Synonyms containing gauge-cocks

We've found 458 synonyms:

American wire gauge

American wire gauge

American wire gauge, also known as the Brown & Sharpe wire gauge, is a standardized wire gauge system used since 1857 predominantly in the United States and Canada for the diameters of round, solid, nonferrous, electrically conducting wire. The cross-sectional area of each gauge is an important factor for determining its current-carrying capacity. The steel industry does not use AWG and prefers a number of other wire gauges. These include Washburn & Moen Wire Gauge, US Steel Wire Gauge, and Music Wire Gauge. Increasing gauge numbers give decreasing wire diameters, which is similar to many other non-metric gauging systems. This gauge system originated in the number of drawing operations used to produce a given gauge of wire. Very fine wire required more passes through the drawing dies than did 0 gauge wire. Manufacturers of wire formerly had proprietary wire gauge systems; the development of standardized wire gauges rationalized selection of wire for a particular purpose. The AWG tables are for a single, solid, round conductor. The AWG of a stranded wire is determined by the total cross-sectional area of the conductor, which determines its current-carrying capacity and electrical resistance. Because there are also small gaps between the strands, a stranded wire will always have a slightly larger overall diameter than a solid wire with the same AWG.

— Freebase

Height gauge

Height gauge

A height gauge is a measuring device used for determining the height of objects, and for marking of items to be worked on. These measuring tools are used in metalworking or metrology to either set or measure vertical distances; the pointer is sharpened to allow it to act as a scriber and assist in marking out work pieces. Devices similar in concept, with lower resolutions, are used in health care settings (health clinics, surgeries) to find the height of people, in which context they are called stadiometers. Height gauges may also be used to measure the height of an object by using the underside of the scriber as the datum. The datum may be permanently fixed or the height gauge may have provision to adjust the scale, this is done by sliding the scale vertically along the body of the height gauge by turning a fine feed screw at the top of the gauge; then with the scriber set to the same level as the base, the scale can be matched to it. This adjustment allows different scribers or probes to be used, as well as adjusting for any errors in a damaged or resharpened probe. In the toolroom, the distinction between a height gauge and a surface gauge is that a height gauge has a measuring head (whether vernier, fine rack and pinion with dial, or linear encoder with digital display), whereas a surface gauge has only a scriber point. Both are typically used on a surface plate and have a heavy base with an accurately flat, smooth underside.

— Wikipedia

Russian gauge

Russian gauge

In railway terminology, Russian gauge refers to railway track with a gauge between 1,520 mm and 1,524 mm. In a narrow sense as defined by Russian Railways it refers to 1,520 mm gauge. The primary installed base of Russian gauge is across the states of the former Soviet Union, also Mongolia and Finland, representing ca. 225,000 km of track. The Russian gauge is the second most widely used gauge in the world—after 1,435 mm. Comparatively short sections of Russian-gauge railways also extend beyond the borders of the former USSR, Mongolia and Finland into Poland, eastern Slovakia, Sweden, and northern Afghanistan. There is an approximately 150 km long section in Hungary in the Záhony logistics area close to the Ukrainian border.

— Freebase

Track gauge

Track gauge

In rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue. As the dominant parameter determining interoperability, it is still frequently used as a descriptor of a route or network. There is a distinction between the nominal gauge and actual gauge at some locality, due to divergence of track components from the nominal. Railway engineers use a device, like a caliper, to measure the actual gauge, and this device is also referred to as a track gauge.

