Synonyms containing father dougal mcguire

We've found 4,192 synonyms:

Father Dougal McGuire

Father Dougal McGuire

Father Dougal McGuire is a character in the Channel 4 sitcom Father Ted. Created by Arthur Mathews and Graham Linehan, Dougal was portrayed by comedian Ardal O'Hanlon for the programme's three series. The character is a childlike, simple-minded Roman Catholic curate exiled to Craggy Island, a small island off the coast of Galway. Dougal originated as an unseen character in a short-lived stand-up routine performed by Mathews in the late 1980s. Portraying an early version of Father Ted Crilly on-stage, Mathews occasionally discussed Dougal as one of Ted's great friends. In 1994, the writers took Father Ted to television, casting O'Hanlon as the on-screen Dougal. In a 2001 poll conducted by Channel 4, Dougal was ranked fifth on their list of the 100 Greatest TV Characters.

— Wikipedia

The McGuire Sisters

The McGuire Sisters

The McGuire Sisters were a singing trio in American popular music. The group was composed of three sisters: Ruby Christine McGuire (July 30, 1926 – December 28, 2018) Dorothy "Dottie" McGuire (February 13, 1928 – September 7, 2012) Phyllis McGuire (born February 14, 1931)Among their most popular songs are "Sincerely" and "Sugartime", both number-one hits.

— Wikipedia

Matt Lee

Matt Lee

Gammer is a UK hardcore and hard dance producer and DJ. Gammer made his first appearance in the Hardcore scene during 2002 and since he has gone on to be a very successful and prolific producer, being best known for his extensive discography on the revamped Essential Platinum label. A large proportion of his tracks on the label are collaborations with the label's founder Dougal, though he has also had solo releases on his own label, Muffin Music. He has appeared with other artists such as Hixxy, and Darren Styles. Gammer is considered one of the leading artists in UK hardcore. Aside from his vinyl and digital download releases, his music appears on many albums, including the highly successful Bonkers series. In April 2007, Gammer started his own label, Muffin Music, and released a promotional mix for it. In 2008, 2009 and now 2010, Gammer was named Hardcore DJ of the year, a major honour won previously by Darren Styles. In 2010 Gammer and Dougal won best Hardcore producers. It is also widely believed that Gammer produces for Baked Potato Records, where he releases singles under the name "Anon". Gammer originally began his producing career in Hardcore before moving into Hard Dance. He has produced many Hard Dance tracks under 'Matt Lee'. One track in particular caught the attention of Hard Dance DJ Andy Whitby and, as a result, Gammer was signed to Whitby's AWsum label.

— Freebase

Abba

Abba

ab′a, n. father, a term retained in the Gr. text of the New Testament, together with its translation 'father,' hence Abba father, applied to God the Father: also a bishop in the Syriac and Coptic Churches. [L.—Gr.—Syriac and Chaldee, abbā—Heb. ab, father.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Father

Father

fä′thėr, n. a male parent: an ancestor or forefather: a fatherly protector: a contriver or originator: a title of respect applied to a venerable man, to confessors, monks, priests, &c.: a member of certain fraternities, as 'Fathers of the Oratory,' &c.: the oldest member of any profession or other body: one of a group of ecclesiastical writers of the early centuries, usually ending with Ambrose, Jerome, and Augustine: the first person of the Trinity.—v.t. to adopt: to ascribe to one as his offspring or production.—ns. Fa′therhood, state of being a father: fatherly authority; Fa′ther-in-law, the father of one's husband or wife; Fa′therland, the land of one's fathers—from the Ger. Vaterland; Fa′ther-lash′er, a name applied to two bull-heads found on the British coasts, belonging to the Gurnard family.—adj. Fa′therless, destitute of a living father: without a known author.—ns. Fa′therlessness; Fa′therliness.—adj. Fa′therly, like a father in affection and care: paternal.—n. Fa′thership.—Holy Father, the Pope.—Be gathered to one's fathers (B.), to die and be buried. [A.S. fæder; Ger. vater, L. pater, Gr. patēr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Paternal

Paternal

pa-tėr′nal, adj. fatherly: showing the disposition of a father: derived from a father: hereditary.—n. Pater′nalism.—adv. Pater′nally.—n. Pater′nity, state of being a father: fatherhood: the relation of a father to his children: origination or authorship. [Fr. paternel—Low L. paternalis—L. paternuspater (Gr. patēr), a father.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sincerely

Sincerely

"Sincerely" is a popular song written by Harvey Fuqua and Alan Freed and published in 1954. It was originally recorded by The Moonglows, who scored a #1 one single on the Billboard R&B Juke Box chart and #20 on the Billboard Top 100 charts. The best-selling version was a pop cover recorded by The McGuire Sisters, entering the charts in 1954 and reaching number one the next year. Many R&B collectors decry the cover version by the McGuire Sisters which kept the Moonglows off the Pop charts, but the Moonglows' version stole lyrics from a 1951 Dominoes tune, "That's What You're Doing To Me". The bridge in both songs is almost identical: "Lord, won't you tell me/ Why I love that woman so?/ She doesn't want me/ But I'll never let her go". In 1988 the country quartet Forester Sisters reached #8 on the Billboard Hot Country chart with their remake of the song.

