Synonyms containing free-to-use

We've found 33,214 synonyms:

Free

Free

frē, adj. not bound: at liberty: not under arbitrary government: unimpeded: set at liberty: guiltless: frank: lavish: not attached: exempt (with from): having a franchise (with of): gratuitous: bold, indecent: idiomatic, as a translation.—v.t. to set at liberty: to deliver from what confines: to rid (with from, of):—pr.p. free′ing; pa.p. freed.—ns. Free′-ag′ency, state or power of acting freely, or without necessity or constraint upon the will; Free′-ag′ent; Free′-and-eas′y, a kind of public-house club where good fellows gather to smoke and sing; Free′-bench, a widow's right to dower out of her husband's lands, so long as unmarried and chaste; Free′-board, the space between a vessel's line of flotation and the upper side of the deck; Free′booter (Dut. vrijbuiter), one who roves about freely in search of booty: a plunderer; Free′bootery.—adj. Free′booting, acting the part of a freebooter: robbing.—n. the practice of a freebooter: robbery, pillage.—n. Free′booty.—adj. Free′born, born of free parents.—ns. Free′-cit′y, a city having independent government; Free′-cost, freedom from charges; Freed′man, a man who has been a slave, and has been freed or set free; Free′dom, liberty: frankness: separation: privileges connected with a city: improper familiarity: license; Free′-fish′er, one who has a right to take fish in certain waters.—adjs. Free-foot′ed (Shak.) not restrained in movement; Free′-hand, applied to drawing by the unguided hand; Free′-hand′ed, open-handed: liberal; Free′-heart′ed, open-hearted: liberal.—ns. Free′-heart′edness, liberality: frankness; Free′hold, a property held free of duty except to the king; Free′holder, one who possesses a freehold; Free′-lā′bour, voluntary, not slave, labour; Free′-lance, one of certain roving companies of knights and men-at-arms, who after the Crusades wandered about Europe, selling their services to any one; Free′-liv′er, one who freely indulges his appetite for eating and drinking: a glutton; Free′-love, the claim to freedom in sexual relations, unshackled by marriage or obligation to aliment.—adv. Free′ly.—ns. Free′man, a man who is free or enjoys liberty: one who holds a particular franchise or privilege:—pl. Free′men; Free′māson, one of a secret society of so-called speculative masons, united in lodges for social enjoyment and mutual assistance, and laying dubious claim to a connection with the medieval organisations of free operative masons.—adj. Freemason′ic.&mda

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Use

Use

ūs, n. act of using or putting to a purpose: convenience: employment: need: advantage: practice: common occurrence: a distinctive form of public worship or service peculiar to a church, diocese, &c.: custom: interest for money.—n. Us′ance (obs.), use, usage, employment: (Shak.) usury, interest for money: the time allowed by usage for the payment of a bill of exchange.—adj. Use′ful, full of use or advantage: able to do good: serviceable.—adv. Use′fully.—n. Use′fulness.—adj. Use′less, having no use: answering no good purpose or the end proposed.—adv. Use′lessly.—n. Use′lessness.—n.pl. Us′es, a form of equitable ownership peculiar to English law by which one person enjoys the profits of lands, &c., the legal title to which is vested in another in trust.—Use and wont, the customary practice.—Have no use for (U.S.), to have no liking for; In use, in employment or practice; Made use of, to use, to employ; Of no use, useless; Of use, useful; Out of use, not used or employed. [L. ususuti.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Free time

