Synonyms containing get on like a house on fire

We've found 39,642 synonyms:

Fire

Fire

fīr, n. the heat and light caused by burning: flame: anything burning, as fuel in a grate, &c.: a conflagration: torture or death by burning: severe trial: anything inflaming or provoking: ardour of passion: vigour: brightness of fancy: enthusiasm: sexual passion.—v.t. to set on fire: to inflame: to irritate: to animate: to cause the explosion of: to discharge.—v.i. to take fire: to be or become irritated or inflamed: to discharge firearms.—n. Fire′-alarm′, an alarm of fire, an apparatus for giving such.—n.pl. Fire′arms, arms or weapons which are discharged by fire exploding gunpowder.—ns. Fire′-ar′row, a small iron dart or arrow furnished with a combustible for setting fire to ships; Fire′ball, a ball filled with combustibles to be thrown among enemies: a meteor; Fire′-balloon′, a balloon carrying a fire placed in the lower part for rarefying the air to make itself buoyant: a balloon sent up arranged to ignite at a certain height; Fire′-bas′ket, a portable grate for a bedroom; Fire′-blast, a blast or blight affecting plants, in which they appear as if scorched by the sun; Fire′-boat, a steamboat fitted up to extinguish fires in docks; Fire′box, the box or chamber (usually copper) of a steam-engine, in which the fire is placed; Fire′brand, a brand or piece of wood on fire: one who inflames the passions of others; Fire′brick, a brick so made as to resist the action of fire, used for lining furnaces, &c.; Fire′-brigade′, a brigade or company of men for extinguishing fires or conflagrations; Fire′-buck′et, a bucket for carrying water to extinguish a fire; Fire′clay, a kind of clay, capable of resisting fire, used in making firebricks; Fire′cock, a cock or spout to let out water for extinguishing fires; Fire′damp, a gas, carburetted hydrogen, in coal-mines, apt to take fire and explode when mixed with atmospheric air; Fire′-dog (same as Andiron); Fire′-drake, a fiery meteor, a kind of firework; Fire′-eat′er, a juggler who pretends to eat fire: one given to needless quarrelling, a professed duellist; Fire′-en′gine, an engine or forcing-pump used to extinguish fires with water; Fire′-escape′, a machine used to enable people to escape from fires.—adj. Fire′-eyed (Shak.), having fiery eyes.—ns. Fire′-flag (Coleridge), Fire′flaught (Swinburne), a flash of lightning; Fire′-fly, a name applied to many phosphorescent insects, all included with the Coleoptera or beetles, some giving forth a steady light, others flashing light intermittently (glow-worms, &c.); Fire′-guard, a framework of wire placed in front of a fireplace.—n.pl. Fire′-ī′rons, the irons—poker, tongs, and shovel—used for a fire.—ns. Fire′light′er

