Synonyms containing form 10-k

We've found 49,268 synonyms:

Form

Form

form, n. shape of a body: the boundary-line of an object: a model: a mould: mode of being: mode of arrangement: order: regularity: system, as of government: beauty or elegance: established practice: ceremony: fitness or efficiency for any undertaking: a blank schedule to be filled in with details: a specimen document to be copied or imitated: (phil.) the inherent nature of an object, that which the mind itself contributes as the condition of knowing, that in which the essence of a thing consists: (print.) the type from which an impression is to be taken arranged and secured in a chase—often Forme:—(in the fol. senses pron. fōrm), a long seat, a bench: the pupils on a form, a class: the bed of a hare, which takes its shape from the animal's body.—v.t. to give form or shape to: to make: to contrive: to settle, as an opinion: to combine: to go to make up: to establish: (gram.) to make by derivation.—v.i. to assume a form.—adj. Form′al, according to form or established mode: ceremonious, punctilious, methodical: having the form only: (Shak.) embodied in a form: having the power of making a thing what it is: essential: proper.—v.t. and v.i. Form′alise.—ns. Form′alism, excessive observance of form or conventional usage, esp. in religion: stiffness of manner; Form′alist, one having exaggerated regard to rules or established usages; Formal′ity, the precise observance of forms or ceremonies: established order: sacrifice of substance to form.—adv. Form′ally.—n. Formā′tion, a making or producing: structure: (geol.) a group of strata of one period.—adj. Form′ative, giving form, determining, moulding: (gram.) inflectional, serving to form, not radical.—n. a derivative.—p.adj. Formed, trained, mature.—n. Form′er.—adj. Form′less, shapeless.—Formal logic (see Logic).—Good, or Bad, form, according to good social usage, or the opposite; Take form, to assume a definite appearance. [O. Fr. forme—L. forma, shape.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spacebikini

Spacebikini

Spacebikini is a social networking comic strip collective, offering a space for indie comic artists at all levels to share their work while using social funding to let fans support the artists.The site will give artists access to tools for creating sellable and tradable digital swag (virtual gold) to their supporting fan base. Fans will earn points through participation in the community and can buy points in order to support artists and get their hands on virtual goods.Through cross-readership the site will help promote various genres of digital illustrations from illustrative journals to daily strips. Through the sharing of eyes the viewers gain access to more entertainment opportunities while the artists have a chance to gain new fans. Each click does make an artist happy, so cross readership helps supports the karma of each artist’s passion.The collective has selected digital illustrations as its first form of entertainment offering. The illustrative narrative is a great communication form for both creator and audience. For the audience this form allows the viewers’ imagination to more of a participant in the medium. And this form can inspire a viewer to pick a pen and paper and doodle-out their own ideas and submit the to the community, their is no bounding line between creator and participant. For the artists this form is an achievable consistent daily or consistent weekly goal. The sites developing tools for aggregation will help artists reach beyond their current local audience and into the contemporary digital marketplace.To the artists in the community the company offers angel funding opportunities in the form of editorial picks and other theme-related opportunities.

