Synonyms containing get the lead out

We've found 105,707 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea dance

Tea dance

A tea dance, or thé dansant is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings. By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc." Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore. The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lead

Lead

led, n. a well-known metal of a bluish-white colour: the plummet for sounding at sea: a thin plate of lead separating lines of type: (pl.) sheets of lead for covering roofs, a flat roof so covered.—v.t. to cover or fit with lead: (print.) to separate lines with leads.—n. Lead′-arm′ing, tallow, &c., placed in the hollow of a sounding-lead, to ascertain the nature of the bottom.—adjs. Lead′ed, fitted with or set in lead: (print.) separated by leads, as the lines of a book, &c.; Lead′en, made of lead: heavy: dull; Lead′en-heart′ed, having an unfeeling heart; Lead′en-step′ping (Milt.), moving slowly.—ns. Lead′-glance, lead ore, galena; Lead′-mill, a mill for grinding white-lead: a leaden disc charged with emery for grinding gems; Lead′-pen′cil, a pencil or instrument for drawing, &c., made of blacklead; Lead′-poi′soning, or Plumbism, poisoning by the absorption and diffusion of lead in the system, its commonest form, Lead or Painter's Colic; Leads′man, a seaman who heaves the lead.—adj. Lead′y, like lead. [A.S. leád; Ger. loth.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lead

Lead

lēd, v.t. to show the way by going first: to guide by the hand: to direct: to precede: to transport or carry: to allure.—v.i. to go before and show the way: to have a tendency: to exercise dominion:—pr.p. lead′ing; pa.t. and pa.p. led.—n. first place: precedence: direction: (naut.) the course of a running rope from end to end: the right of playing the first card in a round or trick: a main conductor in electrical distribution.—ns. Lead′er, one who leads or goes first: a chief: the leading editorial article in a newspaper (also Leading article): principal wheel in any machinery; Leaderette′, a brief newspaper leader; Lead′ership, state or condition of a leader or conductor; Lead′ing-bus′iness, the acting of the principal parts or rôles in plays; Lead′ing-mō′tive (Ger. leit-motif), in dramatic music, a principal theme: a theme, usually of but few tones, by which any personage or particular emotion is indicated by suggestion as often as it occurs; Lead′ing-ques′tion, a legal term for a question so put to a witness as to suggest the answer that is wished or expected.—n.pl. Lead′ing-strings, strings used to lead children when beginning to walk: vexatious care or custody.—Lead apes in hell (see Ape); Lead astray, to draw into a wrong course, to seduce from right conduct; Lead by the nose, to make one follow submissively; Lead in prayer, to offer up prayer in an assembly, uniting the prayers of others; Lead off, to begin or take the start in anything; Lead on, to persuade to go on, to draw on; Lead one a dance (see Dance); Lead up to, to bring about by degrees, to prepare for anything by steps or stages. [A.S. lǽdan, to lead, lád, a way; Ger. leiten, to lead.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Get

Get

get, v.t. to obtain: to seize: to procure or cause to be: to beget offspring: to learn: to persuade: (B.) to betake, to carry.—v.i. to arrive or put one's self in any place, state, or condition: to become:—pr.p. get′ting; pa.t. got; pa.p. got, (obs.) got′ten.ns. Get′ter, one who gets or obtains: one who begets; Get′ting, a gaining: anything gained: procreation; Get′-up, equipment: general appearance.—Get ahead, along, to make progress, advance; Get at, to reach, attain; Get off, to escape; Get on, to proceed, advance; Get out, to produce: to go away; Get over, to surmount; Get round, to circumvent: to persuade, talk over; Get through, to finish; Get up, to arise, to ascend: to arrange, prepare. [A.S. gitan, to get.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Out

