Synonyms containing farringdon road

We've found 5,198 synonyms:

Road

Road

rōd, n. a highway for traffic: (B.) a plundering excursion.—ns. Road, Road′stead, Roads, a place where ships ride at anchor; Road′-āg′ent, a highwayman: a commercial traveller; Road′-bed, the bed or foundation of a road: the whole superstructure thereon; Road′-book, a guide-book; Road′-car, a kind of omnibus; Road′-harr′ow, a machine for dragging over roads out of repair; Road′ing, the act of running races with teams; Road′-lev′el, a plumb-level used in the construction of roads; Road′-locomō′tive, a road-steamer; Road′-machine′, a scraper used in road-making; Road′man, Roads′man, one who keeps a road in repair; Road′-met′al, broken stones for roads; Road′-roll′er, a heavy roller used on a macadamised road; Road′-run′ner, a large ground-cuckoo; Road′-scrāp′er, an implement for levelling roads and clearing them of loose stones, &c.; Road′side, footpath: wayside; Road′stead, a place near a shore where vessels may anchor; Road′-steam′er, a locomotive with broad wheels for roads; Road′ster, a horse for driving or riding on the road: a coach-driver: a bicycle, or tricycle; Road′-survey′or, one who supervises roads; Road′way, the way or part of a road or street travelled by carriages; Road′-weed, a plant of the genus Plantago.—adj. Road′worthy, fit for the road.—By the road, by the highway; On the road, travelling; Rule of the road, the custom of the country in passing on a highway; Take to the road, to become a highwayman. [A.S. rád, a riding—rád, pa.t. of rídan, to ride.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Rail

Rail

rāl, n. a bar of timber or metal extending from one support to another, as in fences, staircases, &c.: one of those steel bars used on the permanent way of a railway, generally of that form known as the T-rail: a barrier: the railway as a means of travel or transport: (archit.) the horizontal part of a frame and panel: (naut.) the forecastle-rail, poop-rail, and top-rail are bars across the forecastle, &c.—v.t. to enclose with rails: to furnish with rails.—ns. Rail′-bend′er, a screw-press for straightening rails; Rail′-bor′er, a hand-drill for rails; Rail′-chair, an iron block by which the rails are secured to the sleepers; Rail′-clamp, a wedge for clamping a rail firmly; Rail′-coup′ling, a bar by which the opposite rails of a railway are connected at curves, switches, &c.; Rail′-guard, a guard-rail before a front wheel; Rail′ing, a fence of posts and rails: material for rails; Rail′-punch, a machine for punching holes in the webs of rails; Rail′road, Rail′way, a road or way laid with iron rails on which carriages run.—v.t. Rail′road (U.S.), to push forward fast.—ns. Rail′roader, one employed about a railway; Rail′road-worm, the apple maggot; Rail′-saw, a portable machine for sawing off metal rails; Rail′-split′ter (U.S.), one who splits logs into rails for a fence; Rail′way-car, a vehicle for the transportation of passengers and goods; Rail′way-carr′iage, a carriage for the conveyance of passengers; Rail′way-cross′ing, an intersection of railway-lines: an intersection of an ordinary road with a railroad; Rail′way-slide, a turn-table; Rail′way-stitch, a loose and rapid stitch in knitting or crochet-work; Rail′way-train (see Train).—Railway company, a stock company formed for the construction and working of a railway, usually organised by a legislative enactment.—Elevated railway, an elevated bridge-like structure used for railway purposes, to avoid obstruction of surface roadways; Military railway, a railway equipped for military service, the locomotives being armoured, and the carriages armour-plated and provided with portholes for rifles; Portable railway, a light railway made in detachable sections, and so suited for carrying easily from place to place. [Low Ger. regel, prob. through O. Fr. reille; cf. Ger. riegel, a bar. Some refer to L. regula through O. Fr. reille.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

road maintenance

road maintenance

A type of maintenance or change to the layout, road signage, surface of a road or a road maintenance contract or road surface upgrade to a specific element or facet of a road arranged, agreed, planned, delivered and achieved at an appropriate day, date and time according to priority and proof of requirement.

