Synonyms containing engineer corps

We've found 1,681 synonyms:

Engine

Engine

en′jin, n. a complex and powerful machine, esp. a prime mover: a military machine: anything used to effect a purpose: a device: contrivance: (obs.) ability, genius.—v.t. to contrive: to put into action.—ns. En′gine-driv′er, one who manages an engine, esp. who drives a locomotive; Engineer, an engine maker or manager: one who directs works and engines: a soldier belonging to the division of the army called Engineers, consisting of men trained to engineering work.—v.i. to act as an engineer.—v.t. to arrange, contrive.—ns. Engineer′ing, the art or profession of an engineer; En′gine-man, one who drives an engine; En′gine-room, the room in a vessel in which the engines are placed; En′ginery, the art or business of managing engines: engines collectively: machinery; En′gine-turn′ing, a kind of ornament made by a rose-engine, as on the backs of watches, &c.—Civil engineer (see Civil). [O. Fr. engin—L. ingenium, skill. See Ingenious.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Veterinary Service, Military

Veterinary Service, Military

A corps of the armed services concerned with animal medicine, the chief interest of which is the care of government-owned working dogs (as in the military police units), working horses (as in state funerals), and working military dolphins (as in undersea exploration and other activities). In the United States Army Veterinary Corps animal medicine overlaps and interconnects with biomedical research using laboratory research animals. A related activity is laboratory animal care. The Corps provides limited care for privately owned animals of military personnel through non-appropriated funds. Military service veterinarians in the United States Army must be graduates of accredited veterinary schools and must have a state license. (Telephone communication with Lt. Col. William Inskeep II, U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, October 4, 1994)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Corps

Corps

kōr, n. a division of an army forming a tactical unit—usually Corps d'armée, or army corps:—pl. Corps (kōrz).—Corps de ballet, the company of ballet dancers at a theatre; Corps de garde, the body of soldiers stationed on guard, their station, a guard-house; Corps diplomatique, the whole diplomatic staff at a particular capital. [Fr., from L. corpus.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Public Health Service Commissioned Corps

Public Health Service Commissioned Corps

The Public Health Service Commissioned Corps is the uniformed service of the Public Health Service and organized under the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHS Corps) is one of the seven United States Uniformed Services. The Surgeon General of the United States, a vice admiral, directs the PHS Corps, which provides licensed medical and health sciences professionals to the PHS, DHHS, other United States Uniformed Services and other government agencies.

— Wiktionary

Corps

Corps

A corps is either a large military formation composed of two or more divisions, or an administrative grouping of troops within an armed force with a common function such as Artillery or Signals representing an arm of service. Corps may also refer to a particular unit or a particular branch of service, such as the United States Marine Corps, the Corps of Royal Marines, the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms, or the Corps of Commissionaires. The military term was subsequently adopted for public service organizations with a paramilitary command structure, volunteer public service organizations, such as the Peace Corps, various ambulance corps, some NGOs, and other civic volunteer organizations. Due to this use of the term, it has also spread to some other civic or volunteer organizations that lack the paramilitary structure.

— Freebase

Civil

Civil

siv′il, adj. pertaining to the community: having the refinement of city-bred people: polite: commercial, not military: lay, secular, or temporal, not ecclesiastical: pertaining to the individual citizen: (law) relating to private relations amongst citizens, and such suits as arise out of these, as opposed to criminal: (theol.) naturally good, as opposed to good through regeneration.—ns. Civil′ian, a professor or student of civil law (not canon law): one engaged in civil as distinguished from military and other pursuits; Civ′ilist, one versed in civil law; Civil′ity, good-breeding: politeness.—adv. Civ′illy.—adj. Civ′il-suit′ed (Milton), sombrely clad.—n. Civ′ism, good citizenship, state of being well-affected to the government.—Civil death, the loss of all civil and legal but not natural privileges, as by outlawry: Civil engineer, one who plans rail-ways, docks, &c., as opposed to a military engineer, or to a mechanical engineer, who makes machines, &c.; Civil law, as opposed to criminal law: the law laid down by a state regarding the rights of the inhabitants; Civil list, now the expenses of the sovereign's household only; Civil list pensions, those granted by royal favour; Civil service, the paid service of the state, in so far as it is not military or naval; Civil war, a war between citizens of the same state. [L. civīliscivis.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Corps

