Synonyms containing fine clothes

We've found 4,378 synonyms:

Cloth

Cloth

kloth, n. woven material from which garments or coverings are made: clothing: the usual dress of a trade or profession, esp. the clerical:—pl. Cloths.—v.t. Clothe (klōth), to cover with a garment: to provide with clothes: (fig.) to invest as with a garment: to cover:—pr.p. clōth′ing; pa.t. and pa.p. clōthed or clad.—n.pl. Clothes (klōthz, coll. klōz), garments or articles of dress: blankets for a bed.—ns. Clothes′-bas′ket, a large basket for holding and carrying clothes; Clothes′-brush, a brush for clothes; Clothes′-horse, Clothes′-screen, a frame for hanging clothes on to dry; Clothes′-line, a rope or wire for hanging clothes on to dry; Clothes′-moth, one of various tineas whose larvæ feed on furs, woollens, &c., spinning cases out of these; Clothes′-pin, a forked piece of wood to secure clothes on a line; Clothes′-press, a place for holding clothes; Cloth′-hall, a cloth-exchange building or market; Cloth′ier, one who makes or sells cloth; Cloth′ing, clothes, garments: covering; Cloth′-yard, formerly the yard by which cloth was measured.—Cloth of gold, a tissue consisting of threads of gold and silk or wool; Cloth of state, a canopy; Cloth-yard shaft, an arrow a cloth-yard long.—Clothe in words, to express ideas in words; Clothe on, or upon, to invest: to cover.—American cloth, a kind of enamelled cloth, used for covering chairs, &c.—The cloth, the clerical profession: the clergy. [A.S. cláth, cloth; Ger. kleid, a garment.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hills Hoist

Hills Hoist

A Hills Hoist is a height-adjustable rotary clothes line, manufactured in Adelaide, South Australia by Lance Hill since 1945. The Hills Hoist and similar rotary clothes hoists remain a common fixture in many backyards in Australia and New Zealand. They are considered one of Australia's most recognisable icons, and are used frequently by artists as a metaphor for Australian suburbia in the 1950s and 1960s. Although originally a product name, the term "Hills Hoist" became synonymous with rotary clothes hoists in general, throughout Australia. As early as 1895 Colin Stewart and Allan Harley of Sun Foundry in Adelaide applied for a patent for an 'Improved Rotary and Tilting Clothes Drying Rack'. In their design the upper clothes line frame tilted to allow access to the hanging lines. Gilbert Toyne of Geelong patented four rotary clothes hoists designs between 1911 and 1946. Toyne's first patented clothes hoist was sold though the Aeroplane Clothes Hoist Company established in 1911. It was Toyne's 1925 all-metal model with its enclosed crown wheel-and-pinion winding mechanism that defined clothes hoist designs for decades to follow. Lance Hill began to manufacture the Hills rotary clothes hoist in his backyard in 1945. His wife apparently wanted an inexpensive replacement to the line and prop she had for drying clothes.

— Freebase

Wash

Wash

wosh, v.t. to cleanse with water: to overflow: to waste away by the action of water: to cover with a thin coat of metal or paint: in mining, to separate from earth by means of water.—v.i. to cleanse one's self, to cleanse clothes with water: to stand water, of clothes: (coll.) to stand the test.—n. a washing: the break of waves on the shore: the rough water left behind by a moving vessel: the shallow part of a river or arm of the sea: a marsh or fen: alluvial matter: waste liquor, refuse of food, &c.: that with which anything is washed: a lotion: a thin coat of paint, metal, &c.: (slang) a fictitious kind of sale of stock or other securities between parties of one interest, or by a broker who is at once the buyer and the seller, and who minds his own interest rather than that of his clients.—adj. Wash′able.—ns. Wash′-ball, a ball of toilet-soap; Wash′-bā′sin, -bowl, Wash′hand bā′sin, a bowl in which to wash face and hands; Wash′-board, a corrugated board for rubbing clothes on in washing: a thin plank placed on a boat's gunwale to prevent the sea from breaking over: a board round the bottom of the walls of a room; Wash′-bott′le, a bottle used by chemists for washing chemical preparations and instruments; Wash′-cloth, a piece of cloth used in washing; Wash′-dirt, earth rich enough in metal to pay for washing; Wash′er, one who washes: a flat ring of iron or leather between the nave of a wheel and the linch-pin, under the head of a screw, &c.—v.t to lift with washers; Wash′erman, a man who washes clothes, esp. for hire:—fem. Wash′erwoman; Wash′-gild′ing, a gilding made with an amalgam of gold from which the mercury is driven off by heat, leaving a coating of gold; Wash′-house, Wash′ing-house, a house for washing clothes in; Wash′iness, state of being watery, weakness, worthlessness; Wash′ing, the act of cleansing by water: the clothes washed, esp. at one time: what is washed; Was′hing-machine′, a machine for washing clothes; Wash′ing-pow′der, a powdered preparation used in washing clothes; Wash′ing-up, Wash′-up, cleaning up; Wash′-leath′er, split sheepskin prepared with oil in imitation of chamois, and used for household purposes: buff leather for regimental belts.—adj. Wash′-off, that will not stand washing.—ns. Wash′-out, an erosion of earth by the action of water, the hole made by such; Wash′-pot, a vessel for washing; Wash′-stand, Wash′hand stand, a piece of furniture for holding ewer, basin, and other requisites for washing a person; Wash′-tub, a tub for washing clothes.—adj. Wash′y, watery, moist: thin, feeble.—n. Rain′-wash, a washing away by the force of rain: a deposit formed by rain. [A.S. wascan; Ice