Out

owt, adv. without, not within: gone forth: abroad: to the full stretch or extent: in a state of discovery, development, &c.: in a state of exhaustion, extinction, &c.: away from the mark: completely: at or to an end: to others, as to hire out: freely: forcibly: at a loss: unsheltered: uncovered.—prep. forth from: outside of: exterior: outlying, remote.—n. one who is out, esp. of office—opp. to In: leave to go out, an outing.—v.i. to go or come out.—interj. away! begone!—n. Out′-and-out′er, a thoroughgoer, a first-rate fellow.—adjs. Out′-of-door, open-air; Out-of-the-way′, uncommon: singular: secluded.—Out and away, by far; Out and out, thoroughly: completely—also as adj. thorough, complete; Out-at-elbows, worn-out, threadbare; Out of character, unbecoming: improper; Out of course, out of order; Out of date, unfashionable: not now in use; Out of favour, disliked; Out of hand, instantly; Out of joint, not in proper connection: disjointed; Out of one's mind, mad; Out of pocket, having spent more than one has received; Out of print, not to be had for sale, said of books, &c.; Out of sorts, or temper, unhappy: cross-tempered; Out of the common, unusual, pre-eminent; Out of the question, that cannot be at all considered; Out of time, too soon or too late: not keeping time in music; Out with, away with: (Scot.) outside of: say, do, &c., at once. [A.S. úte, út; Goth. ut, Ger. aus, Sans. ud.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lead glass

Lead glass

Lead glass is a variety of glass in which lead replaces the calcium content of a typical potash glass. Lead glass contains typically 18–40 weight% lead oxide, while modern lead crystal, historically also known as flint glass due to the original silica source, contains a minimum of 24% PbO. Lead glass is desirable owing to its decorative properties. Originally discovered by Englishman George Ravenscroft in 1674, the technique of adding lead oxide improved the appearance of the glass and made it easier to melt using sea-coal as a furnace fuel. This technique also increased "working period" making the glass easier to manipulate. Technically, the term crystal is not applied to glass, as glass, by definition, lacks a crystalline structure. The use of the term lead crystal remains popular for historical and commercial reasons. It is retained from the Venetian word cristallo to describe the rock crystal imitated by Murano glassmakers. This naming convention has been maintained to the present day to describe decorative hollow-ware. Due to the potential health risks of lead that it contains, true lead crystal glassware is rare nowadays. One material that is commonly used to manufacture glassware and referred to as "crystal" is lead-free crystal glass. In lead-free crystal glass, barium oxide, zinc oxide, or potassium oxide are employed instead of lead oxide. Lead-free crystal has a similar refractive index to lead crystal, but it is lighter and it has less dispersive power. In the European Union, labeling of "crystal" products is regulated by Council Directive 69/493/EEC, which defines four categories, depending on the chemical composition and properties of the material. Only glass products containing at least 24% of lead oxide may be referred to as "lead crystal". Products with less lead oxide, or glass products with other metal oxides used in place of lead oxide, must be labeled "crystallin" or "crystal glass".

— Freebase

EVICTED

EVICTED

If someone is evicted from the place where they are living, they are forced to leave it, usually because they have broken a law or contract. to legally force someone to leave the house they are living in, usually because they have not paid their rent; evict someone from something: expel or eject without recourse to legal process; to expel (a person, especially a tenant) from land, a building, etc., by legal process, as for nonpayment of rent.to recover (property, titles, etc.) by virtue of superior legal title.To put out by force:bump, dismiss, eject, expel, oust, throw out.Informal: chuck.Slang: boot (out), bounce, kick out.Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear. expel, remove, turn out, put out, throw out, oust, kick out (informal), eject, dislodge, boot out (informal), force to leave, dispossess, chuck out (informal), show the door (to), turf out (informal), throw on to the streets; to force someone to leave somewhere; drive out, banish, send away.

— Editors Contribution

Lead styphnate

Lead styphnate

Lead styphnate (lead 2,4,6-trinitroresorcinate, C6HN3O8Pb ), whose name is derived from styphnic acid, is an explosive used as a component in primer and detonator mixtures for less sensitive secondary explosives. Lead styphnate is only slightly soluble in water and methanol Samples of lead styphnate vary in color from yellow to gold, orange, reddish-brown, to brown. Lead styphnate is known in various polymorphs, hydrates, and basic salts. Normal lead styphnate monohydrate, monobasic lead styphnate, tribasic lead styphnate dihydrate, and pentabasic lead styphnate dehydrate as well as α, β polymorphs of lead styphnate exist. Two forms of lead styphnate are six-sided monohydrate crystals and small rectangular crystals. Lead styphnate is particularly sensitive to fire and the discharge of static electricity. When dry, it can readily detonate by static discharges from the human body. The longer and narrower the crystals, the more susceptible lead styphnate is to static electricity. Lead styphnate does not react with metals and is less sensitive to shock and friction than mercury fulminate or lead azide. It is stable in storage, even at elevated temperatures. As with other lead-containing compounds, lead styphnate is toxic owing to heavy metal poisoning.

