Synonyms containing get the wind up

We've found 87,364 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea dance

Tea dance

A tea dance, or thé dansant is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings. By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc." Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore. The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Wind

Wind

wind (poet. wīnd), n. air in motion: breath: flatulence: anything insignificant: the wind instruments in an orchestra: air impregnated with scent: a hint or suggestion of something secret, publicity: (slang) a part of the body near the stomach: a disease of sheep in which the inflamed intestines are distended by gases.—v.t. (wīnd) to sound or signal by blowing: to scent: (wind) to expose to the wind: to drive hard, so as to put out of breath: to allow to recover wind:—pr.p. wīnd′ing and wind′ing; pa.p. wind′ed and wound.—ns. Wind′age, the difference between the size of the bore of a gun and that of the ball or shell: the influence of the wind in deflecting a missile; Wind′bag, a person of mere words.—adjs. Wind′-bound, hindered from sailing by a contrary wind; Wind′-brō′ken, affected with convulsive breathing—of a horse; Wind′-chang′ing, fickle.—ns. Wind′-chart, a chart showing the direction of the wind; Wind′-chest, the box or reservoir that supplies compressed air to the pipes or reeds of an organ; Wind′-drop′sy, tympanites; Wind′-egg, an addle-egg, one soft-shelled or imperfectly formed; Wīnd′er, one who sounds a horn: one who, or that which, winds or rolls; Wind′fall, fruit blown off a tree by the wind: any unexpected money or other advantage.—adj. Windfall′en, blown down by wind.—ns. Wind′-flow′er, the wood-anemone; Wind′-fur′nace, any form of furnace using the natural draught of a chimney without aid of a bellows; Wind′-gall, a puffy swelling about the fetlock joints of a horse; Wind′-gauge, an instrument for gauging or measuring the velocity of the wind: an appliance fixed to a gun by means of which the force of the wind is ascertained so that allowance may be made for it in sighting; Wind′-gun, air-gun; Wind′-hō′ver, the kestrel.—adv. Wind′ily.—ns. Wind′iness; Wind′-in′strument, a musical instrument sounded by means of wind or by the breath.—adj. Wind′less, without wind.—ns. Wind′mill, a mill for performing any class of work in which fixed machinery can be employed, and in which the motive-power is the force of the wind acting on a set of sails; Wind′pipe, the passage for the breath between the mouth and lungs, the trachea.—adj. Wind′-rode (naut.), riding at anchor with head to the wind.—ns. Wind′rose, a graphic representation of the relative frequency of winds from different directions drawn with reference to a centre; Wind′row, a row of hay raked together to be made into cocks, a row of peats, &c., set up for drying; Wind′-sail (naut.), a wide funnel of canvas used to convey a stream of air below deck.—adj.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Wind

Wind

Wind is the flow of gases on a large scale. On the surface of the Earth, wind consists of the bulk movement of air. In outer space, solar wind is the movement of gases or charged particles from the Sun through space, while planetary wind is the outgassing of light chemical elements from a planet's atmosphere into space. Winds are commonly classified by their spatial scale, their speed, the types of forces that cause them, the regions in which they occur, and their effect. The strongest observed winds on a planet in the Solar System occur on Neptune and Saturn. Winds have various aspects: velocity (wind speed); the density of the gas involved; energy content or wind energy. The wind is also an important means of transportation for seeds and small birds; with time things can travel thousands of miles in the wind. In meteorology, winds are often referred to according to their strength, and the direction from which the wind is blowing. Short bursts of high speed wind are termed gusts. Strong winds of intermediate duration (around one minute) are termed squalls. Long-duration winds have various names associated with their average strength, such as breeze, gale, storm, and hurricane. Wind occurs on a range of scales, from thunderstorm flows lasting tens of minutes, to local breezes generated by heating of land surfaces and lasting a few hours, to global winds resulting from the difference in absorption of solar energy between the climate zones on Earth. The two main causes of large-scale atmospheric circulation are the differential heating between the equator and the poles, and the rotation of the planet (Coriolis effect). Within the tropics, thermal low circulations over terrain and high plateaus can drive monsoon circulations. In coastal areas the sea breeze/land breeze cycle can define local winds; in areas that have variable terrain, mountain and valley breezes can dominate local winds. In human civilization, the concept of wind has been explored in mythology, influenced the events of history, expanded the range of transport and warfare, and provided a power source for mechanical work, electricity, and recreation. Wind powers the voyages of sailing ships across Earth's oceans. Hot air balloons use the wind to take short trips, and powered flight uses it to increase lift and reduce fuel consumption. Areas of wind shear caused by various weather phenomena can lead to dangerous situations for aircraft. When winds become strong, trees and human-made structures are damaged or destroyed. Winds can shape landforms, via a variety of aeolian processes such as the formation of fertile soils, such as loess, and by erosion. Dust from large deserts can be moved great distances from its source region by the prevailing winds; winds that are accelerated by rough topography and associated with dust outbreaks have been assigned regional names in various parts of the world because of their significant effects on those regions. Wind also affects the spread of wildfires. Winds can disperse seeds from various plants, enabling the survival and dispersal of those plant species, as well as flying insect populations. When combined with cold temperatures, the wind has a negative impact on livestock. Wind affects animals' food stores, as well as their hunting and defensive strategies.