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fine

Fine

fīn, adj. excellent: beautiful: not coarse or heavy: subtle: thin: slender: exquisite: nice: delicate: overdone: showy: splendid: striking or remarkable (often ironically): pure, refined: consisting of small particles; sharp, keen.—v.t. to make fine: to refine: to purify: to change by imperceptible degrees.—adv. (Scot.) for finely, well.—v.t. Fine′-draw, to draw or sew up a rent so finely that it is not seen.—p.adj. Fine′-drawn, drawn out too finely.—adj. Fine′ish, somewhat fine.—adv. Fine′ly.—ns. Fine′ness; Fin′er (same as Refiner); Fin′ery, splendour, fine or showy things: a place where anything is fined or refined: a furnace for making iron malleable.—adjs. Fine′-spok′en, using fine phrases; Fine′-spun, finely spun out: artfully contrived.—Fine arts, as painting, sculpture, music, those chiefly concerned with the beautiful—opp. to the Useful or Industrial arts. [Fr.,—L. finitus, finished, from finīre, to finish, finis, an end.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Clotheshorse

Clotheshorse

A clotheshorse or clothes horse, sometimes called a clothes rack, drying horse, clothes maiden, drying rack, drying stand, airer, or winterdyke, refers to a frame upon which clothes are hung after washing to enable them to dry. The frame is usually made of wood, metal or plastic. There are many types of drying racks, including large, stationary outdoor racks, smaller, folding portable racks, and wall-mounted drying racks. A drying rack is similar in usage and function to a clothes line, and used as an alternative to the clothes dryer. The name clothes horse was in use by 1800.

— Freebase

Day-fine

Day-fine

A day-fine, day fine, unit fine or structured fine is a unit of fine payment that, above a minimum fine, is based on the offender's daily personal income. A crime is punished with incarceration for a determined number of days, or with fines. As incarceration is a financial punishment, in the effect of preventing work, a day-fine represents one day incarcerated and without salary. It is argued to be just, because if both high-income and low-income population are punished with the same jail time, they should also be punished with a proportionally similar income loss. An analogy may be drawn with income tax, which is also proportional to the income, even progressively. Jurisdictions employing the day-fine include Denmark (Danish: dagbøde), Estonia (Estonian: päevamäär), Finland (Finnish: päiväsakko), France (French: Jour-amende), Germany (German: Tagessatz), Romania (Romanian: zi-amendă), Sweden (Swedish: dagsbot), Switzerland, and Macao.

— Wikipedia

Clothes hanger

Clothes hanger

A clothes hanger, coat hanger, or coathanger, is a device in the shape of: ⁕Human shoulders designed to facilitate the hanging of a coat, jacket, sweater, shirt, blouse or dress in a manner that prevents wrinkles, with a lower bar for the hanging of trousers or skirts. ⁕Clamp for the hanging of trousers, skirts, or kilts. Both types can be combined in a single hanger. There are three basic types of clothes hangers. The first is the wire hanger, which has a simple loop of wire, most often steel, in a flattened triangle shape that continues into a hook at the top. The second is the wooden hanger, which consists of a flat piece of wood cut into a boomerang-like shape with the edges sanded down to prevent damage to the clothing, and a hook, usually of metal, protruding from the point. Some wooden hangers have a rounded bar from tip to tip, forming a flattened triangle. This bar is designed to hang the trousers belonging to the jacket. The third kind and most used in today's world are plastic coat hangers, which mostly mimic the shape of either a wire or wooden hanger. Plastic coat hangers are also produced in smaller sizes to accommodate the shapes of children's clothes. Some hangers have clips along the bottom for suspending skirts. Dedicated skirt and trousers hangers may not use the triangular shape at all, instead using just a rod with clips. Other hangers have little rings coming from the top two bars to hang straps from tank-tops on. Specialized pant hanger racks may accommodate many pairs of trousers. Foldable clothes hangers that are designed to be inserted through the collar area for ease of use and the reduction of stretching are an old, yet potentially useful variation on traditional clothes hangers. They have been patented over 200 times in the U.S. alone, as in U.S. Patent 0586456, awarded in 1897 to George E. Rideout.