Free time

Free time is a type of musical meter free from musical time and time signature. It is used when a piece of music has no discernible beat. Instead, the rhythm is intuitive and free-flowing. In standard musical notation, there are five ways in which a piece is indicated to be in free time: ⁕There is simply no time signature displayed. This is common in old vocal music such as Gaelic psalms. ⁕There is no time signature but the direction 'Free time' is written above the stave. ⁕There is a time signature and the direction 'Free time' written above. ⁕The word FREE is written downwards across the stave. This is mostly used when the piece changes to free time after having had a time signature. ⁕Instead of a time signature, a large X is written on the stave. Examples of musical genres based around free time include free improvisation, free jazz and noise music. Examples of music written in free time include Erik Satie's Gnossienne No. 1, Charles Ives' Concord Sonata, and most of Kaikhosru Shapurji Sorabji's music. Examples of contemporary songs in free time include "Hunting Bears" by Radiohead and the latter half of "21st Century Schizoid Man" by King Crimson. The usage of free time is almost absent in popular music. The Allman Brothers Band was known for occasionally dropping into free time segments on their lengthy live jams. The most famous example can be found on "Whipping Post" on the live album At Fillmore East. The band drops into a lengthy free time at the 10 minute mark, before coming back into 12/8 time about 5 and half minutes later. They drop into free time again at the 17:15 mark and continue to the end of the song at about 23:00.

— Freebase

Richard Stallman

Richard Stallman

Richard Matthew Stallman (; born March 16, 1953), often known by his initials, rms, and occasionally upper-case RMS, is an American free software movement activist and programmer. He campaigns for software to be distributed in a manner such that its users receive the freedoms to use, study, distribute, and modify that software. Software that ensures these freedoms is termed free software. Stallman launched the GNU Project, founded the Free Software Foundation, developed the GNU Compiler Collection and GNU Emacs, and wrote the GNU General Public License. Stallman launched the GNU Project in September 1983 to create a Unix-like computer operating system composed entirely of free software. With this, he also launched the free software movement. He has been the GNU project's lead architect and organizer, and developed a number of pieces of widely used GNU software including, among others, the GNU Compiler Collection, GNU Debugger, and GNU Emacs text editor. In October 1985 he founded the Free Software Foundation (FSF). In September 2019, he resigned as president of the FSF and left his "visiting scientist" role at MIT. Stallman remains head of the GNU Project.Stallman pioneered the concept of copyleft, which uses the principles of copyright law to preserve the right to use, modify, and distribute free software, and is the main author of free software licenses which describe those terms, most notably the GNU General Public License (GPL), the most widely used free software license.In 1989, he co-founded the League for Programming Freedom. Since the mid-1990s, Stallman has spent most of his time advocating for free software, as well as campaigning against software patents, digital rights management (which he referred to as digital restrictions management, calling the more common term misleading), and other legal and technical systems which he sees as taking away users' freedoms. This has included software license agreements, non-disclosure agreements, activation keys, dongles, copy restriction, proprietary formats, and binary executables without source code.

— Wikipedia

Free will

Free will

Free will is the ability of agents to make choices unconstrained by certain factors. Factors of historical concern have included metaphysical constraints, physical constraints, social constraints, and mental constraints. The principle of free will has religious, legal, ethical, and scientific implications. For example, in the religious realm, free will implies that individual will and choices can coexist with an omnipotent divinity. In the law, it affects considerations of punishment and rehabilitation. In ethics, it may hold implications for whether individuals can be held morally accountable for their actions. In science, neuroscientific findings regarding free will may suggest different ways of predicting human behavior. This important issue has been widely debated throughout history, including not only whether free will exists but even how to define the concept. Historically, the constraint of dominant concern has been determinism of some variety, so the most prominent common positions are named for the relation they hold to exist between free will and determinism. Those who define free will as freedom from determinism are called incompatibilists, as they hold determinism to be incompatible with free will. The two main incompatibilist positions are metaphysical libertarianism, the claim that determinism is false and thus free will is at least possible; and hard determinism, the claim that determinism is true and thus free will is not possible. Hard incompatibilism posits that indeterminism is also incompatible with free will, and thus either way free will is not possible.

