessively rich air-fuel mixture that cannot be ignited. This is caused by the mixture exceeding the upper explosive limit for the particular fuel. An engine in this condition will not start until the excessively rich mixture has been cleared. It is also possible for an engine to stall from a running state due to this condition. Engine flooding was a common problem with carbureted cars, but newer fuel-injected ones are immune to the problem when operating within normal tolerances. Flooding usually occurs during starting, especially under cold conditions or because the accelerator has been pumped. It can also occur during hot starting; high temperatures may cause fuel in the carburetor float chamber to evaporate into the inlet manifold, causing the air/fuel mixture to exceed the upper explosive limit. High temperature fuel may also result in a vapor lock, which is unrelated to flooding but has a similar symptom. A severe form of engine flooding occurs when excessive liquid fuel enters the combustion chamber. This reduces the dead volume of the combustion chamber and thus places a heavy load on the starter motor, such that it fails to turn the engine. Damage (due to excessive compression and even dilution of the lubricating oil with fuel) can also occur. This condition is known as the engine "flooding out." Possible causes of too much liquid fuel in the engine include a defective carburetor float that is not closing the fuel inlet needle valve, or debris caught in the needle valve preventing it from sealing. Liquids inside an internal combustion engine are extremely detrimental because of the incompressibility of liquids. Although not the most common cause, a severely flooded engine could result in a hydrolock. A hydrolock occurs when a liquid fills a combustion chamber to the point that it is impossible to turn the crankshaft without a catastrophic failure of the engine or one of its vital components. The conventional remedy for a flooded carbureted engine is to steadily hold the throttle full open (full power position) while continuing to crank the engine. This permits the maximum flow of air through the engine, flushing the overly rich fuel mixture out of the exhaust. If the exhaust system is hot enough to autoignite, an after-fire may result; this can be seen as a flame discharging through the exhaust system. On a fuel-injected engine, ignoring the throttle (no fuel) while starting permits electronic logic systems to produce the correct fuel mixture, often based on exhaust gases. Some fuel injection computers interpret 'pumping' the throttle to indicate a flooded engine, and alter the fuel-air mixture accordingly. In a carbureted engine equipped with an accelerator pump (which advances fuel flow to match air ingestion under rapid throttle acceleration), 'pumping' the throttle will force excess fuel into the engine, further flooding it. In worst cases, the excess fuel can foul spark plugs, sometimes necessitating their cleaning or replacement before the engine will start. This is most likely to occur on a carbureted engine in cold weather, after a running engine has been shut off briefly before being restarted. Doing so can cause the choke to configure the mixture for a cold engine start, despite higher actual temperatures, resulting in an overly rich mixture and flooded engine.

— Wikipedia

Engine room

Engine room

On a ship, the engine room, or ER, is the propulsion machinery spaces of the vessel. To increase the safety and damage survivability of a vessel, the machinery necessary for operations may be segregated into various spaces. The engine room is one of these spaces, and is generally the largest physical compartment of the machinery space. The engine room houses the vessel's prime mover, usually some variations of a heat engine - diesel engine, gas or steam turbine. On some ships, the machinery space may comprise more than one engine room, such as forward and aft, or port or starboard engine rooms, or may be simply numbered. On a large percentage of vessels, ships and boats, the engine room is located near the bottom, and at the rear, or aft, end of the vessel, and usually comprises few compartments. This design maximizes the cargo carrying capacity of the vessel and situates the prime mover close to the propeller, minimizing equipment cost and problems posed from long shaft lines. The engine room on some ships may be situated mid-ship, especially on vessels built from 1900 to the 1960s. With the increased use of diesel electric propulsion packages, the engine room may be located well forward, low or high on the vessel, depending on the vessel use.

— Freebase

Room

Room

rōōm, n. space: a chamber: extent of place: space unoccupied: freedom to act: fit occasion: place of another: stead: (B.) a seat: a particular place: a box in a theatre: office: the inner room of a cottage: a garret.—v.i. to occupy a room, to lodge.—adv. (naut.) off from the wind.—n. Room′age, capacity.—adj. Roomed, containing rooms.—ns. Room′er, a lodger; Room′ful, as much or as many as a room will hold.—adv. Room′ily.—n. Room′iness.—adsj. Room′-rid′den, confined to one's room; Room′some, roomy.—adv. Room′y, having ample room: wide: spacious.—Give room, to withdraw so as to leave space for others; Make room, to open a way. [A.S. rúm; Ger. raum, Dut. ruim.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Donkeyman