— Freebase

Rock Ayers

Rock Ayers

Ayers Rock were an Australian jazz fusion, progressive rock band which formed in 1973. They issued three albums, Big Red Rock, Beyond and Hot Spell before disbanding in 1981. Early members were Ray Burton on guitar and vocals, Duncan McGuire on bass guitar, and Mark Kennedy on drums who formed a trio Burton McGuire & Kennedy in June 1973. In August, after James Doyle had joined on lead guitar, the group changed their name to Ayers Rock. The group disbanded in 1981, according to Australian rock music historian, Ian McFarlane, the members "were seen as 'musician's musicians'. The band issued a series of technically proficient recordings, but in the long run any quest for commercial acceptance was marred by the seriousness of the music".

— Freebase

Shenandoah

Shenandoah

Shenandoah is an American country music group founded in Muscle Shoals, Alabama in 1984 by Marty Raybon, Ralph Ezell, Stan Thorn, Jim Seales, and Mike McGuire. Thorn and Ezell left the band in the mid-1990s, with Rocky Thacker taking over on bass guitar; Keyboardist Stan Munsey joined the line up in 1995. The band split up in 1997 after Raybon left. Seals, Munsey and McGuire reformed the band in 2000 with lead singer Brent Lamb, who was in turn replaced by Curtis Wright and then by Jimmy Yeary. Ezell rejoined in the early 2000s, and after his 2007 death, he was replaced by Mike Folsom. Shenandoah has released nine studio albums, of which two have been certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America. The band has also charted twenty-six singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, including the Number One hits "The Church on Cumberland Road," "Sunday in the South" and "Two Dozen Roses" from 1989, "Next to You, Next to Me" from 1990, and "If Bubba Can Dance" from 1994. The late 1994-early 1995 single "Somewhere in the Vicinity of the Heart," which featured guest vocals from Alison Krauss, won both artists a Grammy Award for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.

— Freebase

Ayers Rock

Ayers Rock

Ayers Rock were an Australian jazz fusion, progressive rock band which formed in 1973. They issued three albums, Big Red Rock, Beyond and Hot Spell before disbanding in 1981. Early members were Ray Burton on guitar and vocals, Duncan McGuire on bass guitar, and Mark Kennedy on drums who formed a trio Burton McGuire & Kennedy in June 1973. In August, after James Doyle had joined on lead guitar, the group changed their name to Ayers Rock. The group disbanded in 1981, according to Australian rock music historian, Ian McFarlane, the members "were seen as 'musician's musicians'. The band issued a series of technically proficient recordings, but in the long run any quest for commercial acceptance was marred by the seriousness of the music".

— Freebase

Goodnite, Sweetheart, Goodnite

Goodnite, Sweetheart, Goodnite

"Goodnite, Sweetheart, Goodnite" is a popular song that was a hit during the mid-1950s. It was written by Calvin Carter and James "Pookie" Hudson in 1953. It was originally recorded by the rhythm and blues group, The Spaniels, in 1954. The original version peaked at number five on the R&B Best Sellers chart. The best-selling version of the song was recorded by The McGuire Sisters in 1954. It was also recorded in 1954 by country music duo Johnnie & Jack. The song became well known again in the late 1970s as the closing song performed by Sha Na Na on their weekly variety show as well as its appearance in American Graffiti and again in the late 1980s after its use in the major hit film Three Men and a Baby. This song is completely different from the 1930s song sung by Rudy Vallée, among others. This song has the sub-title "it's time to go" with the now famous doo-wop bass line intro. This bass line was however not included in the McGuire Sisters' cover version, made to sell to white audiences. Dick Biondi plays the song at the end of every show on Chicago's 94.7 WLS-FM. The song is sometimes covered by the band The Avett Brothers to close their shows.

— Freebase

Lalaine

Lalaine

Lalaine Vergara-Paras (born June 3, 1987), known mononymously as Lalaine, is an American actress, singer, and songwriter. She is best known for her role as Miranda Sanchez on the Disney Channel teen sitcom Lizzie McGuire, which ran from 2001 to 2004. Her other most notable appearances include the television film Annie (1999) and as Abby Ramirez in the Disney Channel Original Movie You Wish! (2003). After appearing in the roles of Young Cosette and Eponine in a Broadway musical production of Les Misérables as a child, Lalaine pursued a career in music. She signed with Warner Bros. Records following the end of Lizzie McGuire and released one studio album and one extended play, both of which saw little commercial success mostly due to only having a limited release. From 2010 to 2011, Lalaine played bass guitar in the band Vanity Theft.