— Freebase

Anarchistic free school

Anarchistic free school

An anarchistic free school is a decentralized network in which skills, information, and knowledge are shared without hierarchy or the institutional environment of formal schooling. Free school students may be adults, children, or both. This organisational structure is distinct from ones used by democratic free schools which permit children's individual initiatives and learning endeavors within the context of a school democracy, and from free education where 'traditional' schooling is made available to pupils without charge. The open structure of free schools is intended to encourage self-reliance, critical consciousness, and personal development. Free schools often operate outside the market economy in favor of a gift economy. Nevertheless, the meaning of the "free" of free schools is not restricted to monetary cost, and can refer to an emphasis on free speech and student-centred education. Free schools have their roots in the anarchist Escuela Moderna of Spain in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They are, at heart, non-institutional, non-authoritarian, and counter-cultural. Generally, these are formed at a grassroots level by a group of individuals acting collectively and autonomously to create educational opportunities and promote skill-sharing within their communities. For example, the Anarchist Free School in Toronto was described as "a volunteer-run, autonomous collective offering free courses, workshops, and lectures."

— Freebase

Vem

Vem

The VEM (Acronym of Vale eletrônico Metropolitano, Electronic Metropolitan Ticket) is a Smart card system used in bus, train and metro of the metropolitan area of Recife, Brazil. The VEM cards operate by using contactless technology as they have an internal chip that communicates with the validator by RFID.Since 11 of June 2014, All credits in VEM card has a validity of 180 days. There are many types of the Vem Card: "Trabalhador" (worker) Green color: is the standard and most issued version, with more than million and half issued cards. This card complies with Brazilian "vale transporte" rules, meaning that the credit is paid by the company that the user works and can only be used by that user in their house to work ride and vice versa, being impossible use the same card twice in a same ride, also there is a daily use limit of 8 rides. The card credit is paid by companies using a web-based application and the card is recharged during its normal use in Buses or Metro after 48 hours the credit is paid by the company. The use and balance of this type of card can be checked using a web-based application. The card is printed with the user name and its CPF. the worker card can also carry "comum" credit type. "Comum" (common) Green color: This is the standard card for non-worker users. It can be obtained by free by any user, as no data of the user is printed on card, however, the first charge is fixed in R$25,00. It can be purchased/recharged only with cash at the VEM site located at Rua da Soledade 259, Boa vista without any fares or at any reseller by adding a convenience fare of 2,5% of the recharge (it is deducted of the charge). How those sellers act as a resellers, often them can not recharge the card because all their "stock of credit" were sold. There is no discount in fare by using this card, except in the case you use interchange train-buses or buses-buses in some very specific lines. How this card is not linked to any law or rule, you can use it how many times you want until the card have credit, also if the card is lost, is impossible to retrieve its credit, as it are not linked to any CPF. the worker card can carry "common" credit type, meaning that is not necessary to buy another card if you have a worked card, you just need to add funds to it. Since June 2014, with the opening of BRT stations, the use of a VEM card is mandatory in the BRT system. The common card can be purchased in BRT Stations by R$4,00. "Estudante" (student) Yellow color: It is granted for almost any student whose school is located within Recife Metropolitan Area (only some exceptions apply) and it deducts only half of the fare. The card is printed with the photo of the user, and after its use, you need to show your student ID card to have your access authorized. In future, the fingerprint will be needed to be presented to certify that is the user that are using the card. To obtain and recharge it, riders need to get a student card and some documents of your school proof of student status. This card can not be used in special services like air conditioned buses, and have a daily limit of 8 uses and a monthly limit of 60 rides. "Rodoviário" (Bus driver) white color: used by bus drivers and fare collector to operate the system and to obtain free ride. the card has the worker photo and can only be used by them, in future, fingerprint will be needed during its use for free rides. "Infantil" (for children) fully colored with drawings: for children under six who cannot go through the turnstiles."Livre Acesso": Blue or Orange color: This card grants access by free in public transport for people with some disability. The blue version is for people that not need a helper to travel, the orange is for who need the helper, granting the free ride for them, too. This card has the user photo printed and can only be used by its user. In future, fingerprint will be needed to be presented. Due Brazilian law, There are no limits for using those cards. "Idoso" (elderly) Red color: Still Not Released. "Vem Jaboatão": The city of Jaboatão dos Guararapes are not part of Grande Recife transport consortium, so it can not use the metropolitan VEM in its municipal micro-buses, so a new VEM needed to be created. It is not compatible with the metropolitan version.

