Synonyms containing get into ones stride

We've found 49,427 synonyms:

Cavaletti

Cavaletti

Cavaletti (also spelled cavalletti, singular (rarely used in English) cavaletto) (Italian: "little horse") are small jumps, originally made of wood, used for basic horse training. Most consist of rails that are about 4 inches (10 cm) wide, and 10 feet (3.0 m) long. The rails are inserted into fixed standards, usually made in an "X" shape, that commonly are designed to be placed at one of three preset heights ranging from a few inches off the ground to a maximum of about 18 to 24 inches (46 to 61 cm). However, in informal terminology, even ground rails without standards are sometimes called "cavaletti." Modern designs can be made from various types of molded plastic and PVC pipe as well as wood. They can be used both for ground training with the handler working a horse on a longe line or at liberty, or while a rider is mounted on the horse. Cavaletti are used by practitioners of both English riding and western riding. Similar obstacles of lighter weight materials are used with dogs in dog agility and canine physical therapy. Cavaletti were invented by Federico Caprilli and designed to help a horse improve its balance, adjust its length of stride, and to loosen and strengthen its muscles. They are often used in sets of at least four to six placed in a row, but have nearly unlimited ways they can be configured. Used at their lowest placement as ground rails or at a level no more than about 12 inches (30 cm) high, they can be set to encourage a proper length of stride. By being set closer or farther apart than a horse's natural stride, they encourage lengthening or shortening of the stride. Used as a "gymnastic" in conjunction with other horse jumping obstacles in a training ring, they help teach the horse how to approach a fence at the proper rate of speed and length of stride. Set at higher settings, they become small jumps to introduce young horses or beginning riders to jumping. Some designs can safely be stacked, allowing fences up to about 2.5 feet (0.76 m). Spaced as ground rails between 3 and 3.5 feet (0.91 and 1.07 m) apart, cavaletti encourage a horse maintain a shorter stride at a trot or jog, spaced farther apart, a row of cavaletti encourage a longer, more extended trot stride. Beginning at approximately 6 to 7 feet (1.8 to 2.1 m) apart, they encourage a slow canter or lope and spaced at intervals of 9 to 12 feet (2.7 to 3.7 m), depending on the size and stride of the individual horse, they help regulate a horse's proper pace as it approaches or departs from a jumping obstacle. In modern use, cavaletti are used not only for training, but also in some types of horse show competition such as trail horse classes for western riders, and very basic beginning jumper classes. They are not only used as jumps or ground rails, but can also be used to define corridors for training exercises or in trail horse or driving classes. There are potential safety issues associated with cavaletti. The standards need to be designed to be a compromise that will be stable if lightly struck by a horse's leg or hoof, yet move or give way if tripped over or hit with force. Standards need to be designed so that a horse cannot catch a leg in the "X" standard if they attempt to evade or run out on the cavaletti. Cavaletti not designed to be stacked could fall in a dangerous manner if stacked and then knocked down. Edges of standards should be squared or rounded in a manner to avoid presenting sharp edges if struck by a horse or a falling rider.

— Wikipedia

Get

Get

get, v.t. to obtain: to seize: to procure or cause to be: to beget offspring: to learn: to persuade: (B.) to betake, to carry.—v.i. to arrive or put one's self in any place, state, or condition: to become:—pr.p. get′ting; pa.t. got; pa.p. got, (obs.) got′ten.ns. Get′ter, one who gets or obtains: one who begets; Get′ting, a gaining: anything gained: procreation; Get′-up, equipment: general appearance.—Get ahead, along, to make progress, advance; Get at, to reach, attain; Get off, to escape; Get on, to proceed, advance; Get out, to produce: to go away; Get over, to surmount; Get round, to circumvent: to persuade, talk over; Get through, to finish; Get up, to arise, to ascend: to arrange, prepare. [A.S. gitan, to get.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

