Synonyms containing flint cullet

We've found 242 synonyms:

Flint

Flint

flint, n. a hard mineral, a variety of quartz, from which fire is readily struck with steel: anything proverbially hard.—adj. made of flint, hard.—n. Flint′-glass, a very fine and pure kind of glass, so called because originally made of calcined flints.—adjs. Flint′-heart, -ed (Shak.), having a hard heart.—v.t. Flint′ify, to turn to flint.—ns. Flint′iness; Flint′-lock, a gun-lock having a flint fixed in the hammer for striking fire and igniting the priming.—adj. Flint′y, consisting of or like flint: hard: cruel.—Flint implements, arrow, axe, and spear heads, &c. made by man before the use of metals, commonly found in prehistoric graves, &c. [A.S. flint; Dan. flint; Gr. plinthos, a brick.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Flint glass

Flint glass

Flint glass is optical glass that has relatively high refractive index and low Abbe number. Flint glasses are arbitrarily defined as having an Abbe number of 50 to 55 or less. The currently known flint glasses have refractive indices ranging between 1.45 and 2.00. A concave lens of flint glass is commonly combined with a convex lens of crown glass to produce an achromatic doublet lens because of their compensating optical properties, which reduces chromatic aberration. With respect to glass, the term flint derives from the flint nodules found in the chalk deposits of southeast England that were used as a source of high purity silica by George Ravenscroft, circa 1662, to produce a potash lead glass that was the precursor to English lead crystal. Traditionally, flint glasses were lead glasses containing around 4–60% lead oxide; however, the manufacture and disposal of these glasses were sources of pollution. In many modern flint glasses, the lead can be replaced with other additives such as titanium dioxide and zirconium dioxide without significantly altering the optical properties of the glass. Flint glass can be fashioned into rhinestones which are used as diamond simulants.

— Freebase

Clactonian

Clactonian

The Clactonian is the name given by archaeologists to an industry of European flint tool manufacture that dates to the early part of the interglacial period known as the Hoxnian, the Mindel-Riss or the Holstein stages. Clactonian tools were made by Homo erectus rather than modern humans. The term is sometimes applied to early, crude flint tools from other regions that were made using similar methods. It is named after 400,000 year old finds made by Hazzledine Warren in a palaeochannel at Clacton-on-Sea in the English county of Essex in 1911. The artefacts found there included flint chopping tools, flint flakes and the tip of a worked wooden shaft along with the remains of a giant elephant and hippopotamus. Further examples of the tools have been found at sites including Barnfield Pit near Swanscombe in Kent and Barnham in Suffolk; similar industries have been identified across Northern Europe. The Clactonian industry involved striking thick, irregular flakes from a core of flint, which was then employed as a chopper. The flakes would have been used as crude knives or scrapers. Unlike the Oldowan tools from which Clactonian ones derived, some were notched implying that they were attached to a handle or shaft. Retouch is uncommon and the prominent bulb of percussion on the flakes indicates use of a hammerstone.

— Freebase

chert

chert

Massive generally dull colored and usually opaque quartzite or hornstone or impure chalcedony or other flint-like mineral. By general usage in mineralogy and geology, a chert does not have a conchoidal fracture. In North American archeology the term chert occasionally is still used for various siliceous minerals (including flint) that have a conchoidal fracture; this leads to confusion between the terms flint and chert in some archeology texts.