— Wikipedia

Use

Use

to make use of; to convert to one's service; to avail one's self of; to employ; to put a purpose; as, to use a plow; to use a chair; to use time; to use flour for food; to use water for irrigation

— Webster Dictionary

free software

free software

As defined by Richard M. Stallman and used by the Free Software movement, this means software that gives users enough freedom to be used by the free software community. Specifically, users must be free to modify the software for their private use, and free to redistribute it either with or without modifications, either commercially or noncommercially, either gratis or charging a distribution fee. Free software has existed since the dawn of computing; Free Software as a movement began in 1984 with the GNU Project.RMS observes that the English word “free” can refer either to liberty (where it means the same as the Spanish or French “libre”) or to price (where it means the same as the Spanish “gratis” or French “gratuit”). RMS and other people associated with the FSF like to explain the word “free” in “free software” by saying “Free as in speech, not as in beer.”See also open source. Hard-core proponents of the term “free software” sometimes reject this newer term, claiming that the style of argument associated with it ignores or downplays the moral imperative at the heart of free software.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Free party

Free party

A free party is a party "free" from the restrictions of the legal club scene, similar to the free festival movement. It typically involves a sound system playing electronic dance music from late at night until the time when the organisers decide to go home. A free party can be composed of just one system or of many and if the party becomes a festival, it becomes a teknival. The parties can be thought of as autonomous zones where all the people present create and enforce the rules. This typically means that drugs are readily available and noise levels are usually illegally high. The word free in this context is used both to describe the entry fee and the lack of restrictions and law enforcement. Motivations for organisers range from political protest to simply wanting to have fun. An example of free parties as political protest was their prominence during the M11 link road protest. At most parties no money is asked for entrance since the aim is not to make profit. However, at some (most often indoor) events it is requested at the door to make a donation to cover costs. Typically organisers make little profit or make a loss setting them up. The term free party is used more widely in Europe than in the US. In Canada and some parts of Europe they are also referred to as Freetekno parties. A free party might have once been described as a rave, and the origins of the two are similar. Since the birth of nightclubs in town centres in Europe the use of the word rave had largely fallen out of fashion, however in recent times it is increasingly being used again. The term squat party defines the free parties with secret indoor locations. The address is obtained on the day of the event personally from organizers as the buildings are squatted. The parties often last over 24 hours.

— Wikipedia

Spontaneous process

Spontaneous process

A spontaneous process is the time-evolution of a system in which it releases free energy and it moves to a lower, more thermodynamically stable energy state. The sign convention for free energy follows the general convention for thermodynamic measurements, in which a release of free energy from the system corresponds to a negative change in the free energy of the system and a positive change in the free energy of the surroundings. Depending on the nature of the process, the free energy is determined differently. For example, the Gibbs free energy is used when considering processes that occur under constant pressure and temperature conditions whereas the Helmholtz free energy is used when considering processes that occur under constant volume and temperature conditions. Because spontaneous processes are characterized by a decrease in the system's free energy, they do not need to be driven by an outside source of energy. For cases involving an isolated system where no energy is exchanged with the surroundings, spontaneous processes are characterized by an increase in entropy.