Donkeyman

This story was narrated to me by a friend of mine. We had both been to sea in the Merchant Navy many years ago. How the Donkeyman went to sea. In the days of sail, cargo was worked in port by rigging the lower yards in much the same way as derricks were rigged once yards became a thing of the past. The runner was led through blocks onto the dockside and attached to team of donkeys which were walked up or walked back, by the Donkeyman to hoist the sling or lower it. With the advent of steam power the donkeys were quickly replaced with the steam engine harness to a donkey boiler, but the chap who tended he boiler was still referred as a donkeyman. It didn't take overly long for some bright individual to suggest that the boiler would be of more use if it was on the deck of the ship instead of the dockside. This was especially advantageous yet to catch up with this new technology. An added advantage for the ship owner was that the steam power generated could be used for sail, handling winches and for heaving up the anchor etc; thus saving money by cutting the number of hands required for the ship at sea. The only downside was the cargo carrying capacity lost to the coal needed to feed the boiler. Eventually the boiler and steam engine replaced sail as the main means of propulsion on all ships. Ships which were crewed only by sailors now had a black gang down below to feed the hungry boilers and their boss was the donkeyman. Steam gave way to the Diesel engine and engine room manning was greatly reduced. No longer was their any need for gangs of firemen and trimmers, only a handful of greasers, wipers, or motormen inhabitated the engine room to assist, the engineers but the senior engine room rating was still called the Donkeyman. It is still the case? One wonders.

— Editors Contribution

Weslake

Weslake

Weslake Research and Development was founded by Harry Weslake, with premises in Rye, East Sussex, England. Weslake was a cylinder head specialist who had been instrumental in modifying the side valve standard engine used in the first SS (Swallow Sidecars - later to become Jaguar) sports car. He also worked on the larger SS engine: "The 2½-litre car has an o.h.v. power-unit with Weslake combustion chambers, and gives over 40 b.h.p. per litre." He also designed the cylinder head for the overhead valve version of the Austin 'A' series engine that was used in the Morris 1000 and the Mini and received royalties on each of these engines manufactured. He was involved in the cylinder head air flow porting design of the Jaguar XK engine. Weslake was also involved in the development of the Rolls-Royce Merlin engine.In 1966 Dan Gurney commissioned Weslake Engineering to build an Aubrey Woods designed 3.0-litre V12 Formula One engine for his Eagle Mk1. Their efforts produced a V12 that was smooth and powerful. At Monza, an insight into the future of engine design was seen for the first time. The engine had four valves per cylinder at a narrow included angle (thirty degrees) that allowed a single cover to enclose both the close-spaced camshafts on each bank. The sixty-degree-vee layout had a larger bore than stroke (72.8 × 60 mm). Gurney won the Race of Champions at Brands Hatch, a non-championship event, and the 1967 Belgian Grand Prix with the Eagle-Weslake V12 engine. At Monza in 1966, 364 bhp (271 kW) was available. This increased to 390 bhp (290 kW) during the winter. At the 1967 Brands Hatch Race of Champions, Dan Gurney's engine gave 413 bhp (308 kW) and Richie Ginther's engine gave 409 bhp (305 kW). On test, up to 422 bhp (315 kW) had been achieved. At Monaco, Gurney had 411 bhp (306 kW), Ginther 417 bhp (311 kW). Later in the 1967 season quotes of 416 bhp (310 kW) were made. (These are figures from Motoring News.) The engines peaked at around 10,000 rpm. A figure of 442 bhp (330 kW) was mentioned at the start of 1968, but after money ran out, a test made at the B.R.M. factory recorded only 378 bhp (this may have been a 'tired' engine). Harry Weslake had an eventual goal of 500 bhp (370 kW) @ 12,000 rpm. Later Ford sponsored (75.0 × 56.25 mm) versions in 1972 were quoted at 465 bhp (347 kW) @ 10,500 rpm. Harry Weslake and his company provided the Gurney-Weslake cylinder heads for the engines that powered the Gulf-Wyer Ford GT40 Mk.I to two consecutive wins at Le Mans, in 1968 and 1969. During the 1970s, Weslake manufactured the Cologne RS2600 engine that Ford fitted to the Capri. This also included the special Weslake aluminium heads used for Ford's touring car challenge. The Weslake Ford Capri went on to win its class at Le Mans in 1972 and won all but one round of the European Touring car championship outright in the same year. Weslake Engineering went on to design a series of successful motorcycle engines during the 1970s that were also used in early shifter karts. Peter Collins of Belle Vue Aces and England won the 1976 Speedway World Final on a Weslake bike. Bruce Penhall rode a Weslake speedway motorcycle to many successes in the early 1980s, including two World Individual Speedway Championships. Harry Weslake was awarded the Segrave Medal in 1976 for his part in developing the four-stroke speedway engine.Harry Weslake died in 1978.

