Synonyms containing gall dang

We've found 251 synonyms:

Oak apple

Oak apple

Oak apple is the common name for a large, round, vaguely apple-like gall commonly found on many species of oak. Oak apples range in size from 2–5 cm in diameter and are caused by chemicals injected by the larva of certain kinds of gall wasp in the family Cynipidae. The adult female wasp lays single eggs in developing leaf buds. The wasp larvae feed on the gall tissue resulting from their secretions. Considerable confusion exists in the general 'literature' between the oak apple and the oak marble gall. The oak marble is frequently called the oak apple due to the superficial resemblance and the preponderance of the oak marble gall in the wild. Other galls found on oak trees include the Oak artichoke gall and the Acorn cup gall, but each of these has its own distinctive form. Some common oak-apple-forming species are the Biorhiza pallida gall wasp in Europe; Amphibolips confluenta in eastern North America,; and Atrusca bella in western North America. Oak apples may be brownish, yellowish, greenish, pinkish or reddish.

— Freebase

Gall

Gall

gawl, n. a light nut-like ball which certain insects produce on the oak-tree, used in dyeing—also Gall′-nut.—v.t. to fret or hurt the skin by rubbing: to annoy: to enrage.—v.i. (Shak.) to act in a galling manner.—ns. Gall′ate, a salt of gallic acid; Gall′fly, an insect which occasions gall on plants by puncturing.—adj. Gall′ing, irritating.—adv. Gall′ingly.—Gallic acid, a crystalline substance obtained from gall-nuts, and used in making ink. [Fr. galle—L. galla, oak-apple.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

St. Gallen

St. Gallen

St. Gallen or traditionally St Gall, in German sometimes Sankt Gallen (Sankt Gallen ; English: St Gall; French: Saint-Gall; Italian: San Gallo; Romansh: Son Gagl) is a Swiss town and the capital of the canton of St. Gallen. It evolved from the hermitage of Saint Gall, founded in the 7th century. Today, it is a large urban agglomeration (with around 160,000 inhabitants) and represents the center of eastern Switzerland. Its economy consists mainly of the service sector. Internationally, the town is known as the home of the University of St. Gallen. The main tourist attraction is the Abbey of Saint Gall, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Abbey's renowned library contains books from the 9th century. The official language of St. Gallen is (the Swiss variety of Standard) German, but the main spoken language is the local variant of the Alemannic Swiss German dialect. The city has good transport links to the rest of the country and to neighbouring Germany and Austria. It also functions as the gate to the Appenzellerland.

— Wikipedia

Dangui

Dangui

Dang'ui (Korean pronunciation: [tɐŋɰi]) is a type of upper garment for women in hanbok, Korean traditional clothing, which was worn for ceremonial occasions during the Joseon Dynasty. It was worn as a simple official outfit or for small national ceremonies while court ladies wore it as a daily garment. Dangui was also called dang-jeogori (당저고리), dang-jeoksam (당적삼), or dang-hansam (당한삼).

— Wikipedia

Gall

Gall

gawl, n. the greenish-yellow fluid secreted from the liver, called bile: bitterness: malignity.—ns. Gall-bladd′er, a pear-shaped bag lying on the under side of the liver, a reservoir for the bile; Gall′-stone, a hard concretion in the gall-bladder or biliary ducts.—Gall and wormwood, anything extremely disagreeable and annoying.—In the gall of bitterness, in a state of extreme hostility to God (Acts, viii. 23). [A.S. gealla, gall; cf. Ger. galle, Gr. cholē, L. fel.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gallows

Gallows

gal′us, n. a wooden frame on which criminals are executed by hanging—a pl. used as a sing., and having (Shak.) the double pl. 'gallowses' (used also coll. originally for a pair of braces for supporting the trousers): (Shak.) a wretch who deserves the gallows: any contrivance with posts and cross-beam for suspending objects: a rest for the tympan of a hand printing-press: the main frame of a beam-engine.—ns. Gall′ows-bird, a person who deserves hanging; Gall′ows-bitts, a frame fixed in a ship's deck to support spare spars.—adj. Gall′ows-free, free from danger of hanging.—n. Gall′owsness (slang), recklessness.—adj. Gall′ows-ripe, ready for the gallows.—n. Gall′ows-tree, a tree used as a gallows.—Cheat the gallows, to escape hanging though deserving it. [M. E. galwes (pl.)—A.S. galga; Ger. galgen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cassytha filiformis

Cassytha filiformis

Cassytha filiformis, common name love-vine, is a species of obligate parasitic vine in the family Lauraceae. The species has a native pantropical distribution encompassing the Americas, Indomalaya, Australasia, Polynesia and tropical Africa In the Caribbean region, it is one of several plants known as "Love vine" because it has a reputation as an aphrodisiac.Cassytha filiformis is a twining vine with an orange to pale green stem. Leaves are reduced to scales about 1 mm long. Flowers are borne in spikes or sometimes solitary. There are six tepals, each 0.1-2.0 mm long. Fruit is a drupe about 7 mm in diameter.The 1889 book 'The Useful Native Plants of Australia records that the "This and other species of Cassytha are called " Dodder-laurel." The emphatic name of "Devil's guts" is largely used. It frequently connects bushes and trees by cords, and becomes a nuisance to the traveller. "This plant is used by the Brahmins of Southern India for seasoning their buttermilk. (Treasury of Botany?)".A 2018 study revealed how a southern Florida subspecies of this widespread species has developed a complex form of carnivorous plant behaviour. New tendrils will actively seek out galls made by the gall wasp, Belonocnema treatae, on leaves of a host oak tree, Quercus geminata. Once its haustoria -- the parasitic growth that infects its host -- penetrates the gall, the larvae shrivel as this parasitic plant drains both the gall and its inhabitant. In the study , other species of plant and gall wasp become parasitised by this plant in the southern Florida area too.