— Freebase

refine

refine

to free (something, such as metal, sugar, or oil) from impurities or unwanted material;to free from moral imperfection : ELEVATE;to make something pure or improve something, especially by removing unwanted material;to improve an idea, method, system, etc. by making small changes;To make or become clear by the removal of impurities,to make a substance pure by removing unwanted material:clarify, clean, cleanse.to improve something or to make it pure, especially by removing material that is not wanted;To bring to perfection or completion:perfect,smooth.Idiom: smooth off the rough edges.purify, process, filter, cleanse, clarify, sift, distil, rarefy,improve, temper, hone, fine-tune, cultivate; improve or perfect by pruning or polishing:fine-tune, polish, down;make more complex, intricate, or richer:rarify, complicate, refine, elaborate;reduce to a fine, unmixed, or pure state; separate from extraneous matter or cleanse from impurities;to become more fine, elegant, or polished;Attenuate or reduce in vigor,intensity, strength, or validity by polishing or purifying; To make more precise or increase the discriminatory powers of;to purify/free from what is coarse,uncouth, vulgar, or debasing; make elegant or cultured;ameliorate, amend, better, enhance, enrich, help, meliorate, perfect, upgrade.

— Editors Contribution

Fine Gael

Fine Gael

Fine Gael is a centre-right to centrist political party in the Republic of Ireland. It is the largest party in Ireland in the Oireachtas, in local government, and in terms of Members of the European Parliament. The party has a membership of over 35,000, and is the senior partner governing in a coalition with the Labour Party, with the Fine Gael party leader Enda Kenny serving as Taoiseach. Enda Kenny has led the party since 2002. Fine Gael was founded on 8 September 1933 following the merger of its parent party Cumann na nGaedheal, the National Centre Party and the National Guard. Its origins lie in the struggle for Irish independence and the pro-Treaty side in the Irish Civil War, identifying in particular Michael Collins as the founder of the movement. Fine Gael is sometimes considered to be more on the political right in comparison to its main rival, Fianna Fáil. But Fine Gael has rarely governed Ireland without the Labour Party, a social-democratic party on the centre-left of Irish politics, apart from brief minority governments, as in 1987. Fine Gael describes itself as a "party of the progressive centre" conforming strongly to the ideals of Christian democracy and compassionate centrism, and is often seen as being moderate on social issues but conservative as regards economics. The party lists its core values as equality of opportunity, fiscal rectitude, free enterprise and reward, individual rights and responsibilities. It is strongly in favour of the European Union and opposed to physical force republicanism. The party's youth wing, Young Fine Gael, was formed in 1977, and has approximately four thousand members. Fine Gael is a founding member of the European People's Party and a member of the Centrist Democrat International.

— Freebase

Fine print

Fine print

Fine print, small print, or "mouseprint" is text following a promotional message that states its full conditions and limitations. Although the message it accompanies is the intended focus of attention with the use of Advertising techniques, fine print is legally required to fully disclose all terms or conditions, often in smaller print making it less noticeable. Fine print has been notoriously used to be inconspicuous or confusing, sometimes used by merchants to deceive a consumer into believing the offer is more advantageous than it really is. There is also strong evidence to suggest that the fine print is not read by the majority of consumers. Fine print may contrast what the larger print says. For example, if the larger print says "pre-approved" the fine print will say "subject to approval." Especially in pharmaceutical advertisements, fine print may accompany a warning message, but this message is often neutralized by the more eye-catching positive images and pleasant background music. Sometimes, television advertisements will flash text fine print in camouflagic colors, and for notoriously brief periods of time, making it difficult for the viewer to read.