— Wikipedia

room

room

A name given to some reserved apartment in a ship, as--The bread-room. In the aftermost part of the hold: properly lined to receive the bread, and keep it dry.--The cook-room. (See GALLEY.)--The gun-room. On the after gun-deck of ships of the line, or steerage of frigates; devoted to the gun-room officers.--Light-room. Attached to the magazine.--Sail-rooms, devoted to the sails, are on the orlop deck, and are inclosed for the reception of the spare sails.--Slop-room. Devoted to slop-clothing.--Spirit-room. A secure space in the after-part of a ship's hold, for the stores of wine, brandy, &c.--Steward's-room. The office devoted to the purser's steward of former times, now paymaster's steward, whence he issues most of the light provisions to the ship's company.--Ward-room. A room over the gun-room in ships of the line, where the lieutenants and other principal officers sleep and mess. The term sea-room is applied when a ship obtains a good offing, is clear of the coast dangers, and is free to stand on a long course without nearing danger.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Semaphore line

Semaphore line

A semaphore telegraph, optical telegraph, shutter telegraph chain, Chappe telegraph, or Napoleonic semaphore is a system of conveying information by means of visual signals, using towers with pivoting shutters, also known as blades or paddles. Information is encoded by the position of the mechanical elements; it is read when the shutter is in a fixed position. The system was invented in 1792 in France by Claude Chappe, and was popular in the late 18th to early 19th century. Semaphore lines were a precursor of the electrical telegraph. They were far faster than post riders for bringing a message over long distances, but far more expensive and less private than the electrical telegraph lines which would replace them. The distance that an optical telegraph can bridge is limited by geography and weather; thus, in practical use, most optical telegraphs used lines of relay stations to bridge longer distances. Modern derivatives of the semaphore system include flag semaphore and the heliograph.

— Freebase

Telegraph

Telegraph

tel′e-graf, n. an apparatus for transmitting intelligible messages to a distance, esp. by means of electricity.—v.t. to convey or announce by telegraph.—ns. Tel′egraph-cā′ble, a cable containing wires for transmitting telegraphic messages; Tel′egrapher (or tē-leg′-), Tel′egraphist (or tē-leg′-), one who works a telegraph.—adjs. Telegraph′ic, -al, pertaining to, or communicated by, a telegraph.—adv. Telegraph′ically, in a telegraphic manner: by means of the telegraph.—ns. Tel′egraph-plant, an Indian leguminous plant, the small lateral leaflets of whose trifoliate leaves have a strange, spontaneous motion, jerking up and down (sometimes 180 times in a minute), as if signalling, and also rotate on their axes; Tel′egraphy (or tē-leg′-), the science or art of constructing or using telegraphs. [Gr. tēle at a distance, graphein to write.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Family room

Family room

A family room is an informal, all-purpose room in a house similar to a living room. The family room is designed to be a place where family and guests gather for group recreation like talking, reading, watching TV, and other family activities. Often, the family room is located adjacent to the kitchen, and at times, flows into it with no visual breaks. A family room often has doors leading to the back yard and specific outdoor living areas such as a deck, garden, or terrace. The term "family room" was introduced in the 1945 book Tomorrow's House by George Nelson and Henry Wright. Chapter 7, entitled "The Room Without a Name" spoke of the need in modern life for a new "biggest room in the house" that would serve the social and recreational needs of the entire family, allowing activities that would not be permitted in the living room. This "big room" would have furnishings and materials that were "tough", for hard use, and it should be easy to clean. In contrast with the existing "rumpus rooms" of the time, it would occasionally serve for slightly more formal entertainment, so it should be a handsome room and should have cupboards where toys, tools, etc. could be kept out of sight. At the end of the chapter they conclude that "we should simply call it the 'family room.'"

— Freebase

Blue Room

Blue Room

The Blue Room is one of three state parlors on the first floor in the White House, the residence of the President of the United States. It is distinct for its oval shape. The room is used for receptions and receiving lines, and is occasionally set for small dinners. President Grover Cleveland married Frances Folsom in the room on June 2, 1886, the only wedding of a President and First Lady in the White House. The room is traditionally decorated in shades of blue. With the Yellow Oval Room above it and the Diplomatic Reception Room below it, the Blue Room is one of three oval rooms in James Hoban's original design for the White House. The room is approximately 30 by 40 feet. It has six doors, which open into the Cross Hall, Green Room, Red Room, and South Portico. The three windows look out upon the South Lawn. The Blue Room is furnished in the French Empire style. A series of redecoratings through the 19th century caused most of the original pieces to be sold or lost. Today much of the furniture is original to the room. Eight pieces of gilded European beech furniture purchased during the administration of James Monroe furnish the room, including a bergère and several fauteuils. The suite of furniture was produced in Paris around 1812 by the cabinetmaker Pierre-Antoine Bellangé, and reproduction side chairs and armchairs were made by Maison Jansen in 1961 during the Kennedy restoration. A marble-top center table has been in the White House since it was purchased by Monroe in 1817. A c. 1817 ormolu French Empire mantel clock with a figure of Hannibal, by Deniére et Matelin, sits on the mantel.