— Editors Contribution

Great North Road, Zambia

Great North Road, Zambia

The Great North Road is a major route in Zambia, running north from Lusaka through Kabwe, Kapiri Mposhi Serenje, Mpika, Kasama, Mbala and Mpulungu. 82km North of Mpika is a signposted left turn onto a well maintained gravel road leading to Shiwa Ng'andu and Kapishya Hot Springs. Historically speaking, it is the Zambian section of the Cape to Cairo Road envisioned by Cecil John Rhodes. In this context, the road from Zambia's border with Zimbabwe at Chirundu to Lusaka is also regarded as being part of the Great North Road, and the portion from Mbala to Mupulungu could be regarded as a spur linking to the Lake Tanganyika steamer service which was popular with travellers up to the 1950s. When the Mpika-Tanzania highway via Tunduma was upgraded in the 1960s and provided a good route through to Dar es Salaam and Arusha, this section became known as the Great North Road rather than the Mpika-Mbala section which might be referred to as the Old Great North Road. In the centre of Lusaka, the Great North Road is named Cairo Road and this became the city's business and commercial centre, and busiest thoroughfare, now by-passed by heavy goods vehicles for through traffic by Lumumba Road.

— Freebase

Corduroy road

Corduroy road

A corduroy road or log road is a type of road made by placing sand-covered logs perpendicular to the direction of the road over a low or swampy area. The result is an improvement over impassable mud or dirt roads, yet rough in the best of conditions and a hazard to horses due to shifting loose logs. This type of road was constructed in Roman times. It is known to have been used as early as 4000 BC with examples found in Glastonbury, England. Compare the puncheon or plank road, which uses hewn boards instead of logs, resulting in a smoother and safer surface. Corduroy roads can also be built as a foundation for other surfacing. If the logs are buried in wet, acidic, anaerobic soils such as peat or muskeg they decay very slowly. A few corduroy road foundations that date back to the early 20th century still exist in the United States. One example is the Alaska Highway between Burwash Landing and Koidern, Yukon, which was rebuilt in 1943, less than a year after the original route was graded on thin soil and vegetation over permafrost, by using corduroy, then building gravel road on top. During the 1980s, the gravel was covered with a chip-seal. The late 1990s saw replacement of this road with modern road construction, including rerouting of the entire highway.

— Freebase

Cheapside

Cheapside

Cheapside is a street in the City of London, the historic and modern financial centre of London, which forms part of the A40 London to Fishguard road. It links St. Martin's Le Grand with Poultry. Near its eastern end at Bank junction, where it becomes Poultry, is Mansion House, the Bank of England, and Bank station. To the west is St. Paul's Cathedral, St. Paul's tube station and Paternoster Square. In the Middle Ages, it was known as Westcheap, as opposed to Eastcheap, another street in the City, near London Bridge. The boundaries of the wards of Cheap, Cordwainer and Bread Street run along Cheapside and Poultry; prior to boundary changes in 2003 the road was divided amongst Farringdon Within and Cripplegate wards in addition to the current three. The contemporary Cheapside is widely known as the location of a range of retail and food outlets and offices, as well as the City's only major shopping centre, One New Change.