— Wikipedia

Inquiline

Inquiline

In zoology, an inquiline is an animal that lives commensally in the nest, burrow, or dwelling place of an animal of another species. For example, some organisms such as insects may live in the homes of gophers and feed on debris, fungi, roots, etc. The most widely distributed types of inquiline are those found in association with the nests of social insects, especially ants and termites – a single colony may support dozens of different inquiline species. The distinctions between parasites, social parasites, and inquilines are subtle, and many species may fulfill the criteria for more than one of these, as inquilines do exhibit many of the same characteristics of parasites. However, parasites are specifically not inquilines, because by definition they have a deleterious effect on the host species, while inquilines do not. Examples of the inquiline relation are known especially among the gall wasps. In the sub-family Synerginae this mode of life predominates. These insects differ but little in structure from the true gall-inducing wasps, but they cannot produce galls and consequently deposit their eggs within those of other species. They infest certain species of galls, such as those of the blackberry and some oak galls, in large numbers, and sometimes more than one kind occur in a single gall. Perhaps the most remarkable feature of these inquilines is their frequent close resemblance to the insect that produces the gall they infest.

— Freebase

Cecidomyiidae

Cecidomyiidae

Cecidomyiidae is a family of flies known as gall midges or gall gnats. As the name implies, the larvae of most gall midges feed within plant tissue, creating abnormal plant growths called galls. Cecidomyiidae are very fragile small insects usually only 2–3 mm in length; many are less than 1 mm long. They are characterised by hairy wings, unusual in the order Diptera, and have long antennae. More than 3000 species are found worldwide, but since 1,100 are from well-studied North America, this may be an underestimate. Many are economically significant especially the Hessian fly, a wheat pest, as the galls cause severe damage. Other important pests of this family are the lentil flower midge, the lucerne flower midge and the alfalfa sprout midge on the Leguminosae; the swede midge and the brassica pod midge on the Cruciferae; the pear midge and the raspberry cane midge on fruit crops; and the rosette gall midge on goldenrod stalks. A large number of species are natural enemies of other crop pests. Their larvae are predaceous, and some are even reported as parasitoids. The most common are aphids and spider mites, followed by scale insects, then other small prey such as whiteflies and thrips, which eat the eggs of other insects or mites. As the larvae are incapable of moving considerable distances, a substantial population of prey must be present before the adults will lay eggs, and Cecidiomyiidae are most frequently be seen during pest outbreaks. One species, Aphidoletes aphidomyza, is an important component of biological control programs for greenhouse crops and is widely sold in the United States of America.

— Freebase

Gallic

Gallic

gal′ik, adj. pertaining to Gaul or France.—adj. Gall′ican, of or pertaining to France: esp. pertaining to the Roman Catholic Church in France.—n. one holding Gallican doctrines.—n. Gall′icanism, the spirit of nationalism within the French Church—as opposed to Ultramontanism, or the absolute subjection of everything to the personal authority of the pope.—adv. Gallice (gal′i-sē), in French.—n. Gall′icism, the use in English or any other language of a word or idiom peculiar to the French.—vs.t. Gall′icīze, Gall′icīse, to make French in opinions, habits, &c. [L. GallicusGallia, Gaul.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Iron gall ink

Iron gall ink

Iron gall ink (also known as common ink, standard ink, oak gall ink or iron gall nut ink) is a purple-black or brown-black ink made from iron salts and tannic acids from vegetable sources. It was the standard ink formulation used in Europe for the fourteen-hundred year period between the 5th and 19th centuries, remained in widespread use well into the 20th century, and is still sold today.

— Wikipedia

Ox gall

Ox gall

Ox gall is gall, usually obtained from cows, that is mixed with alcohol and used as the wetting agent in paper marbling, engraving, lithography, and watercolor painting. It is a greenish-brown liquid mixture containing cholesterol, lecithin, taurocholic acid, and glycocholic acid. http://www.winsornewton.com/news/making-water-thick-or-thin-gum-arabic-and-ox-gall http://www.neogen.com/acumedia/pdf/ProdInfo/7216_PI.pdf http://www.usbio.net/item/O8175

— Freebase

Ahwa

Ahwa

Ahwa is the headquarters of Dang District in the state of Gujarat, in India. It is situated about 1800 feet above the sea level. The whole district, inhabited by the tribal people, is a hilly area covered with thick forest. Poisonous snakes from here are sent to the Haffkine Institute, Bombay, for preparing injections.Ahwa was selected as the headquarter of the Dang by James Outram before 1857.

— Wikipedia

Gaddang

Gaddang

Gaddang or Ga'dang may be, Gaddang people Gaddang language Ga'dang language

— Wikipedia

Cup-gall

Cup-gall

a kind of oak-leaf gall. See Gall

— Webster Dictionary

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. certain
  • B. dicey
  • C. iffy
  • D. chancy