— Freebase

Escape the room

Escape the room

Escape the room, also known as room escape or escape game, is a subgenre of point-and-click adventure game which requires a player to escape from imprisonment by exploiting their surroundings. The room usually consists of a locked door, objects to manipulate, and hidden clues or secret compartments. The player must use the objects to interact with other items in the room to reveal a way to escape. Escape the room games bore out of freeware browser games created in Adobe Flash, but have since become most popular as mobile games for iOS, and Android. Some examples include "Crimson Room", "Viridian Room", "MOTAS", and "Droom". The popularity of these online games has led to the development of real-life escape rooms all around the world. Elements of escape the room games can be found in other adventure games, such as such as Myst and Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors, where a complete puzzle is solved by evaluating the elements within a single room. Games like The Room may also present virtual puzzle boxes that are solved in a similar manner to escape games, by finding out how to open the puzzle box using visual clues on the box and around the environment.

— Wikipedia

Map Room

Map Room

The Map Room is a room on the ground floor of the White House, the official home of the President of the United States. The Map Room takes its name from its use during World War II, when Franklin Roosevelt used it as a situation room where maps were consulted to track the war's progress. The room was originally finished as part of the extensive renovation of the White House designed by the architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White in the administration of Theodore Roosevelt; the former basement billiard room was made into a formal space. In the Truman reconstruction of the White House, the room was paneled in the late Georgian style with wood sawn from the 1816 load-bearing timbers of the house. In the Kennedy administration the room was used by the newly created Curator of the White House as an office, used to catalog donations of furniture and objects. Under the leadership of First Lady Pat Nixon, working with Curator Clement Conger, the room underwent a major redecoration in 1970, transforming it from an office to the parlor which remains today. The room was redecorated again in 1994. The Map Room is furnished in the style of English cabinetmaker Thomas Chippendale and includes two stuffed-back armchairs that may have been built by Philadelphia cabinetmaker Thomas Affleck. Today the room is used for television interviews, small teas, and social gatherings.

— Freebase

Still room

Still room

The still room is a distillery room found in most great houses, castles or large establishments throughout Europe dating back at least to medieval times. The lady of the house was in charge of the room, where medicines were prepared, cosmetics and many home cleaning products created, and home-brewed beer or wine was often made. Herbs from the kitchen garden and surrounding countryside were processed into what today we call essential oils, and infused or distilled, or brewed as required to make rose water, lavender water, peppermint based ointments, soaps, furniture polishes and a wide variety of medicines. It was a working room: part science lab, part infirmary and part kitchen. In later years, as doctors & apothecaries became more widely spread and the products of the still room became commercially available, the still room became increasingly an adjunct of the kitchen. The use of still room devolved to making only jams, jellies, home-brewed beverages and as a store room for perishables such as cakes. Originally, the still room was a very important part of the household, run by the lady of the house, and used to teach her daughters and wards some of the skills needed to run their own homes in order to make them more marriageable by having those skills. As practical skills fell out fashion for high born women, the still room became the province first of poor dependent relations, then of housekeepers or cooks. The still room was later staffed by the still room maid.

— Freebase

Wankel engine

Wankel engine

The Wankel engine is a type of internal combustion engine using an eccentric rotary design to convert pressure into rotating motion. All parts rotate consistently in one direction, as opposed to the common reciprocating piston engine, which has pistons instantly and rapidly changing direction 180 degrees. In contrast to the more common reciprocating piston designs, the Wankel engine delivers advantages of simplicity, smoothness, compactness, high revolutions per minute, and a high power-to-weight ratio. This is primarily because there are three power pulses per rotor revolution. In a two-stroke piston engine there is one power pulse per crankshaft revolution, with one in two revolutions in a four-stroke piston engine. Although at the actual output shaft of a rotary engine, there is only one power pulse per revolution, since the output shaft spins three times as fast as the actual rotor, as can be seen in the animation below, it makes it roughly equivalent to a two-stroke piston engine of the same displacement. This is also why the displacement only measures one face of the rotor, since only one face is working for each output shaft revolution. The engine is commonly referred to as a rotary engine, although this name also applies to other completely different designs, primarily aircraft engines with their cylinders arranged in a circular fashion around the crankshaft. The four-stage cycle of intake, compression, ignition, and exhaust occur each revolution at each of the three rotor tips moving inside the oval-like epitrochoid-shaped housing, enabling the three power pulses per rotor revolution. The rotor is similar in shape to a Reuleaux triangle with the sides somewhat flatter.

— Wikipedia

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An antonym for "pesky"
  • A. pestilent
  • B. pettish
  • C. plaguey
  • D. agreeable