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

House

House

hows, n. a building for dwelling in: a dwelling-place: an inn: household affairs: a family: kindred: a trading establishment: one of the twelve divisions of the heavens in astrology: one of the estates of the legislature (House of Lords or Upper House, House of Commons or Lower House; also Upper and Lower Houses of Convocation, House of Representatives, &c.): at Oxford, 'The House,' Christ Church College: the audience at a place of entertainment, a theatre, &c. (a full house, a thin house): (coll.) the workhouse:—pl. Houses (howz′ez).v.t. House (howz), to protect by covering: to shelter: to store: to provide houses for.—v.i. to take shelter: to reside.—ns. House′-ā′gent, one who has the letting of houses; House′-boat, a barge with a deck-cabin that may serve as a dwelling-place; House′-bote, wood that a tenant may take to repair his house, or for fuel; House′-break′er, one who breaks open and enters a house by day for the purpose of stealing; House′-break′ing; House′-carl, a member of a king or noble's bodyguard, in Danish and early English history; House′-dū′ty, -tax, a tax laid on inhabited houses; House′-fac′tor (Scot.), a house-agent; House′-fa′ther, the male head of a household or community; House′-flag, the distinguishing flag of a shipowner or company of such; House′-fly, the common fly universally distributed; House′hold, those who are held together in the same house, and compose a family.—adj. pertaining to the house and family.—ns. House′holder, the holder or tenant of a house; House′keeper, a female servant who keeps or has the chief care of the house: one who stays much at home; House′keeping, the keeping or management of a house or of domestic affairs: hospitality.—adj. domestic.—n. House′-leek, a plant with red star-like flowers and succulent leaves that grows on the roofs of houses.—adj. House′less, without a house or home: having no shelter.—ns. House′-line (naut.), a small line of three strands, for seizings, &c.; House′maid, a maid employed to keep a house clean, &c.; House′-mate, one sharing a house with another; House′-moth′er, the mother of a family, the female head of a family; House′-room, room or place in a house; House′-stew′ard, a steward who manages the household affairs of a great family; House′-sur′geon, the surgeon or medical officer in a hospital who resides in the house—so also House′-physi′cian; House′-warm′ing, an entertainment given when a family enters a new house, as if to warm it; Housewife (hows′wīf, huz′wif, or huz′if), the mistress of a house: a female

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Get

Get

get, v.t. to obtain: to seize: to procure or cause to be: to beget offspring: to learn: to persuade: (B.) to betake, to carry.—v.i. to arrive or put one's self in any place, state, or condition: to become:—pr.p. get′ting; pa.t. got; pa.p. got, (obs.) got′ten.ns. Get′ter, one who gets or obtains: one who begets; Get′ting, a gaining: anything gained: procreation; Get′-up, equipment: general appearance.—Get ahead, along, to make progress, advance; Get at, to reach, attain; Get off, to escape; Get on, to proceed, advance; Get out, to produce: to go away; Get over, to surmount; Get round, to circumvent: to persuade, talk over; Get through, to finish; Get up, to arise, to ascend: to arrange, prepare. [A.S. gitan, to get.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fire pump

Fire pump

A fire pump is a part of a fire sprinkler system's water supply and powered by electric, diesel or steam. The pump intake is either connected to the public underground water supply piping, or a static water source (e.g., tank, reservoir, lake). The pump provides water flow at a higher pressure to the sprinkler system risers and hose standpipes. A fire pump is tested and listed for its use specifically for fire service by a third-party testing and listing agency, such as UL or FM Global. The main code that governs fire pump installations in North America is the National Fire Protection Association's NFPA 20 Standard for the Installation of Stationary Fire Pumps for Fire Protection.Fire pumps function either by an electric motor or a diesel engine, or, occasionally a steam turbine. If the local building code requires power independent of the local electric power grid, a pump using an electric motor may utilize, when connected via a listed transfer switch, the installation of an emergency generator. The fire pump starts when the pressure in the fire sprinkler system drops below a threshold. The sprinkler system pressure drops significantly when one or more fire sprinklers are exposed to heat above their design temperature, and opens, releasing water. Alternately, other fire hoses reels or other firefighting connections are opened, causing a pressure drop in the fire fighting main. Fire pumps are needed when the local municipal water system cannot provide sufficient pressure to meet the hydraulic design requirements of the fire sprinkler system. This usually occurs if the building is very tall, such as in high-rise buildings, or in systems that require a relatively high terminal pressure at the fire sprinkler in order to provide a large volume of water, such as in storage warehouses. Fire pumps are also needed if fire protection water supply is provided from a ground level water storage tank. Types of pumps used for fire service include: horizontal split case, vertical split case, vertical inline, vertical turbine, and end suction.