— CrunchBase

Jordan normal form

Jordan normal form

In linear algebra, a Jordan normal form, also known as a Jordan canonical form or JCF, is an upper triangular matrix of a particular form called a Jordan matrix representing a linear operator on a finite-dimensional vector space with respect to some basis. Such a matrix has each non-zero off-diagonal entry equal to 1, immediately above the main diagonal (on the superdiagonal), and with identical diagonal entries to the left and below them. Let V be a vector space over a field K. Then a basis with respect to which the matrix has the required form exists if and only if all eigenvalues of the matrix lie in K, or equivalently if the characteristic polynomial of the operator splits into linear factors over K. This condition is always satisfied if K is algebraically closed (for instance, if it is the field of complex numbers). The diagonal entries of the normal form are the eigenvalues (of the operator), and the number of times each eigenvalue occurs is called the algebraic multiplicity of the eigenvalue.If the operator is originally given by a square matrix M, then its Jordan normal form is also called the Jordan normal form of M. Any square matrix has a Jordan normal form if the field of coefficients is extended to one containing all the eigenvalues of the matrix. In spite of its name, the normal form for a given M is not entirely unique, as it is a block diagonal matrix formed of Jordan blocks, the order of which is not fixed; it is conventional to group blocks for the same eigenvalue together, but no ordering is imposed among the eigenvalues, nor among the blocks for a given eigenvalue, although the latter could for instance be ordered by weakly decreasing size.The Jordan–Chevalley decomposition is particularly simple with respect to a basis for which the operator takes its Jordan normal form. The diagonal form for diagonalizable matrices, for instance normal matrices, is a special case of the Jordan normal form.The Jordan normal form is named after Camille Jordan, who first stated the Jordan decomposition theorem in 1870.

— Wikipedia

Re-form

Re-form

to give a new form to; to form anew; to take form again, or to take a new form; as, to re-form the line after a charge

— Webster Dictionary

Formula

Formula

form′ū-la, n. a prescribed form: a formal statement of doctrines: (math.) a general expression for solving problems: (chem.) a set of symbols expressing the components of a body:—pl. Formulæ (form′ū-lē), Form′ulas.—adjs. Form′ular, Formularis′tic.—ns. Formularisā′tion, Formulā′tion; Form′ulary, a formula: a book of formulæ or precedents.—adj. prescribed: ritual.—vs.t. Form′ulāte, Form′ulise, to reduce to or express in a formula: to state or express in a clear or definite form. [L., dim. of forma.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Form 10-K

Form 10-K

A Form 10-K is an annual report required by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), that gives a comprehensive summary of a company's financial performance. Although similarly named, the annual report on Form 10-K is distinct from the often glossy "annual report to shareholders," which a company must send to its shareholders when it holds an annual meeting to elect directors (though some companies combine the annual report and the 10-K into one document). The 10-K includes information such as company history, organizational structure, executive compensation, equity, subsidiaries, and audited financial statements, among other information. Companies with more than $10 million in assets and a class of equity securities that is held by more than 2000 owners must file annual and other periodic reports, regardless of whether the securities are publicly or privately traded. Up until March 16, 2009, smaller companies could use Form 10-KSB. If a shareholder requests a company's Form 10-K, the company must provide a copy. In addition, most large companies must disclose on Form 10-K whether the company makes its periodic and current reports available, free of charge, on its website. Form 10-K, as well as other SEC filings may be searched at the EDGAR database on the SEC's website. In addition to the 10-K, which is filed annually, a company is also required to file quarterly reports on Form 10-Q. Information for the final quarter of a firm's fiscal year is included in the annual 10-K, so only three 10-Q filings are made each year. In the period between these filings, and in case of a significant event, such as a CEO departing or bankruptcy, a Form 8-K must be filed in order to provide up to date information. The name of the Form 10-K comes from the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) designation of the form pursuant to sections 13 and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as amended.

— Wikipedia

Shape

Shape

shāp, v.t. to form: to fashion: to adapt to a purpose: to regulate: to direct: to conceive.—v.i. (Shak.) to take shape, to become fit:—pa.p. shāped, (B.) shāp′en.n. form or figure: external appearance: that which has form or figure: an appearance: particular nature: expression, as in words: a pattern: (cook.) a dish of rice, jelly, or the like cast in a mould and turned out when it has grown firm.—adjs. Shā′pable, Shape′able; Shaped, having a varied ornamental form; Shape′less, having no shape or regular form: (Shak.) effecting nothing.—ns. Shape′lessness; Shape′liness.—adj. Shape′ly, having shape or regular form: symmetrical.—ns. Shā′per, a metal planing machine, the tool with reciprocating motion; Shā′ping, representation, imagination.—Take shape, to assume a definite form or plan. [A.S. sceapan, scapan, to form, make; Ice. skapa, Ger. schaffen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Liturgy