cavalry and artillery horse

cavalry and artillery horse

Horses generally make in a minute, at ordinary pace, 120 steps, and they cover 110 yards; at a trot, 180 steps, covering 220 yards; and at a gallop, 100 steps or strides, covering 352 yards; from which it would appear that the length of the stride at the ordinary pace is about 0.917 yard, and that the velocity corresponds to about 1.74 yards per second; and at a trot the stride is about 1.28 yards and the speed about 3.68 yards per second; and at a gallop the stride is about 3.52 yards, with a speed of about 5.87 yards per second. A good horse carrying a weight of 225 pounds, can travel, without over-exertion, 25 miles in a day of from seven to eight hours; his speed in this case would be between 1.75 and 1.53 yards per second. The weight of an average-sized horse is about from 900 to 1350 pounds. The age of the horse is determined by the appearance of the teeth, which vary according to the number of years the animal has attained, and may be easily understood by a slight attention to the subject; the number, quality, and size of the teeth indicating the respective ages. The lower front teeth or nippers are those by which the age of a colt is usually determined. At two years old these teeth will be complete; that is to say, the colt will have a full set, six in number, of milch-teeth. Between two and three years old the two centre teeth are displaced, and two permanent teeth succeed them, easily distinguished from colt’s teeth by being broader, larger, and having a dark cavity in the centre of the upper surface. At three years old the colt will have in the lower jaw two permanent and four colt’s teeth; between the third and fourth year the next pair of incisor teeth will be shed, and permanent teeth succeed them. At four years old there will be four permanent teeth in the centre, and two colt’s teeth at each corner of the lower jaw. Between the fourth and fifth year the last remaining colt’s nipper, or corner tooth, will be cast; and, if a horse or gelding, the tushes, four in number, will show themselves, two in the upper and two in the lower jaw. At five years old the horse will have a full or complete set of permanent teeth in the upper and lower jaws; for the same change that takes place in the lower is developed in the upper jaw also. The colt at this age takes the name of horse, and is supposed to be equal to all the laborious duties expected from him. Although we can no longer judge of his age by the shifting or shedding of his teeth, we can form a tolerably correct conclusion from other appearances of them. At six years old the dark oval-shaped mark in the centre of the two front nippers, usually called by horsemen “the bean,” will be nearly or quite worn away; the tushes higher and stronger, and the cavities of the interior part of the tooth more filled; the two corner nippers level with the others, and equally developed. At seven years old the marks in the second pair of nippers are filled up, and the tushes become more round externally and internally. At eight years old the marks in the corner nippers are worn out, and the tushes more round and blunt. From this age the animal is said to be, in horse phraseology, “past knowledge”; and although a tolerably correct opinion may be formed for many years to come by the appearance of the upper jaw and other prognostics, still they cannot be implicitly relied on. It often occurs at a much earlier period that the best judges of age are deceived by the untimely structural alteration of the teeth, produced by mechanical or pathological causes, such as crib-biting, biting the rack or manger, eating hard food, etc. Horses used for cavalry in the United States are selected with regard to climate, the American horse east of the Rocky Mountains, and what is known as the Mexican or bronco, west of the Rocky Mountains; the power of endurance of the latter being much more than that of the former, they are better adapted to the rugged, arid country that an American cavalry soldier has to travel over on the western frontier. For artillery large, strong American horses are used. A horse occupies a space in the ranks of a front of 40 inches, a depth of 10 feet; in a stall, from 31⁄2 to 41⁄2 feet front; at picket 3 feet by 9. Cavalry horses usually charge at the rate of 24 miles per hour, or one mile in 21⁄2 minutes. See Pack and Draught Horses.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Get

Get

to arrive at, or bring one's self into, a state, condition, or position; to come to be; to become; -- with a following adjective or past participle belonging to the subject of the verb; as, to get sober; to get awake; to get beaten; to get elected