— Wikipedia

Battalion chief

Battalion chief

A battalion chief is the rank and title of a subordinate fire chief or commanding officer in the firefighting command structure. The title of battalion chief is usually synonymous with firefighting in the United States and Canada. A battalion chief is the lowest chief officer in a fire department's rank structure, above rank-and-file fire station and fire company officers. A battalion chief commands a firefighting battalion, similar to a military battalion. A battalion consists of several fire stations and multiple fire companies. A battalion chief has command over each fire station's officers and each company or unit's officers, as well as the uniformed firefighters. A battalion chief is usually under the command of a division chief, deputy chief, or assistant chief, who in turn reports to a chief of department, chief engineer, or a fire commissioner. Several Fire Departments, including The Detroit Fire Department, The New York City Fire Department, The Chicago Fire Department, The Sacramento Fire Department, CAL FIRE, Philadelphia Fire Department and the Los Angeles County Fire Department all have battalion chiefs in their rank structure. In the Boston Fire Department and the Toronto Fire Services, however, the title of district chief is used in place of battalion chief.

— Wikipedia

Fire safety

Fire safety

Fire safety refers to precautions that are taken to prevent or reduce the likelihood of a fire that may result in death, injury, or property damage, alert those in a structure to the presence of an uncontrolled fire in the event one occurs, better enable those threatened by a fire to survive in and evacuate from affected areas, or to reduce the damage caused by a fire. Fire safety measures include those that are planned during the construction of a building or implemented in structures that are already standing, and those that are taught to occupants of the building. Threats to fire safety are referred to as fire hazards. A fire hazard may include a situation that increases the likelihood a fire may start or may impede escape in the event a fire occurs. Fire safety is often a component of building safety. Those who inspect buildings for violations of the Fire Code and go into schools to educate children on Fire Safety topics are fire department members known as fire prevention officers. The Chief Fire Prevention Officer or Chief of Fire Prevention will normally train newcomers to the Fire Prevention Division and may also conduct inspections or make presentations.

— Freebase

Fire ecology

Fire ecology

Fire ecology is a scientific discipline concerned with natural processes involving fire in an ecosystem and the ecological effects, the interactions between fire and the abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem, and the role as an ecosystem process. Many ecosystems, particularly prairie, savanna, chaparral and coniferous forests, have evolved with fire as an essential contributor to habitat vitality and renewal. Many plant species in fire-affected environments require fire to germinate, establish, or to reproduce. Wildfire suppression not only eliminates these species, but also the animals that depend upon them.Campaigns in the United States have historically molded public opinion to believe that wildfires are always harmful to nature. This view is based on the outdated belief that ecosystems progress toward an equilibrium and that any disturbance, such as fire, disrupts the harmony of nature. More recent ecological research has shown, however, that fire is an integral component in the function and biodiversity of many natural habitats, and that the organisms within these communities have adapted to withstand, and even to exploit, natural wildfire. More generally, fire is now regarded as a 'natural disturbance', similar to flooding, wind-storms, and landslides, that has driven the evolution of species and controls the characteristics of ecosystems.Fire suppression, in combination with other human-caused environmental changes, may have resulted in unforeseen consequences for natural ecosystems. Some large wildfires in the United States have been blamed on years of fire suppression and the continuing expansion of people into fire-adapted ecosystems, but climate change is more likely responsible. Land managers are faced with tough questions regarding how to restore a natural fire regime, but allowing wildfires to burn is the least expensive and likely most effective method.

— Wikipedia

Fire blanket

Fire blanket

A fire blanket is a safety device designed to extinguish incipient (starting) fires. It consists of a sheet of a fire retardant material which is placed over a fire in order to smother it. Small fire blankets, such as for use in kitchens and around the home are usually made of fiberglass and sometimes kevlar, and are folded into a quick-release contraption for ease of storage. Fire blankets, along with fire extinguishers, are fire safety items that can be useful in case of a fire. These nonflammable blankets are helpful in temperatures up to 900 degrees and are useful in smothering fires by not allowing any oxygen to the fire. Due to its simplicity, a fire blanket may be more helpful for someone who is inexperienced with fire extinguishers. Larger fire blankets, for use in laboratory and industrial situations, are often made of wool (sometimes treated with a flame retardant fluid). These blankets are usually mounted in vertical quick-release container so that they can be easily pulled out and wrapped round a person whose clothes are on fire.