— Wiktionary

Snaplock

Snaplock

A Snaplock is a particular type of mechanism for firing a gun. A snaplock ignites the weapon's propellant by means of sparks produced when a spring-powered cock strikes a flint down on to a piece of hardened steel. The snaplock is therefore similar to the snaphaunce and the later flintlock. In all snaplocks, the flint is held in a clamp at the end of a bent lever called the cock. When the gun is "cocked", the cock is held back, against the pressure of a spring, by a catch which is part of the trigger mechanism. When the trigger is pulled, the catch is released and the spring moves the cock rapidly forwards. The flint strikes a curved plate of hardened steel, called the "steel". The flint strikes from the steel a shower of white hot steel shavings which fall towards the priming powder held in the flash pan. The flash from the pan's ignited primer travels through the touch hole into the firing chamber at the rear of the barrel, and ignites the main charge of gunpowder. Before the weapon is fired, the pan has a closed cover: the mechanism for opening this cover can affect whether the weapon is classed as a snaplock. In fact, the term Snaplock may be used in three ways

— Freebase

flintlock

flintlock

an obsolete gunlock that has flint embedded in the hammer; the flint makes a spark that ignites the charge

— Princeton's WordNet

eCullet

eCullet

eCullet, Inc., a technology-based glass processing company, produces and markets glass cullet to glass container manufacturers. It develops and maintains technology and processing systems that engage in removing contaminants and color sorting broken mixed post-consumer glass to produce furnace ready glass cullet that is used by glass container manufacturers to produce new glass containers. The company was founded in 1999 and is based in Palo Alto, California with processing facilities in Oakland, California; and Seattle, Washington.

— CrunchBase

Avoyel

Avoyel

The Avoyel or Avoyelles were a small Native American tribe who at the time of European contact inhabited land near the mouth of the Red River at its confluence with the Atchafalaya River near present-day Marksville, Louisiana. Also called variously Shi'xkaltī'ni (Stone-Arrow-Point people) in Tunican and Tassenocogoula, Tassenogoula, Toux Enongogoula, and Tasånåk Okla in the Mobilian trade language; all names (including the autonym Avoyel) are said by early French chroniclers to mean either "Flint People" or "People of the Rocks". This is thought to either reflect their active trading of flint for tools from local sources on their land in the eponymously named modern Avoyelles Parish or more likely as their status as middlemen in trading flint from Caddoan peoples to their north to the stone deficit Atakapa and Chitimacha peoples of the Gulf Coast.The Avoyel were also known by the French as the petits Taensas (English: Little Taensa), who were mentioned in writings by explorer Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville in 1699. But they are a different group than the Natchezan speaking Taensa or grand Taensas.

— Wikipedia

Sequoia Gigantea

Sequoia Gigantea

Sequoia is a tree that resembles a huge arrow with a red point of Flint —Quay As in Quiviera “Quay-Vi-ra”. The destination for Coronado at the Flint Hills of Kansas near Wichita

— Editors Contribution

Gun

Gun

gun, n. a firearm or weapon, from which balls or other projectiles are discharged, usually by means of gunpowder—now generally applied to cannon: one who carries a gun, a member of a shooting-party.—v.i. (Amer.) to shoot with a gun.—ns. Gun′-barr′el, the barrel or tube of a gun; Gun′boat, a boat or small vessel of light draught, fitted to carry one or more guns; Gun′-carr′iage, a carriage on which a gun or cannon is supported; Gun′-cott′on, an explosive prepared by saturating cotton with nitric acid; Gun′-fire (mil.), the hour at which the morning or evening gun is fired; Gun′-flint, a piece of flint fitted to the hammer of a flint-lock musket; Gun′-met′al, an alloy of copper and tin in the proportion of 9 to 1, used in making guns; Gun′nage, the number of guns carried by a ship of war; Gun′ner, one who works a gun or cannon: (naut.) a petty officer who has charge of the ordnance on board ship; Gun′nery, the art of managing guns, or the science of artillery; Gun′ning, shooting game; Gun′-port, a port-hole; Gun′powder, an explosive powder used for guns and firearms; Gun′-room, the apartment on board ship occupied by the gunner, or by the lieutenants as a mess-room; Gun′shot, the distance to which shot can be thrown from a gun.—adj. caused by the shot of a gun.—adj. Gun′-shy, frightened by guns (of a sporting dog).—ns. Gun′smith, a smith or workman who makes or repairs guns or small-arms; Gun′stick, a ramrod; Gun′stock, the stock or piece of wood on which the barrel of a gun is fixed; Gun′stone (Shak.), a stone, formerly used as shot for a gun; Gun′-tack′le (naut.), the tackle used on board ship by which the guns are run to and from the port-holes; Gun′-wad, a wad for a gun; Gat′ling-gun, a revolving battery-gun, invented by R. J. Gatling about 1861, usually having ten parallel barrels, capable of firing 1200 shots a minute; Machine′-gun (see Machine).—As sure as a gun, quite sure, certainly; Blow great guns, to blow tempestuously—of wind; Great gun, a cannon: (coll.) a person of great importance; Son of a gun, a rogue, rascal. [M. E. gonne, from W. gwn, a bowl, a gun, acc. to Skeat.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Flint