— Webster Dictionary

plunged

plunged

to (cause someone or something to) move or fall suddenly and often a long way forward, down, or into something;to become lower in value or level very suddenly and quickly;a sudden movement or fall forward, down, or into something;a sudden and large fall in value or level;to move or fall suddenly forward, down, or into something;If a value or price plunges, it suddenly becomes less;If a person or group plunges into an activity, or a place plunges into a condition, it suddenly experiences it;If you plunge into an activity or are plunged into it, you suddenly get very involved in it.If a person or thing is plunged into a particular state or situation, or if they plunge into it, they are suddenly in that state or situation.If you plunge an object into something, you push it quickly or violently into it.to fall quickly from a high position:To move, or to move something downwards:fall,lower,come down;to make someone or something fall quickly from a high position;to slope downwards suddenly; if an amount or level plunges, it suddenly becomes much lower; to move quickly in an uncontrolled way, or to make someone or something move in this way; to suddenly put someone or something in a much less successful situation, or to be suddenly put in such a situation;to cause to penetrate or enter quickly and forcibly into something; to cause to enter a state or course of action usually suddenly, unexpectedly, or violently ; to thrust or cast oneself into or as if into water;to become pitched or thrown headlong or violently forward and downward,to move oneself in such a manner,to descend or dip suddenly.dive, pitch, sound.

— Editors Contribution

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— Editors Contribution

Into

Into

indicating the passing of a thing from one form, condition, or state to another; as, compound substances may be resolved into others which are more simple; ice is convertible into water, and water into vapor; men are more easily drawn than forced into compliance; we may reduce many distinct substances into one mass; men are led by evidence into belief of truth, and are often enticed into the commission of crimes'into; she burst into tears; children are sometimes frightened into fits; all persons are liable to be seduced into error and folly

— Webster Dictionary

Enter

Enter

to get admission; to introduce one's self; to penetrate; to form or constitute a part; to become a partaker or participant; to share; to engage; -- usually with into; sometimes with on or upon; as, a ball enters into the body; water enters into a ship; he enters into the plan; to enter into a quarrel; a merchant enters into partnership with some one; to enter upon another's land; the boy enters on his tenth year; to enter upon a task; lead enters into the composition of pewter

— Webster Dictionary

Harry Gibson

Harry Gibson

Harry "The Hipster" Gibson (June 27, 1915 – May 3, 1991) was a jazz pianist, singer, and songwriter. Gibson played New York style stride piano and boogie woogie while singing in a wild, unrestrained style. His music career began in the late 1920s, when as the young Harry Raab, his birth name, he played stride piano in Dixieland jazz bands in Harlem. He continued to perform there throughout the 1930s, adding the barrelhouse boogie of the time to his repertoire, and was discovered by Fats Waller in 1939 and brought down to mid-town Manhattan, where he made a splash and changed his surname to Gibson. Between 1939 and 1945, he played at Manhattan jazz clubs on 52nd Street ("Swing Street"), most notably the Three Deuces, run by Irving Alexander, and Leon and Eddie's run by Leon Enkin and Eddie Davis. Harry Gibson sings Keep The Beat backed by Abe Lyman and his Orchestra in the film Junior Prom

— Wikipedia

Crease

Crease

In the sport of cricket, the crease is a certain area demarcated by white lines painted or chalked on the field of play. The term crease also refers to any of the lines themselves, particularly the popping crease. Law 9 of the Laws of Cricket governs the size and position of the crease markings. The actual line is considered to be the back edge of the width of the marked line on the grass, i.e., the edge nearest to the wicket at that end. Four creases are drawn at each end of the pitch, around the two sets of stumps. The batsmen generally play in and run between the areas defined by the creases at each end of the pitch. The bowling creases lie 22 yards apart and mark the ends of the pitch, and so may be used to determine whether there is a no ball because a fielder has encroached on the pitch or the wicket-keeper has moved in front of the wicket before they are permitted to do so. Formerly, part of the bowler's back foot in the delivery stride was required to fall behind the bowling crease to avoid a delivery being a no ball. This rule was replaced by a requirement that part of the bowler's front foot in the delivery stride must fall behind the popping crease.