Liturgy

is sometimes used as including any form of public worship, but more strictly it denotes the form for the observance of the Eucharist. As development from the simple form of their institution in the primitive Church liturgies assumed various forms, and only by degrees certain marked types began to prevail: viz., the Roman, ascribed to St. Peter, in Latin, and prevailing in the Roman Catholic Church all over the world; the Ephesian, ascribed to St. John, in corrupt Latin, included the old Scottish and Irish forms, heard now only in a few places in Spain; the Jerusalem, ascribed to St. James, in Greek, the form of the Greek Church and in translation of the Armenians; the Babylonian, ascribed to St. Thomas, in Syriac, used still by the Nestorians and Christians of St. Thomas; and the Alexandrian, ascribed to St. Mark, in a Græco-Coptic jargon, in use among the Copts; these all contain certain common elements, but differ in order and in subsidiary parts; the Anglican liturgy is adapted from the Roman; other Protestant liturgies or forms of service are mostly of modern date and compiled from Scripture sources.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Conform

Conform

kon-form′, v.t. to make like or of the same form with: to adapt.—v.i. to be of the same form; to comply: to obey.—n. Conformabil′ity, state of being conformable.—adj. Conform′able, corresponding in form: suitable: compliant.—adv. Conform′ably.—ns. Conformā′tion, particular form, shape, or structure: adaptation; Conform′er, Conform′ist, one who conforms, esp. with the worship of the Established Church; Conform′ity, likeness: compliance: consistency.—In conformity with, in accordance with. [L. conformārecon, with, and formāreforma, form.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Figure

Figure

fig′ūr, n. the form of anything in outline: the representation of anything in drawing, &c.: a drawing: a design: a statue: appearance: a character denoting a number: value or price: (rhet.) a deviation from the ordinary mode of expression, in which words are changed from their literal signification or usage: (logic) the form of a syllogism with respect to the position of the middle term: steps in a dance: a type or emblem.—v.t. to form or shape: to make an image of: to mark with figures or designs: to imagine: to symbolise: to foreshow: to note by figures.—v.i. to make figures: to appear as a distinguished person.—n. Figurabil′ity, the quality of being figurable.—adjs. Fig′urable; Fig′ural, represented by figure.—n. Fig′urante, a ballet dancer, one of those dancers who dance in troops, and form a background for the solo dancers:—masc. Fig′urant.—adj. Fig′urate, of a certain determinate form: (mus.) florid.—n. Figurā′tion, act of giving figure or form: (mus.) mixture of chords and discords.—adj. Fig′urative (rhet.), representing by, containing, or abounding in figures: metaphorical: flowery: typical.—adv. Fig′uratively.—ns. Fig′urativeness, state of being figurative; Fig′ure-cast′er, an astrologer; Fig′ure-cast′ing, the art of preparing casts of animal or other forms.—adj. Fig′ured, marked or adorned with figures.—ns. Fig′ure-dance, a dance consisting of elaborate figures; Fig′urehead, the figure or bust under the bowsprit of a ship; Fig′ure-weav′ing, the weaving of figured fancy fabrics; Fig′urine, a small carved or sculptured figure, often specially such as are adorned with painting and gilding; Fig′urist, one who uses or interprets figures.—Figurate numbers, any series of numbers beginning with unity, and so formed that if each be subtracted from the following, and the series so formed be treated in the same way, by a continuation of the process, equal differences will be obtained. [Fr.,—L. figura, fingĕre, to form.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Inform