— Freebase

Cock

Cock

kok, n. the male of birds, particularly of the domestic fowl: the time of cock-crowing: a weathercock: a plucky chap, a term of familiarity, as 'Old cock:' a strutting chief or leader: anything set erect: a tap for liquor: part of the lock of a gun, held back by a spring, which, when released by the trigger, produces the discharge.—v.t. to set erect or upright: to set up, as the hat: to draw back the cock of a gun: to turn up to one side: to tilt up knowingly, inquiringly, or scornfully.—v.i. to strut: to swagger.—ns. Cockāde′, a knot of ribbons or something similar worn on the hat as a badge; Cockalō′rum, a bumptious little person: a boy's game; Cock′-broth, the broth made from a boiled cock; Cock′chafer, the May-bug, an insect of a pitchy-black colour, most destructive to vegetation; Cock′-crow, -ing, early morning, the time at which cocks crow.—adj. Cocked, set erect: turned up at one side.—ns. Cock′er, one who follows cock-fighting: a small dog of the spaniel kind employed by sportsmen in pheasant and woodcock shooting; Cock′erel, a young cock: a young man—also Cock′le, whence Cock′le-brained, foolish; Cock′-eye, a squinting eye: the loop by which a trace is attached to the whipple-tree.—adj. Cock′-eyed.—ns. Cock′-fight, -ing, a fight or contest between game-cocks: a fight; Cock′-horse, a child's rocking-horse.—adj. prancing, proud.—adv. properly a-cock-horse = on cock-horse, on horseback: exultingly.—ns. Cock′laird (Scot.), a yeoman; Cock′loft, the room in a house next the roof; Cock′-match, a cock-fight; Cock′pit, a pit or enclosed space where game-cocks fought: a room in a ship-of-war for the wounded during an action; Cock′roach, the common black beetle; Cocks′comb, the comb or crest on a cock's head: a fop: the name of various plants; Cock′shut (Shak.), twilight, probably referring to the time when poultry are shut up; Cock′-shy, a free throw at a thing, as for amusement.—adj. Cock′-sure, quite sure, often without cause.—n. Cock′swain (see Coxswain).—adjs. Cock′sy, Cox′y, bumptious.—n. Cock′tail, a racing horse that is not thoroughbred: one who apes the gentleman: (U.S.) a drink of spirits flavoured with various ingredients.—adjs. Cock′tailed, having the tail cocked or tilted up; Cock′y, impudent.—ns. Cock′y-leek′y, soup made of a fowl boiled with leeks; Cock′yolly, a nursery or pet name for a bird.—Cock-a-doodle-doo, the cry of the cock; Cock-a-hoop, a phrase expressing reckless exultation; Cock and pie, used as an exclamation (see Pie, 2); Cocked ha

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Structure gauge

Structure gauge

The structure gauge, also called the minimum clearance outline, is the minimum height and width of tunnels and bridges as well as the minimum height and width of the doors that allow a rail siding access into a warehouse. In addition, the term may apply to the minimum distance to railway platforms (passenger or freight), buildings, electrical equipment boxes, railway signal equipment, third rails or to supports for overhead lines from the track. The width of a narrow cut can also affect the maximum loading gauge. The difference between the structure gauge and the loading gauge is called the "clearance". The amount of clearance between the loading gauge and the structure gauge depends on the speed of the train, due to the train wobbling, so a train may be able to get past a restricted clearance by travelling at slow speed. The term can also be applied to the minimum size of road tunnels, overpasses and bridges, as well as doors into automobile repair shops, bus garages, filling stations, residential garages, multi-storey car parks and warehouses.

— Wikipedia

Depth gauge

Depth gauge

A depth gauge is a pressure gauge that displays the equivalent depth in water. It is a piece of diving equipment often used by SCUBA divers. Most modern diving depth gauges have an electronic mechanism and digital display. Older types used a mechanical mechanism and analogue display. A diver uses a depth gauge with decompression tables and a watch to avoid decompression sickness. A common alternative to the depth gauge, watch and decompression tables is a dive computer. A depth gauge and an oxygen analyser/oxygen sensor can be used to measure the partial pressure of oxygen of the breathing gas, which is necessary to avoid oxygen toxicity. Digital depth gauges commonly also include a timer showing the interval of time that the diver has been submerged. Some show the diver's rate of ascent and descent, which can be is useful for avoiding barotrauma. As the gauge only measures water pressure, there is an inherent inaccuracy in the depth displayed by gauges that are used in both fresh water and seawater due to the difference in the densities of fresh water and seawater.

— Freebase

Cockfight

Cockfight

A cockfight is a blood sport between two roosters, or more accurately gamecocks, held in a ring called a cockpit. The first documented use of the word gamecock, denoting use of the cock as to a “game”, a sport, pastime or entertainment, was recorded in 1646, after the term “cock of the game” used by George Wilson, in the earliest known book on the sport of cockfighting in The Commendation of Cocks and Cock Fighting in 1607. The combatants, referred to as gamecocks, are specially bred birds, conditioned for increased stamina and strength. The comb and wattle are cut off in order to meet show standards of the American Gamefowl Society and the Old English Game Club and to prevent freezing in colder climates. Cocks possess congenital aggression toward all males of the same species. Cocks are given the best of care until near the age of two years old. They are conditioned, much like professional athletes prior to events or shows. Wagers are often made on the outcome of the match

— Freebase

Gauge

Gauge

Gage, gāj, n. a measuring-rod: a standard of measure: estimate.—v.t. to measure the contents of any vessel: to estimate ability.—adj. Gauge′able, capable of being gauged.—ns. Gaug′er, an excise officer whose business is to gauge or measure the contents of casks; Gaug′ing, the art of measuring casks containing excisable liquors; Gaug′ing-rod, an instrument for measuring the contents of casks; Broad′-, Narr′ow-gauge, in railroad construction, a distance between the rails greater or less than 56½ inches, called standard gauge. [O. Fr. gauge (Fr. jauge), gauger; prob. related to jale, bowl, to galon, gallon, or to jalon, measuring stake.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

en-Gauge

en-Gauge

en-Gauge technology makes people safer. They produce monitoring solutions for safety equipment that results in lower costs and increased life safety. There solutions keep schools, government and private organizations compliant with codes and ready to respond to emergencies, all while optimizing management time and resources. en-Gauge insures inspections are always done and equipment is where you need it, when you need it. Whether your needs are fire, security or health care, en-Gauge can help. en-Gauge has deployed its patented monitoring system in airports, hospitals college campuses, businesses and government facilities throughout the globe.