Flint

Flint is the mobile payments company that is creating the easiest way for on-the-go businesses to accept credit cards and to find new customers through social marketing. The company's first product is an iPhone app that enables merchants to process credit card payments easily and securely using only their phone - without any additional hardware. Founded in 2011 and headquartered in Redwood City, California, Flint is backed by top-tier venture capital firms Storm Ventures and True Ventures.

— CrunchBase

Flint corn

Flint corn

Flint corn, is the same species as, but a different variant of maize. Because each kernel has a hard outer layer to protect the soft endosperm, it is likened to being hard as flint; hence the name. With less soft starch than dent corn, flint corn does not have the dents in each kernel from which dent corn gets its name. This is one of the three types of corn cultivated by Native Americans, both in New England and across the northern tier, including by tribes such as the Pawnee on the Great Plains. Archeologists have found evidence of such corn cultivation by the Pawnee and others since at least 1250 AD. Cultivation of corn occurred hundreds of years earlier among the Mississippian culture people, whose civilization arose based on population density and trade because of surplus corn crops.

— Freebase

Flint

Flint

Flint is a hard, sedimentary cryptocrystalline form of the mineral quartz, categorized as a variety of chert. It occurs chiefly as nodules and masses in sedimentary rocks, such as chalks and limestones. Inside the nodule, flint is usually dark grey, black, green, white, or brown in colour, and often has a glassy or waxy appearance. A thin layer on the outside of the nodules is usually different in colour, typically white and rough in texture. From a petrological point of view, "flint" refers specifically to the form of chert which occurs in chalk or marly limestone. Similarly, "common chert" occurs in limestone.

— Freebase

Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

The Chattahoochee River forms the southern half of the Alabama and Georgia border, as well as a portion of the Florida border. It is a tributary of the Apalachicola River, a relatively short river formed by the confluence of the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers and emptying from Florida into Apalachicola Bay in the Gulf of Mexico. The Chattahoochee River is about 430 miles long. The Chattahoochee, Flint, and Apalachicola Rivers together make up the Apalachiacola–Chattahoochee–Flint River Basin. The Chattahoochee makes up the largest part of the ACF's drainage basin.

— Freebase

Ferrocerium

Ferrocerium

Ferrocerium is a man-made metallic material that gives off a large number of hot sparks at temperatures at 3,000 °F when scraped against a rough surface, such as ridged steel. Because of this property it is used in many applications, such as clockwork toys, strikers for welding torches, so-called "flint-and-steel" or "flint spark lighter" fire-starters in emergency survival kits, and cigarette lighters, as the initial ignition source for the primary fuel. It is also commonly called ferro rod and most commonly of all, mistakenly, flint. As tinder-igniting campfire starter rods it is sold under such trade names as Blastmatch, Fire Steel, and Metal-Match for survivalists and bushcraft hobbyists. Some manufacturers and resellers mistakenly call them "magnesium" rods. It is also known in Europe as Auermetall after its inventor Baron Carl Auer von Welsbach.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "spread out"?
  • A. concentrated
  • B. dissipate
  • C. circularise
  • D. unfold