— Wikipedia

New adult fiction

New adult fiction

New adult (NA) fiction, also rendered as new-adult fiction, is a developing genre of fiction with protagonists in the 18–30 age bracket. St. Martin's Press first coined the term in 2009, when they held a special call for "...fiction similar to YA that can be published and marketed as adult—a sort of an 'older YA' or 'new adult'". New adult fiction tends to focus on issues such as leaving home, developing sexuality, and negotiating education and career choices. The genre has gained popularity rapidly over the last few years, particularly through books by self-published bestselling authors like Jennifer L. Armentrout, Cora Carmack, Colleen Hoover, Anna Todd and Jamie McGuire.The genre was originally faced with criticism, as some viewed it as a marketing scheme, while others claimed the readership was not there to publish the material. In contrast, others claimed that the term was necessary; a publicist for HarperCollins described it as "a convenient label because it allows parents and bookstores and interested readers to know what is inside".Examples of books in the new adult genre include Sarah J. Maas' A Court of Thorns and Roses and Throne of Glass, Jennifer L. Armentrout's Wait For You, Jamie McGuire's Beautiful Disaster, Colleen Hoover's Slammed, Cora Carmack's Losing It, Kendall Ryan's The Impact of You and Casey McQuiston's Red, White & Royal Blue.

— Wikipedia

Hilary Duff

Hilary Duff

Hilary Erhard Duff (born September 28, 1987) is an American actress, businesswoman, singer-songwriter, producer, and writer. Duff began her acting career at a young age and quickly became labeled a teen idol as the title character of the television series Lizzie McGuire (2001–2004) and in the theatrical film based on the series, The Lizzie McGuire Movie (2003). Thereafter, she appeared in numerous films, with leading roles in Agent Cody Banks (2003), Cheaper by the Dozen (2003), A Cinderella Story (2004), and Cheaper by the Dozen 2 (2005). She later began appearing in independent films playing a wider range of roles, such as an oversexed popstar in War, Inc. (2008), a suicidal and rebellious teenager in According to Greta (2009), and as the title character in the controversial The Haunting of Sharon Tate (2019). She has also executive produced several of the projects she starred in, such as According to Greta, Beauty and the Briefcase (2010) and The Haunting of Sharon Tate. Since 2015, she has starred as Kelsey Peters on TV Land's longest-running original comedy-drama series Younger, for which she has received nominations for People's Choice Awards in 2016 and 2017. Duff first came to prominence in music after releasing her Christmas-themed debut studio album, Santa Claus Lane (2002), through Walt Disney Records. She then enjoyed significant commercial success and platinum and gold certifications with her subsequent studio albums released through Hollywood Records, including Metamorphosis (2003), Hilary Duff (2004), Most Wanted (2005), and Dignity (2007). The latter earned her acclaim for experimenting with dance music, despite the unpopularity of the genre at the time. Following a hiatus from music, Duff signed with RCA Records for her fifth studio album, Breathe In. Breathe Out. (2015), which debuted in the top five positions in her major markets: the US and Canada. In addition to music and acting, she has also co-authored a trilogy of novels, beginning with Elixir (2010), which became a New York Times best seller, and followed by the sequels Devoted (2011) and True (2013). Her success in the entertainment industry led her to venture into business with fashion lines of her own such as Stuff by Hilary Duff, Femme for DKNY, and most recently the "Muse x Hilary Duff" collection, a collaborative effort with GlassesUSA which was credited to have boosted GlassesUSA's sales for its premium brands. She has also invested in a number of businesses ranging from cosmetics to children's products. In 2019, she was appointed as the chief brand officer of Naturalena Brands' "Happy Little Camper" and "Veeda" lines of products. Duff has been the subject of media attention throughout her career, with interest focusing on her romantic relationships and public image, especially her relationships with Aaron Carter and Joel Madden when she was a teenager. Duff has been married twice, firstly to former professional ice hockey player Mike Comrie from 2010 till 2016, and later to record producer and singer-songwriter Matthew Koma since 2019. Duff has also been hailed as an inspiration by subsequent Disney teen stars such as Miley Cyrus, Demi Lovato, Bridgit Mendler, and Selena Gomez and has sold an estimated 15 million records since her debut in 2002.

— Wikipedia

pinosity

pinosity

of or pertaining to the level to which a wine exhibits the desired characteristics of a pinot noir. May be used in reference to exhalting the native pinot or denigrating another varietal. First referenced by Australian wine maker, Dougal Herd 2004

— Wiktionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "miserable"?
  • A. comfy
  • B. pathetic
  • C. misfortunate
  • D. measly