Inform

in-form′, v.t. to give form to: to animate or give life to: to impart knowledge to: to tell: (Milt.) to direct.—v.i. (Shak.) to take shape or form: to give information (with against or on).—adj. Inform′al, not in proper form: irregular.—n. Informal′ity.—adv. Inform′ally.—ns. Inform′ant, one who informs or gives intelligence; Informā′tion, intelligence given: knowledge: an accusation given to a magistrate or court.—adjs. Inform′ative, having power to form: instructive; Inform′atory, instructive; Informed′ (Spens.), unformed: (astron.) of stars not included within the figures of any of the ancient constellations.—n. Inform′er, one who informs against another. [O. Fr.,—L. informārein, into, formāre, to form.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Platform

Platform

plat′form, n. a raised level surface: a part of a floor raised above the rest to form a standing-place for speakers, workmen, &c.: (mil.) an elevated floor for cannon: a statement of principles to which a body of men declare their adhesion, and on which they act: (Shak.) a scheme, plan.—v.t. (Milt.) to sketch, plan: (Mrs Browning) to support as on a platform.—ns. Plat′form-bridge (Amer.), a movable gangway between the platforms of two railway carriages; Plat′form-car, a railway car open all round and without a roof; Plat′form-crane, a crane used on a railway platform, or one mounted on a movable truck; Plat′form-scale, a weighing-machine with a flat surface for holding the thing to be weighed.—The platform, the function of public oratory. [Fr. plate-forme, 'flat form.']

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

haematite

hematite, haematite

the principal form of iron ore; consists of ferric oxide in crystalline form; occurs in a red earthy form

— Princeton's WordNet

hematite

hematite, haematite

the principal form of iron ore; consists of ferric oxide in crystalline form; occurs in a red earthy form

— Princeton's WordNet

port of bar

port of bar

An accumulated shoal or bank of sand, shingle, gravel, or other uliginous substances, thrown up by the sea to the mouth of a river or harbour, so as to endanger, and sometimes totally prevent, the navigation into it.--Bars of rivers are some shifting and some permanent. The position of the bar of any river may commonly be guessed by attending to the form of the shores at the embouchure. The shore on which the deposition of sediment is going on will be flat, whilst the opposite one is steep. It is along the side of the latter that the deepest channel of the river lies; and in the line of this channel, but without the points that form the mouth of the river, will be the bar. If both the shores are of the same nature, which seldom happens, the bar will lie opposite the middle of the channel. Rivers in general have what may be deemed a bar, in respect of the depth of the channel within, although it may not rise high enough to impede the navigation--for the increased deposition that takes place when the current slackens, through the want of declivity, and of shores to retain it, must necessarily form a bank. Bars of small rivers may be deepened by means of stockades to confine the river current, and prolong it beyond the natural points of the river's mouth. They operate to remove the place of deposition further out, and into deeper water. Bars, however, act as breakwaters in most instances, and consequently secure smooth water within them. The deposit in all curvilinear or serpentine rivers will always be found at the point opposite to the curve into which the ebb strikes and rebounds, deepening the hollow and depositing on the tongue. Therefore if it be deemed advisable to change the position of a bar, it may be in some cases aided by works projected on the last curve sea-ward. By such means a parallel canal may be forced which will admit vessels under the cover of the bar.--Bar, a boom formed of huge trees, or spars lashed together, moored transversely across a port, to prevent entrance or egress.--Bar, the short bits of bar-iron, about half a pound each, used as the medium of traffic on the Negro coast.--Bar-harbour, one which, from a bar at its entrance, cannot admit ships of great burden, or can only do so at high-water.--Capstan-bars, large thick bars put into the holes of the drumhead of the capstan, by which it is turned round, they working as horizontal radial levers.--Hatch-bars, flat iron bars to lock over the hatches for security from theft, &c.--Port-bar, a piece of wood or iron variously fitted to secure a gun-port when shut.--Bar-shallow, a term sometimes applied to a portion of a bar with less water on it than on other parts of the bar.--Bar-shot, two half balls joined together by a bar of iron, for cutting and destroying spars and rigging. When whole balls are thus fitted they are more properly double-headed shot.--To bar. To secure the lower-deck ports, as above.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. callow
  • B. experient
  • C. unpracticed
  • D. new