— Wikipedia

Plumb

Plumb

plum, n. a mass of lead or other material, hung on a string, to show the perpendicular position: the perpendicular direction or position.—adj. perpendicular.—adv. perpendicularly.—v.t. to adjust by a plumb-line: to make perpendicular: to sound the depth of, as water by a plumb-line.—n. Plumb′-bob, a conoid-shaped metal weight at the end of a plumb-line.—adjs. Plum′bēan, Plum′bēous, consisting of, or resembling, lead: stupid; Plumb′ic, pertaining to, or obtained from, lead; Plumbif′erous, producing lead.—n. Plumb′ing, the art of casting and working in lead, &c.—adj. Plumb′less, incapable of being sounded.—ns. Plumb′-line, a line to which a mass of lead is attached to show the perpendicular: a plummet; Plumb′-rule, a narrow board with a plumb-line fastened to the top, used to determine a perpendicular. [Fr. plomb—L. plumbum, lead.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Get

Get

to arrive at, or bring one's self into, a state, condition, or position; to come to be; to become; -- with a following adjective or past participle belonging to the subject of the verb; as, to get sober; to get awake; to get beaten; to get elected

— Webster Dictionary

Not out

Not out

In cricket, a batsman will be not out if he comes out to bat in an innings and has not been dismissed by the end of the innings. One may similarly describe a batsman as not out while the innings is still in progress. A batsman's score is often appended with an asterisk to indicate that he was not out; for example, '10*' is read '10 not out'. At least one batsman will be not out at the end of an innings, because once ten batsmen are out, the eleventh will have no partner to bat on with. Two batsmen will be not out if a declaration is made in first-class cricket, and often at the end of the scheduled number of overs in limited overs cricket. A batsman further down the batting order than the not-out batsmen will not come out to the crease at all and is noted as did not bat rather than not out; by contrast, a batsman who comes to the crease but faces no balls is not out. A batsman who retires hurt is considered not out; an uninjured batsman who retires is considered retired out. Batting averages are calculated as runs divided by outs, which means that a player who often ends the innings not out may get an inflated batting average. Examples of this include Michael Bevan, James Anderson, and Bill Johnston topping the batting averages on the 1953 Australian tour of England. However, the flip side of the argument is that, if not outs were counted for the purpose of batting averages, a good batsman could come in and only have time to make 0 not out, facing three balls from a bowler, and thus get unduly penalised for factors out of his control. This argument is prevailing among cricket statisticians, who have used this method of collecting batting averages since the 18th century. Furthermore a batsman will tend to be at his most vulnerable early in an innings before he has "got his eye in"; as a result it may be considered a greater achievement to achieve two scores of 20 not out and 20 than to make one score of 40, since in the latter instance the batsman will only have had to negotiate the start of one innings.

— Freebase

Lead oxide

Lead oxide

Lead oxides are a group of inorganic compounds with formulas including lead and oxygen. Common lead oxides include: ⁕Lead oxide, PbO, litharge, massicot ⁕Lead oxide, Pb3O4, minium, red leadLead dioxide, PbO2 Less common lead oxides are: ⁕Lead oxide, Pb2O3, lead sesquioxide ⁕Pb12O19 ⁕The so-called black lead oxide, which is a mixture of PbO and fine-powdered metal Pb and used in the production of lead acid batteries.

— Freebase

massicot

massicot

lead monoxide, PbO, obtained as a yellow amorphous powder, the fused and crystalline form of which is called litharge; lead ocher. It is used as a pigment; also, lead oxide yellow, as opposed to red lead, which is lead tetroxide PbO.

— Wiktionary

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An antonym of "besotted"
  • A. flush
  • B. affluent
  • C. sober
  • D. stringent