— Freebase

Stride

Stride

Stride is American progressive metal band that formed in Houston in 1996. They currently have three releases including the 2003 album Bah Humbug which is an album of Christmas songs. Stride also played in the ProgPower USA VI music festival.

— Freebase

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— Editors Contribution

rotate

rotate

to replace older materials or to place older materials in front of newer ones so that older ones get used first.

— Wiktionary

Get Carter

Get Carter

Get Carter is a 1971 British crime film directed by Mike Hodges and starring Michael Caine, Ian Hendry, Britt Ekland, John Osborne and Bryan Mosley. The screenplay was adapted by Hodges from Ted Lewis's 1970 novel Jack's Return Home. Producer Michael Klinger optioned the book and made a deal for the ailing Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) studio to finance and release the film, bringing in Hodges and Caine. Caine became a co-producer of the film. Get Carter was Hodges's first feature film as director, as well as being the screen debut of Alun Armstrong. MGM was reducing its European operations and the film became the last project approved before it closed its Borehamwood studios. The film is set in north-east England and was filmed in and around Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead and County Durham. The story follows a London gangster, the eponymous Jack Carter (Caine), who travels back to his home town to discover more about his brother Frank's supposedly accidental death. Suspecting foul play, he investigates and interrogates, regaining a feel for the city and its hardened-criminal element; with vengeance on his mind, the situation builds to a violent conclusion.Caine and Hodges had ambitions to produce a more gritty and realistic portrayal of violence and criminal behaviour than had previously been seen in a British film. Caine incorporated his knowledge of real criminal acquaintances into his characterisation of Carter. Hodges and cinematographer Wolfgang Suschitzky drew heavily on their backgrounds in documentary film. Combined with Hodges' research into the contemporary criminal underworld of Newcastle (in particular the one-armed bandit murder) and the use of hundreds of local bystanders as extras, produced a naturalistic feel in many scenes. The shoot was incident-free and progressed speedily, despite a one-day strike by the Association of Cinematograph, Television and Allied Technicians. The production went from novel to finished film in eight months, with location shooting lasting 40 days. Get Carter suffered in its promotion, firstly from MGM's problems and secondly owing to the declining British film industry of the period, which relied increasingly on US investment. Initial UK critical reaction to the film was mixed, with British reviewers grudgingly appreciative of the film's technical excellence but dismayed by the complex plot, violence and amorality, in particular Carter's apparent lack of remorse at his actions. Despite this the film did good business in the UK and produced a respectable profit. US critics were generally more enthusiastic and praised the film but it was poorly promoted in the US by United Artists and languished on the drive in circuit while MGM focused its resources on producing a blaxploitation version of the same novel, Hit Man. On its release Get Carter received no awards and did not seem likely to be well remembered. It was not available on home media until 1993 but always maintained a cult following. Endorsements from a new generation of directors such as Quentin Tarantino and Guy Ritchie led to a critical reappraisal which saw it recognized as one of the best British movies. In 1999, Get Carter was ranked 16th on the BFI Top 100 British films of the 20th century; five years later, a survey of British film critics in Total Film magazine chose it as the greatest British film. Get Carter was remade in 2000 by Warner Bros. under the same title, with Sylvester Stallone starring as Jack Carter, with Caine in a supporting role. This remake was not well received by critics in the US and was not given a UK theatrical release.

— Wikipedia

Straddle

Straddle

strad′l, v.i. to stride or part the legs wide: to stand or walk with the legs far apart: to seem favourable to both sides in any question that divides opinion into parties, to trim with regard to any controversy.—v.t. to stand or sit astride of.—n. act of straddling: an attempt to fill a non-committal position: a stock-transaction in which the buyer obtains the privilege of either a put or a call: a vertical mine-timber supporting a set.—adv. astride.—adj. Stradd′le-legged, having the legs wide apart. [A freq. from A.S. strǽd, pa.t. of strídan, stride.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. secluded
  • B. secular
  • C. cloistral
  • D. reclusive