— Wikipedia

Xiuhtecuhtli

Xiuhtecuhtli

In Aztec mythology, Xiuhtecuhtli [ʃiʍˈtekʷt͡ɬi] ("Turquoise Lord" or "Lord of Fire"), was the god of fire, day and heat. He was the lord of volcanoes, the personification of life after death, warmth in cold (fire), light in darkness and food during famine. He was also named Cuezaltzin [kʷeˈsaɬt͡sin] ("flame") and Ixcozauhqui [iʃkoˈsaʍki], and is sometimes considered to be the same as Huehueteotl ("Old God"), although Xiuhtecuhtli is usually shown as a young deity. His wife was Chalchiuhtlicue. Xiuhtecuhtli is sometimes considered to be a manifestation of Ometecuhtli, the Lord of Duality, and according to the Florentine Codex Xiuhtecuhtli was considered to be the father of the Gods, who dwelled in the turquoise enclosure in the center of earth. Xiuhtecuhtli-Huehueteotl was one of the oldest and most revered of the indigenous pantheon. The cult of the God of Fire, of the Year, and of Turquoise perhaps began as far back as the middle Preclassic period. Turquoise was the symbolic equivalent of fire for Aztec priests. A small fire was permanently kept alive at the sacred center of every Aztec home in honor of Xiuhtecuhtli.The Nahuatl word xihuitl means "year" as well as "turquoise" and "fire", and Xiuhtecuhtli was also the god of the year and of time. The Lord of the Year concept came from the Aztec belief that Xiuhtecuhtli was the North Star. In the 260-day ritual calendar, the deity was the patron of the day Atl ("Water") and with the trecena 1 Coatl ("1 Snake"). Xiuhtecuhtli was also one of the nine Lords of the Night and ruled the first hour of the night, named Cipactli ("Alligator"). Scholars have long emphasized that this fire deity also has aquatic qualities. Xiuhtecuhtli dwelt inside an enclosure of turquoise stones, fortifying himself with turquoise bird water. He is the god of fire in relation to the cardinal directions, just as the brazier for lighting fire is the center of the house or temple. Xiuhtecuhtli was the patron god of the Aztec emperors, who were regarded as his living embodiment at their enthronement. The deity was also one of the patron gods of the pochteca merchant class.Stone sculptures of Xiuhtecuhtli were ritually buried as offerings, and various statuettes have been recovered during excavations at the Great Temple of Tenochtitlan with which he was closely associated. Statuettes of the deity from the temple depict a seated male with his arms crossed. A sacred fire was always kept burning in the temples of Xiuhtecuhtli. In gratitude for the gift of fire, the first mouthful of food from each meal was flung into the hearth.

— Wikipedia

Fire safety inspector

Fire safety inspector

In the United Kingdom a fire safety inspector (also known as fire officer or fire safety officer) is a public law enforcement officer responsible for the enforcement fire safety legislation in the United Kingdom. As public law enforcement officers, fire inspectors are duty bound, by law, to enforce fire safety legislation in the name of the Chief Fire Officer and the Chair of the Fire Rescue Authority of the Fire & Rescue Authority they are employed by, for the protection of members of the general public. In turn the Chief Fire Officer discharges power of authority by order of a Secretary of State (In England and Wales) or their equivalent in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Fire inspectors, like any other major enforcing officers from other enforcing authorities, have the same powers of authority of that of a police constable except that they cannot arrest persons. They can not, except in the event of fire or emergency, make forceable entry, unless first obtaining a warrant.