Corps

a body of men; esp., an organized division of the military establishment; as, the marine corps; the corps of topographical engineers; specifically, an army corps

— Webster Dictionary

Engineer

Engineer

to lay out or construct, as an engineer; to perform the work of an engineer on; as, to engineer a road

— Webster Dictionary

Combat engineer

Combat engineer

A combat engineer, also called pioneer or sapper in many armies, is a soldier who performs a variety of construction and demolition tasks under combat conditions. Such tasks typically include constructing and breaching trenches, tank traps and other fortifications, bunker construction, bridge and road construction or destruction, laying or clearing land mines, and other physical work in the battlefield. More generally, the combat engineer's goals involve facilitating movement and support of friendly forces while impeding that of the enemy. Usually, a combat engineer is also trained as an infantryman, and combat engineering units often have a secondary role fighting as infantry. Beyond self-defense, combat engineers, infantry and assault troopers from armored corps units are generally the only troops that engage in the assault while dismounted. This role is limited by a lack of fire support. However combat engineers typically do have extensive antiarmor capability in their infantry fighting role, such as with antitank missiles. There are no advanced academic qualifications required to be a combat engineer. The term "engineer" is not to be confused with the term applied to Professional Engineer or Chartered Engineer

— Freebase

Sales engineering

Sales engineering

Sales engineering is a hybrid of sales and engineering that exists in industrial and commercial markets. Buying decisions in these markets are made differently than those in many consumer contexts, being based more on technical information and rational analysis and less on style, fashion, or impulse. Therefore, selling in these markets cannot depend on consumer-type sales methods alone, and instead it relies heavily on technical information and problem-solving to convince buyers that they should spend money on the seller's products or services, in order to meet a business need (that is, to satisfy a business case). A sales engineer is thus both "a salesperson that understands and can apply engineering" and "an engineer that understands how to sell engineered systems". They thus not only sell but also provide advice and support. They provide this service to various internal or external customers, and they may work for a manufacturer (servicing its industrial-account/business-to-business customers), for a distributor (which in turn services the industrial-account/business-to-business customers), or for a third party such as an engineering consultancy or a systems integrator. Sales Engineers are a critical sales team member in many companies and industries around the world. They are more than just technical experts in their respective industries. Highly successful sales engineers must build and maintain parallel expertise in "soft skill" disciplines such as business acumen, presentation skills, building customer relationships, developing an engagement strategy, and having a thorough understanding of the targeted industry. Many companies have difficulty finding people who possess these qualities, plus have extensive technical knowledge. The essence of the sales engineering role can be called by various names. Which name is most apt can even depend on which industry it is used in. Some common job titles that involve the essence of sales engineering include sales engineer, solutions engineer, solutions architect, systems engineer, customer engineer, pre-sales consultant, technical account manager, applications engineer or field applications engineer. The term systems engineering has various shades of meaning, however, as it is often more or less synonymous with industrial engineering; but in any market economy, industrial engineers will often end up providing some sales engineering as a necessary portion of their work. Service technicians in industrial fields may also find that their work challenges them to provide some sales engineering, to whatever extent they are capable of providing it, because they interface with customers having problems with equipment (or lacking the right equipment) and seeking solutions (anywhere from diagnosis and repair, to identifying entirely different systems that could be used instead).

— Wikipedia

NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps

NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps, and known informally as the NOAA Corps, is one of seven federal uniformed services of the United States and operates under the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a scientific agency within the Department of Commerce. The NOAA Corps is one of two uniformed services – the other is the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps – that consist only of commissioned officers, with no enlisted or warrant officer ranks. Established in 1970, the NOAA Corps is the successor to the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Corps and the Environmental Science Services Administration Corps.