— Freebase

El Camino Bignum

El Camino Bignum

The road mundanely called El Camino Real, running along San Francisco peninsula. It originally extended all the way down to Mexico City; many portions of the old road are still intact. Navigation on the San Francisco peninsula is usually done relative to El Camino Real, which defines logical north and south even though it isn't really north-south in many places. El Camino Real runs right past Stanford University and so is familiar to hackers.The Spanish word ‘real’ (which has two syllables: /ray·ahl´/) means ‘royal’; El Camino Real is ‘the royal road’. In the FORTRAN language, a real quantity is a number typically precise to seven significant digits, and a double precision quantity is a larger floating-point number, precise to perhaps fourteen significant digits (other languages have similar real types).When a hacker from MIT visited Stanford in 1976, he remarked what a long road El Camino Real was. Making a pun on ‘real’, he started calling it ‘El Camino Double Precision’ — but when the hacker was told that the road was hundreds of miles long, he renamed it ‘El Camino Bignum’, and that name has stuck. (See bignum.)[GLS has since let slip that the unnamed hacker in this story was in fact himself —ESR]In the early 1990s, the synonym El Camino Virtual was been reported as an alternate at IBM and Amdahl sites in the Valley.Mathematically literate hackers in the Valley have also been heard to refer to some major cross-street intersecting El Camino Real as “El Camino Imaginary”. One popular theory is that the intersection is located near Moffett Field — where they keep all those complex planes.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Road pricing

Road pricing

Road pricing (also road user charges) are direct charges levied for the use of roads, including road tolls, distance or time based fees, congestion charges and charges designed to discourage use of certain classes of vehicle, fuel sources or more polluting vehicles. These charges may be used primarily for revenue generation, usually for road infrastructure financing, or as a transportation demand management tool to reduce peak hour travel and the associated traffic congestion or other social and environmental negative externalities associated with road travel such as air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, visual intrusion, noise and road accidents.In most countries toll roads, toll bridges and toll tunnels are often used primarily for revenue generation to repay for long-term debt issued to finance the toll facility, or to finance capacity expansion, operations and maintenance of the facility itself, or simply as general tax funds. Road congestion pricing for entering an urban area, or pollution charges levied on vehicles with higher tailpipe emissions are typical schemes implemented to price externalities. The application of congestion charges is currently limited to a small number of cities and urban roads, and the notable schemes include the Electronic Road Pricing in Singapore, the London congestion charge, the Stockholm congestion tax, the Milan Area C, and high-occupancy toll lanes in the United States. Examples of pollution pricing schemes include the London low emission zone and the discontinued Ecopass in Milan. In some European countries there is a period-based charge for the use of motorways and expressways, based on a vignette or sticker attached to a vehicle, and in a few countries vignettes are required for the use of any road. Mileage based usage fees (MBUF) or distance based charging has been implemented for heavy vehicles based on truck weight and distance traveled in New Zealand (called RUC), Switzerland (LSVA), Germany (LKW-Maut), Austria (Go-Maut), Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, and in four US states: Oregon, New York, Kentucky and New Mexico.Many recent road pricing schemes have proved controversial, with a number of high-profile schemes in the US and the UK being cancelled, delayed or scaled back in response to opposition and protest. Critics maintain that congestion pricing is not equitable, places an economic burden on neighboring communities, has a negative effect on retail businesses and on economic activity in general, and is just another tax. A 2006 survey of economic literature on the subject, however, finds that most economists agree that some form of road pricing to reduce congestion is economically viable, although there is disagreement on what form road pricing should take. Economists disagree over how to set tolls, how to cover common costs, what to do with any excess revenues, whether and how "losers" from tolling previously free roads should be compensated, and whether to privatize highways.

— Wikipedia

Open Road Integrated Media

Open Road Integrated Media

Open Road Integrated Media is a digital publisher and multimedia content company. Open Road creates connections between authors and their audiences by marketing its ebooks through a new proprietary online platform which uses premium video content and social media. Open Road has published ebooks from legendary authors including William Styron, Pat Conroy, Jack Higgins, and Virginia Hamilton and has launched new e-stars like Mary Glickman. As part of Open Road’s commitment to bring books to all screens, several book-to-film adaptations, including William Styron’s Lie Down in Darkness and Mary Glickman’s Home in the Morning, are in development.

— CrunchBase

Waze

Waze

Waze is a social traffic & navigation app based on the world’s largest community of drivers sharing real time road info and contributing to the "common good" out there on the road. By simply driving around with Waze open users passively contribute traffic and other road data. Users can take a more active role by sharing road reports on accidents, police traps, or any other hazards along the way, helping to give other users in the area a ‘heads-up’ about what’s to come.