— Wikipedia

Danger Room Gaming

Danger Room Gaming

We are very excited to bring to the Internet a cutting-edge, multi-player trivia game that provides many opportunities for players with all interests to play our free or wagering trivia games. The primary objective of Danger Room Gaming is to enter the Internet marketplace with top-of-the-line marketing, sales, organization, security and innovation to maximize the Company's success.Danger Room Gaming, B.V., a Curacao private limited company with its registered office in the country of Curacao ("Danger Room Gaming"), has developed and owns the trivia gaming software engine that enables i) Danger Room's wager-based trivia game Rapid Fire Trivia running real-time on the Internet; ii) white label versions of the wagering game; iii) Free and theme based trivia games owned by Danger Room Gaming. The wagering trivia game is licensed as a skill game, features real money wagering, is multi-player, allows unlimited users to wager on each question and distributes the "pot" equally to all players answering correctly. Rapid Fire Trivia and white label versions also have a progressive, slot-style jackpot allowing for payouts when the required percentage of players answers a question correctly. Users can choose from hundreds of categories, with varying wager amounts, running 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Danger Room Gaming's primary revenue streams are commissions from wagering, referral fees from bonus points (MyComps SM), margin on the redemption of MyComps for merchandise, and fees from cash out transactions. In May 2011, Danger Room Gaming was issued a gaming sub-license through Cyberluck Curacao N.V. from the government of Curacao for the operation of games of skill and games of chance.Rapid Fire Trivia integrates a player referral program which provides all players the opportunity to earn money though our MyCompsSM for promoting the game. Users are able to access real-time earnings statistics in their account. The game provides tools, links, banners and tutorials to help players earn money by referring other players. Users are encouraged to use friends and support while playing the game to earn the maximum amount of points and chances to win big jackpots.The Company's strengths and milestones include:

  • The Company does not have any significant non-convertible debt.
  • Danger Room Gaming has been issued a gaming license for games of skill and games of chance.
  • The Rapid Fire Trivia game has been statistically tested by a University of Chicago expert concluding that Rapid Fire Trivia is a game where skill is the predominant factor.
  • The trivia games are tested, complete and the file size is very light, which enables them to be played on nearly any browser enabled device including smart phones, mobile devices and mobile computers with high speed Internet connectivity.
  • The trivia games do not restrict the number of players who can play simultaneously.
  • The Company's operating costs will decline as a percentage of game revenue as gaming volume increases.
  • Prepared to launch Rapid Fire Trivia (the wagering trivia game), with deposit / cash out functionality through Merchant Processor.
  • Developed the My Comps Rewards SM redemption program for bonus points earned for play and referrals in both Rapid Fire Trivia and Free Trivia Game. This is also an incremental revenue stream.
  • Obtained a legal opinion from Lewis and Roca, a noted Las Vegas law firm specializing in gaming law, and a University of Chicago expert's statistical analysis that Rapid Fire Trivia is a game where skill is the predominant factor.
  • Have a staff of approximately 5 full time equivalents.
  • Actively pursuing over 10 white label domestic and international opportunities.
  • Retained a top gaming design firm in Las Vegas, Nevada to redesign the human factors and human interface to the games focusing on player excitement, satisfaction and retention.
The softw

— CrunchBase

Fire lookout tower

Fire lookout tower

A fire lookout tower, fire tower or lookout tower, provides housing and protection for a person known as a "fire lookout" whose duty it is to search for wildfires in the wilderness. The fire lookout tower is a small building, usually located on the summit of a mountain or other high vantage point, in order to maximize the viewing distance and range, known as view shed. From this vantage point the fire lookout can see any trace of smoke that may develop, determine the location by using a device known as an Osborne Fire Finder, and call fire suppression personnel to the fire. The typical fire lookout tower consists of a small room, known as a cab located atop a large steel, or wooden tower. However, sometimes natural rock may be used to create a lower platform. In some cases, the terrain makes it possible so there is no need for an additional tower and these are known as ground cabs. Ground cabs are called towers, even if they don't sit on a tower. Towers gained popularity in the early 1900s, and fires were reported using telephones, carrier pigeons, and heliographs. Although many fire lookout have fallen into disuse as a result of neglect, abandonment, and declining budgets, some fire service personnel have made an effort to preserve older fire towers, arguing that a good set of human eyes watching the forest for wildfire can be an effective and cheap fire safety measure.