— Freebase

Short

Short

short, adj. (comp. Short′er, superl. Short′est) not long in time or space: not tall: near at hand, early in date: scanty, lacking, insufficient: in error, deficient in wisdom, grasp, memory, &c.: narrow: abrupt, curt, sharp, uncivil: brittle, crumbling away readily: not prolonged in utterance, unaccented: (coll.) undiluted with water, neat: falling below a certain standard (with of): of stocks, &c., not having in possession when selling, not able to meet one's engagements, pertaining to short stocks or to those who have sold short.—adv. not long.—n. a summary account: a short time or syllable: whatever is deficient in number, quantity, &c.: a short sale, one who has made such: (pl.) small clothes, knee-breeches: the bran and coarse part of meal, in mixture.—ns. Short′age, deficiency; Short′-allow′ance, less than the regular allowance; Short′-and, the character '&,' the ampersand.—adj. Short′-armed, having short arms, not reaching far.—ns. Short′-bill, one having less than ten days to run; Short′-cake, a rich tea-cake made short and crisp with butter or lard and baked—also Short′-bread (Scot.): (U.S.) a light cake, prepared in layers with fruit between, served with cream; Short′-cir′cuit (electr.), a path of comparatively low resistance between two points of a circuit.—n.pl. Short′-clothes, small clothes, the dress of young children after the first long clothes.—v.t. Short′-coat, to dress in short-coats.—n.pl. Short′-coats, the shortened skirts of a child when the first long clothes are left off.—n. Short′coming, act of coming or falling short of produce or result: neglect of, or failure in, duty.—n.pl. Short′-comm′ons (see Common).—n. Short′-cross, the short cross-bar of a printer's chase.—adjs. Short′-cut, cut short instead of in long shreds—of tobacco, &c.—also n.; Short′-dāt′ed, having short or little time to run from its date, as a bill.—n. Short′-divi′sion, a method of division with a divisor not larger than 12—opp. to Long-division.—v.t. Short′en, to make short: to deprive: to make friable.—v.i. to become short or shorter: to contract.—n. Short′-gown, a loose jacket with a skirt, worn by women, a bed-gown.—adj. Short′-grassed (Shak.), provided or covered with short grass.—n. Short′hand, an art by which writing is made shorter and easier, so as to keep pace with speaking.—adj. Short′-hand′ed, not having the proper number of servants, work-people, &c.—ns. Short′hander, a stenographer; Short′-horn, one of a breed of cattle having very short horns—Durham and Teeswater.—adj. Short′-horned

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Clothes horse

Clothes horse

A clothes horse, sometimes called a clothes rack, drying horse, clothes maiden, garment donkey, drying rack, drying stand, Frostick, airer, or (Scots) winterdyke, is a frame upon which clothes are hung after washing, indoors or outdoors, to dry by evaporation. The frame is usually made of wood, metal or plastic.

— Wikipedia

Clothing

Clothing

Clothing (also known as clothes, apparel and attire) is items worn on the body. Clothing is typically made of fabrics or textiles but over time has included garments made from animal skin or other thin sheets of materials put together. The wearing of clothing is mostly restricted to human beings and is a feature of all human societies. The amount and type of clothing worn depends on gender, body type, social, and geographic considerations. Clothing serves many purposes: it can serve as protection from the elements, rough surfaces, rash-causing plants, insect bites, splinters, thorns and prickles by providing a barrier between the skin and the environment. Clothes can insulate against cold or hot conditions, and they can provide a hygienic barrier, keeping infectious and toxic materials away from the body. Clothing also provides protection from ultraviolet radiation. Wearing clothes is also a social norm, and being deprived of clothing in front of others may be embarrassing. Not wearing clothes in public so that genitals, breasts or buttocks are visible could be considered indecent exposure.

— Wikipedia

Clothes valet

Clothes valet

Clothes valet, also called men's valet, valet stand and coat rack, is an item of furniture on which clothes may be hung. Typical features of valets include trouser hangers, jacket hangers, shoe bars, and a tray organizer for miscellaneous, day-to-day objects like wallets and keys. Some also feature jewelry boxes. The gentleman's valet is a piece of furniture from a time where dress standards for men were much higher than those of today. The modern versions of the valet vary from the mass-produced, a standard coat hanger on a basic frame, to the bespoke valet aimed at those who probably wear bespoke suits. An electric clothes valet is used to warm clothes before dressing; it includes a timer to prevent overheating. In the United States, the term is frequently used to refer to a non-freestanding cabinet or tray for holding small personal items such as watches, cuff links, keys, or a cell phone. In this sense, it is a men's jewelry box.

— Freebase

Tineidae

Tineidae

Tineidae is a family of moths in the order Lepidoptera. Collectively, they are known as fungus moths or tineid moths. The family contains considerably more than 3,000 species in over 300 genera. Most of the tineid moths are small or medium-sized, with wings held roofwise over the body at rest. They are particularly common in the Palaearctic, but many occur elsewhere, and some are found very widely as introduced species. Tineids are unusual among Lepidoptera as the larvae of only a very small number of species feed on living plants, the majority feeding on fungi, lichens and detritus. The most familiar members of the family are the clothes moths, which have adapted to feeding on stored fabrics. The most widespread such species are the Common Clothes Moth, the Case-bearing Clothes Moth and the Carpet Moth; the Brown-dotted Clothes Moth despite its name preferentially feeds on feathers in bird nests. One remarkable genus is Ceratophaga, whose members feed exclusively on pure keratin in the form of the horns and hooves of dead mammals and even the shells of dead tortoises.

— Freebase

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A synonym of "dry"
  • A. juiceless
  • B. steamy
  • C. sodden
  • D. drippy