— Wikipedia

Free education

Free education

Free education is education funded through taxation or charitable organizations rather than tuition funding. Many models of free higher education have been proposed. Primary school and other comprehensive or compulsory education is free in many countries, for example, and all education is mostly free (often not including books (from primary) and a number of administrative and sundry fees in university) including post-graduate studies in the Nordic countries. The Article 13 of International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights ensures the right to free education at primary education and progressive introduction of it at secondary and higher education as the right to education.In University of Oslo, there is no tuition fee except small semester fee of NOK(600) (74 USD). From 2013 in Northern Europe, Estonia started providing free higher education as well. Sweden, until the early 21st century, provided free education to foreign students but changes have been introduced to charge fees to foreign students from outside the European community. Denmark also has universal free education, and provides a monthly stipend, the "Statens Uddannelsesstøtte" or "SU", to students over 18 years of age or students who are under 18 and attending a higher education. Bachelor and master's degree programmes in Denmark are offered in either Danish or English depending on the programme or university. Cuba, Brazil, Czech Republic, Greece, Turkey and Argentina provide free education at all levels, including college and university for its citizens.

— Wikipedia

Free fall

Free fall

In Newtonian physics, free fall is any motion of a body where its weight is the only force acting upon it. In the context of General Relativity where gravitation is reduced to a space-time curvature, a body in free fall has no force acting on it and it moves along a geodesic. The present article concerns itself with free fall in the Newtonian domain. An object in the technical sense of free fall may not necessarily be falling down in the usual sense of the term. An object moving upwards would not normally be considered to be falling but if it is subject to the force of gravity only, it is said to be in free fall. The moon thus is in free fall. In a uniform gravitational field, in the absence of any other forces, gravitation acts on each part of the body equally and this is akin to weightlessness, a condition which also obtains when the gravitational field is zero such as when far away from any gravitating body. A body in free fall experiences "0-g". The term "free fall" is often used more loosely than in the strict sense defined above. Thus, falling through an atmosphere without a deployed parachute, or lifting device, is also often referred to as free fall. The aerodynamic drag forces in such situations prevent them from producing full weightlessness, and thus a skydiver's "free fall" after reaching terminal velocity produces the sensation of the body's weight being supported on a cushion of air.

— Freebase

Free product

Free product

In mathematics, specifically group theory, the free product is an operation that takes two groups G and H and constructs a new group G ∗ H. The result contains both G and H as subgroups, is generated by the elements of these subgroups, and is the “most general” group having these properties. Unless one of the groups G and H is trivial, the free product is always infinite. The construction of a free product is similar in spirit to the construction of a free group. The free product is the coproduct in the category of groups. Somewhat unintuitively, however, the free product is not the coproduct in the category of abelian groups. That is, the free product plays the same role in group theory that disjoint union plays in set theory, or that the direct sum plays in module theory. The free product is important in algebraic topology because of van Kampen's theorem, which states that the fundamental group of the union of two path-connected topological spaces is always an amalgamated free product of the fundamental groups of the spaces. In particular, the fundamental group of the wedge sum of two spaces is simply the free product of the fundamental groups of the spaces.

— Freebase

GNU General Public License

GNU General Public License

The GNU General Public License is the most widely used free software license, which guarantees end users the freedoms to use, study, share, and modify the software. Software that ensures that these rights are retained is called free software. The license was originally written by Richard Stallman of the Free Software Foundation for the GNU project. The GPL grants the recipients of a computer program the rights of the Free Software Definition and uses copyleft to ensure the freedoms are preserved whenever the work is distributed, even when the work is changed or added to. The GPL is a copyleft license, which means that derived works can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD licenses are the standard examples. GPL was the first copyleft license for general use. As of August 2007, the GPL accounted for nearly 65% of the 43,442 free software projects listed on Freecode, and as of January 2006, about 68% of the projects listed on SourceForge.net. Similarly, a 2001 survey of Red Hat Linux 7.1 found that 50% of the source code was licensed under the GPL and a 1997 survey of MetaLab, then the largest free software archive, showed that the GPL accounted for about half of the software licensed therein. Prominent free software programs licensed under the GPL include the Linux kernel and the GNU Compiler Collection. Some other free software programs are dual-licensed under multiple licenses, often with one of the licenses being the GPL.

— Freebase

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. refuse
  • B. decline
  • C. admit
  • D. reject