— Freebase

Fire damper

Fire damper

Fire dampers are passive fire protection products used in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts to prevent the spread of fire inside the ductwork through fire-resistance rated walls and floors. Fire/smoke dampers are similar to fire dampers in fire resistance rating, and also prevent the spread of smoke inside the ducts. When a rise in temperature occurs, the fire damper closes, usually activated by a thermal element which melts at temperatures higher than ambient but low enough to indicate the presence of a fire, allowing springs to close the damper blades. Fire dampers can also close following receipt of an electrical signal from a fire alarm system utilising detectors remote from the damper, indicating the sensing of heat or smoke in the building occupied spaces or in the HVAC duct system. Regulations and fire test regimes vary from one country to another, which can result in different designs and applications.

— Wikipedia

Fire hydrant

Fire hydrant

A fire hydrant, is an active fire protection measure, and a source of water provided in most urban, suburban and rural areas with municipal water service to enable firefighters to tap into the municipal water supply to assist in extinguishing a fire. Buildings near a hydrant may qualify for an insurance discount since firefighters should be able to more rapidly extinguish a fire on the insured property. The concept of fire plugs dates to at least the 17th century. This was a time when firefighters responding to a call would dig down to the wooden water mains and hastily bore a hole to secure water to fight fires. The water would fill the hole creating a temporary well, and be transported from the well to the fire by bucket brigades or, later, by hand-pumped fire engines. The holes were then plugged with stoppers, normally redwood, which over time came to be known as fire plugs. The location of the plug would often be recorded or marked so that it could be reused in future fires. This is the source of the colloquial term fire plug still used for fire hydrants today. After the Great Fire of London in 1666, the city installed water mains with holes drilled at intervals, equipped with risers, allowing an access point to the wooden fire plugs from street level.

— Freebase

Fire extinguisher

Fire extinguisher

A fire extinguisher, flame extinguisher, or simply an extinguisher, is an active fire protection device used to extinguish or control small fires, often in emergency situations. It is not intended for use on an out-of-control fire, such as one which has reached the ceiling, endangers the user, or otherwise requires the expertise of a fire department. Typically, a fire extinguisher consists of a hand-held cylindrical pressure vessel containing an agent which can be discharged to extinguish a fire. In the United States, fire extinguishers, in all buildings other than houses, are generally required to be serviced and inspected by a Fire Protection service company at least annually. Some jurisdictions require more frequent service for fire extinguishers. The servicer places a tag on the extinguisher to indicate the type of service performed and when. There are two main types of fire extinguishers: stored pressure and cartridge-operated. In stored pressure units, the expellant is stored in the same chamber as the firefighting agent itself. Depending on the agent used, different propellants are used. With dry chemical extinguishers, nitrogen is typically used; water and foam extinguishers typically use air. Stored pressure fire extinguishers are the most common type. Cartridge-operated extinguishers contain the expellant gas in a separate cartridge that is punctured prior to discharge, exposing the propellant to the extinguishing agent. This type is not as common, used primarily in areas such as industrial facilities, where they receive higher-than-average use. They have the advantage of simple and prompt recharge, allowing an operator to discharge the extinguisher, recharge it, and return to the fire in a reasonable amount of time. Unlike stored pressure types, these extinguishers use compressed carbon dioxide instead of nitrogen, although nitrogen cartridges are used on low temperature models. Cartridge operated extinguishers are available in dry chemical and dry powder types in the U.S. and in water, wetting agent, foam, dry chemical, and dry powder types in the rest of the world.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "shopsoiled"?
  • A. new
  • B. commonplace
  • C. hackneyed
  • D. well-worn