— CrunchBase

Crossroad

Crossroad

a road that crosses another; an obscure road intersecting or avoiding the main road

— Webster Dictionary

Turnpike

Turnpike

to form, as a road, in the manner of a turnpike road; into a rounded form, as the path of a road

— Webster Dictionary

Speed limit

Speed limit

Road speed limits are used in most countries to regulate the speed of road vehicles. Speed limits may define maximum, minimum or no speed limit and are normally indicated using a traffic sign. Speed limits are commonly set by the legislative bodies of nations or provincial governments and enforced by national or regional police and / or judicial bodies. The first maximum speed limit was the 10 mph limit introduced in the United Kingdom in 1861. From 2005 to 2010, the highest posted speed limit was 160 km/h in Abu Dhabi, although this was reduced to 140 km/h in 2011. However, some roads have no speed limit for certain classes of vehicles. Best known are Germany's less congested Autobahns, where automobile drivers have no mandated maximum speed. Measurements from the German State of Brandenburg in 2006 show average speeds of 137 km/h on 4-lane sections, and 142 km/h on 6-lane sections, without mandatory speed limits. Rural areas on the Isle of Man, the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra also lack speed limits, but speeds are lower when measured on those lower design roads. Speed limits are usually set to attempt to cap road traffic speed; there are several reasons for wanting to do this. It is often done with an intention to improve road traffic safety and reduce the number of road traffic casualties from traffic collisions. In their World report on road traffic injury prevention report, the World Health Organization identify speed control as one of various interventions likely to contribute to a reduction in road casualties. Speed limits may also be set in an attempt to reduce the environmental impact of road traffic, and to satisfy local community wishes. Some cities have reduced limits to as little as 30 km/h for both safety and efficiency reasons.

— Freebase

Nyalas

Nyalas

Nyalas is a small town in the Malacca, Malaysia, situated within the parliamentary constituency of Jasin. It is located in the northeastern corner of Melaka, bordering the Tampin District in Negeri Sembilan. Nyalas is connected by road to various towns. Air Kuning is about 5 km north, and can be accessed by the State Road M15; the M15 leads to Jasin Town about 35 km away. Along this route, Simpang Bekoh and Asahan town can be found. Selandar is located southwest of Nyalas about 11 km away, and is connected by the state road M8. To the south of Nyalas is the Federal Land Settlement area of Felda Bukit Senggeh, where rubber and palm oil plantations provide the economic drive for settlers. Nyalas is separated from Kampung Bukit Senggeh by a hill range consisting of Bukit Batu Lebah, Batu Hampar hill and Bukit Batu Tiga. Nyalas Town faces Gunung Ledang and, because it is located on flat land, it offers panoramic views of the hills that are considered especially beautiful in the misty conditions of the early morning. A new road connecting Nyalas through Felda Bukit Senggeh to Jasin town is currently under construction by two phases. Phase one linking Felda Bukit Senggeh to the Simpang Bekoh-Selandar road is almost completed and is ready for use. The second phase leading to Jasin. Once this 2nd phase new road is completed by the end of 2009, the travel time taken from Nyalas to Jasin town will be greatly reduced to about half an hour from currently about an hour. The road at the Felda Bukit Senggeh is being straightened and widened to smoothen the traffic once these connections are completed. The new link will open many opportunities in the agricultural, farming and tourism sector. State Government is making all the necessary infrastructure in order to attract investors to invest in the said sector. Unlike the district of Selandar where major industries are prohibited due to its provision as the water catchment area, Nyalas is free from this restriction. Felda Bukit Senggeh, Nyalas and further north area such as Air Kuning can benefit the most once this new road connection is completed.

— Freebase

rade

rade

[Fr.] An old spelling of the sea-term road. (See road">road.)

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. defuse
  • B. merge
  • C. combine
  • D. aggregate