— CrunchBase

Center gauge

Center gauge

Center gauges and fishtail gauges are gauges used in lathe work for checking the angles when grinding the profiles of single-point screw-cutting tool bits and centers. In the image, the gauge on the left is called a fishtail gauge or center gauge, and the one on the right is another style of center gauge. These gauges are most commonly used when hand-grinding threading tool bits on a bench grinder, although they may be used with tool and cutter grinders. When the tool bit has been ground to the correct angle, they are then be used to set the tool perpendicular to the workpiece. They can incorporate a range of sizes and types on the one gauge, the two most common being metric or UNC and UNF at 60°, and BSW at 55°. Gauges also exist for the Acme thread form.

— Wikipedia

Sheet metal

Sheet metal

Sheet metal is metal formed into thin and flat pieces. It is one of the fundamental forms used in metalworking and can be cut and bent into a variety of different shapes. Countless everyday objects are constructed with sheet metal. Thicknesses can vary significantly; extremely thin thicknesses are considered foil or leaf, and pieces thicker than 6 mm are considered plate. Sheet metal is available in flat pieces or as a coiled strip. The coils are formed by running a continuous sheet of metal through a roll slitter. The thickness of the sheet metal is commonly specified by a traditional, non-linear measure known as its gauge. The larger the gauge number, the thinner the metal. Commonly used steel sheet metal ranges from 30 gauge to about 8 gauge. Gauge differs between Ferrous metals and nonferrous metals such as aluminum or copper; Copper is measured in thickness by Ounce. There are many different metals that can be made into sheet metal, such as aluminum, brass, copper, steel, tin, nickel and titanium. For decorative uses, important sheet metals include silver, gold, and platinum Sheet metal also has applications in car bodies, airplane wings, medical tables, roofs for buildings and many other things. Sheet metal of iron and other materials with high magnetic permeability, also known as laminated steel cores, has applications in transformers and electric machines. Historically, an important use of sheet metal was in plate armor worn by cavalry, and sheet metal continues to have many decorative uses, including in horse tack. Sheet metal workers are also known as "tin bashers", which is derived from the hammering of panel seams when installing tin roofs.

— Freebase

Gauge

Gauge

The gauge of a firearm is a unit of measurement used to express the diameter of the barrel. Gauge is determined from the weight of a solid sphere of lead that will fit the bore of the firearm, and is expressed as the multiplicative inverse of the sphere's weight as a fraction of a pound. Thus there are twelve 12-gauge balls per pound. The term is related to the measurement of cannon, which were also measured by the weight of their iron round shot; an 8 pounder would fire an 8 lb spherical cast iron ball and had a bore diameter of about 91 mm. Gauge is commonly used today in reference to shotguns, though historically it was also used in large double rifles, which were made in sizes up to 4 bore during their heyday in the 1880s, being originally loaded with black powder cartridges. These very large rifles, sometimes called elephant guns, were intended for use in India and Africa for hunting dangerous game. Gauge is abbreviated "ga.", "ga", or "G". The space between the number and the abbreviation is often left out, as in "12ga".

— Freebase

1 gauge

1 gauge

Gauge 1 is a model railroading and toy train standard, popular in the early 20th century, particularly with European manufacturers. Its track measures 1.75 in, making it larger than 0 gauge but slightly smaller than wide gauge, which came to be the dominant U.S. standard during the 1920s. No 1 gauge was standardised, according to Model Railways and Locomotive magazine of August 1909 at 1.75 in . The distance between the wheel tyres at 1+17⁄32 in and between the centre of the track 48 mm. The wheel width was set at 19⁄64 in. Definitions using gauge, rather than scale, was used more common in the early days with the four gauges for which standards were adopted being No. 0, No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3.

— Freebase

Standard gauge

Standard gauge

The standard gauge is a widely-used railway track gauge. Approximately 60% of the world's existing railway lines are built to this gauge. Except for Russia and Finland, all high-speed lines have been built to this gauge. The distance between the inside edges of the rails of standard gauge track is usually called 1,435 mm but in the United States it is still called 4 ft 8 ¹⁄2 in.

— Freebase

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An antonym for the term "ductile"
  • A. malleable
  • B. pliable
  • C. intractable
  • D. fictile