— Freebase

Flight engineer

Flight engineer

Flight engineers work in three types of aircraft: fixed-wing, rotary wing, and space flight. As airplanes became even larger requiring more engines and complex systems to operate, the workload on the two pilots became excessive during certain critical parts of the flight regime, notably takeoffs and landings. Piston engines on airplanes required a great deal of attention throughout the flight with their multitude of gauges and indicators. Inattention or a missed indication could result in engine or propeller failure, and quite possibly cause loss of the airplane if prompt corrective action was not taken. In order to dedicate a person to monitoring the engines and other critical flight systems, the position of Flight Engineer was created. The Flight Engineer did not actually fly the airplane; instead, the Flight Engineer had his own specialized control panel allowing him to monitor and control the various aircraft systems. The Flight Engineer is therefore an integrated member of the flight deck crew who works in close coordination with the two pilots during all phases of flight. The Flight Engineer position was usually placed on the main flight deck just aft of the pilot and copilot. Earlier referred to as the flight mechanic on the four engine commercial seaplanes like the Sikorsky S-42, Martin M-130 and the Boeing 314, the Flight Engineer role was referred to as the Engineer on the first very large flying boat, the Dornier Do-X where he operated a large and complex side facing engineering station similar to later large transport aircraft. The first commercial land airplane to include a flight engineering station was the Boeing 307 but only ten were built before the onset of World War II; during the war the Avro Lancaster bomber and Handley Page Halifax required a Flight Engineer as these large bombers had only one pilot. The first military operation involving Flight Engineers was in February 1941 on a Short Stirling, and was the first four-engined bomber raid of the war by the RAF.

— Freebase

Argyraspides

Argyraspides

The Argyraspides (in Greek: Ἀργυράσπιδες "Silver Shields"), were a division of the Macedonian army of Alexander the Great, who were so called because they carried silver-plated shields. They were picked men commanded by Nicanor, the son of Parmenion, and were held in high honour by Alexander. They were hypaspists, having changed their name to the Argyraspides whilst in India under Alexander (Arrian Anabasis 7.11.3). After the death of Alexander (323 BC) they followed Eumenes. They were veterans, and although most of them were over sixty, they were feared and revered due to their battle skills and experience. At the Battle of Gabiene they settled with Antigonus Monophthalmus when he managed to take possession of their baggage train (consisting of their families and the result of forty years of plunder). They obtained the return of their possessions, but in exchange delivered their General Eumenes to him (316 BC). Antigonus soon broke up the corps, finding it too turbulent to manage, also executing their commander, Antigenes. He sent them to Sibyrtius, the Macedonian satrap of Arachosia, with the order to dispatch them by small groups of two or three to dangerous missions, so that their numbers would rapidly dwindle. However, others may have been retired to live in Macedonian settlements in Asia. The Seleucid kings of Syria employed an infantry phalangite corps of the same name. At the Battle of Raphia in 217 BC the Argyraspides took up positions against the Ptolemaic phalanx. Polybius describes them as being armed in the Macedonian manner (Polyb. 5.79.4, 82.2). Their position besides the king at the Battle of Magnesia suggests that they were the premier infantry guard unit in the Seleucid army. They were men chosen from the whole kingdom (Polyb. 5.79.4) and constituted a corps of 10,000 men at Raphia. At the Daphne parade held by Antiochus IV Epiphanes in 166 BC the Argyraspides were 5,000 strong. However the corps of men described by Polybius as being armed and dressed in the 'Roman fashion' numbered 5,000, and Bar-Kochva suggests that these men, who are described as being in the prime of life, might have also been a division of the Argyraspides, putting the number of the corps back up to 10,000 strong. The Roman Emperor Alexander Severus, among other ways in which he imitated Alexander the Great, had in his army bodies of men who were called argyroaspides and chrysaspides. Livy mentions a cavalry corps called silvershields as the royal cohort in the army of Antiochus III the Great at Magnesia.

— Wikipedia

captain

captain

A commissioned officer in the United States Navy, Coast Guard, NOAA Corps, or PHS Corps of a grade superior to a commander and junior to a rear admiral (lower half). A captain is equal in grade or rank to an Army, Marine Corps, or Air Force colonel.

— Wiktionary

United States Uniformed Services

United States Uniformed Services

The United States Uniformed Services is a group of seven (7) uniformed services of the United States federal government defined by federal law. The United States Uniformed Services includes the five armed services (military) and two non-military services. The armed services are the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. The non-military services are the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps.

— Wiktionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "grievous"?
  • A. deplorable
  • B. afflictive
  • C. baleful
  • D. trifling