— Wikipedia

Wind farm

Wind farm

A wind farm is a group of wind turbines in the same location used to produce clean energy . A large wind farm may consist of several hundred individual wind turbines, and cover an extended area of hundreds of square miles, but the land between the turbines may be used for agricultural or other purposes. A wind farm may also be located offshore. Many of the largest operational onshore wind farms are located in the United States and China. For example, the Gansu Wind Farm in China has over 5,000 MW installed with a goal of 20,000 MW by 2020. The Alta Wind Energy Center in California, United States is the largest onshore wind farm outside of China, with a capacity of 1020 MW of power. As of Apr. 2013, the 630 MW London Array in the UK is the largest offshore wind farm in the world, followed by the 504 MW Greater Gabbard wind farm in the UK. There are many large wind farms under construction and these include Sinus Holding Wind Farm, Anholt Offshore Wind Farm, BARD Offshore 1, Clyde Wind Farm, Lincs Wind Farm, London Array, Lower Snake River Wind Project, Macarthur Wind Farm, Shepherds Flat Wind Farm, and Sheringham Shoal.

— Freebase

Get

Get

get, v.t. to obtain: to seize: to procure or cause to be: to beget offspring: to learn: to persuade: (B.) to betake, to carry.—v.i. to arrive or put one's self in any place, state, or condition: to become:—pr.p. get′ting; pa.t. got; pa.p. got, (obs.) got′ten.ns. Get′ter, one who gets or obtains: one who begets; Get′ting, a gaining: anything gained: procreation; Get′-up, equipment: general appearance.—Get ahead, along, to make progress, advance; Get at, to reach, attain; Get off, to escape; Get on, to proceed, advance; Get out, to produce: to go away; Get over, to surmount; Get round, to circumvent: to persuade, talk over; Get through, to finish; Get up, to arise, to ascend: to arrange, prepare. [A.S. gitan, to get.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Wind wave

Wind wave

In fluid dynamics, wind waves, or wind-generated waves, are water surface waves that occur on the free surface of the oceans and other bodies (like lakes, rivers, canals, puddles or ponds). They result from the wind blowing over an area of fluid surface. Waves in the oceans can travel thousands of miles before reaching land. Wind waves on Earth range in size from small ripples, to waves over 100 ft (30 m) high.When directly generated and affected by local waters, a wind wave system is called a wind sea. After the wind ceases to blow, wind waves are called swells. More generally, a swell consists of wind-generated waves that are not significantly affected by the local wind at that time. They have been generated elsewhere or some time ago. Wind waves in the ocean are called ocean surface waves. Wind waves have a certain amount of randomness: subsequent waves differ in height, duration, and shape with limited predictability. They can be described as a stochastic process, in combination with the physics governing their generation, growth, propagation, and decay—as well as governing the interdependence between flow quantities such as: the water surface movements, flow velocities and water pressure. The key statistics of wind waves (both seas and swells) in evolving sea states can be predicted with wind wave models. Although waves are usually considered in the water seas of Earth, the hydrocarbon seas of Titan may also have wind-driven waves.

— Wikipedia

Boulder Wind Power

Boulder Wind Power

Boulder Wind Power, Inc. engages in designing and manufacturing of wind turbines. Boulder Wind Power, Inc. was incorporated in 2009 and is based in Boulder, Colorado.Boulder Wind Power was founded by industry veterans who recognized that wind energy must become cost competitive with fossil fuel alternatives before it will gain mass adoption. The team also understood that dramatic cost reduction can only be achieved by taking a fundamentally different approach to wind generator and turbine design - not just by making incremental tweaks to existing technologies. That is what Boulder Wind Power is all about - we are bringing a radically new generator and power conversion system to market that enables wind energy to compete favorably with fossil fuel costs. We are a private company based in Louisville, Colorado - the epicenter of wind research in the US - and we're backed by New Enterprise Associates - one of the leading alternative energy investors in the world. We've assembled a team of wind industry experts who have challenged conventional wisdom and engineered the next generation wind turbine power generation system. Our team has experience with leaders in the wind and power generation industries including General Electric, Suzlon, Siemens, DONG Energy, Clipper Windpower, Horizon Wind Energy, General Dynamics and the National Renewable Energy Laboratories (“NREL”).

— CrunchBase

Wind power

Wind power

Wind power is the conversion of wind energy into a useful form of energy, such as using wind turbines to make electrical power, windmills for mechanical power, wind pumps for water pumping or drainage, or sails to propel ships. Large wind farms consist of hundreds of individual wind turbines which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land, and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are considerably higher. Small onshore wind farms provide electricity to isolated locations. Utility companies increasingly buy surplus electricity produced by small domestic wind turbines. Wind power, as an alternative to fossil fuels, is plentiful, renewable, widely distributed, clean, produces no greenhouse gas emissions during operation and uses little land. The effects on the environment are generally less problematic than those from other power sources. As of 2011, Denmark is generating more than a quarter of its electricity from wind and 83 countries around the world are using wind power on a commercial basis. In 2010 wind energy production was over 2.5% of total worldwide electricity usage, and growing rapidly at more than 25% per annum. The monetary cost per unit of energy produced is similar to the cost for new coal and natural gas installations.

— Freebase

Magnetopause

Magnetopause

The magnetopause is the abrupt boundary between a magnetosphere and the surrounding plasma. For planetary science, the magnetopause is the boundary between the planet’s magnetic field and the solar wind. The location of the magnetopause is determined by the balance between the pressure of the dynamic planetary magnetic field and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. As the solar wind pressure increases and decreases, the magnetopause moves inward and outward in response. Waves along the magnetopause move in the direction of the solar wind flow in response to small scale variations in the solar wind pressure and to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The solar wind is supersonic and passes through a bow shock where the direction of flow is changed so that most of the solar wind plasma is deflected to either side of the magnetopause, much like water is deflected before the bow of a ship. The zone of shocked solar wind plasma is the magnetosheath. At Earth and all the other planets with intrinsic magnetic fields, some solar wind plasma succeeds in entering and becoming trapped within the magnetosphere. At Earth, the solar wind plasma which enters the magnetosphere forms the plasma sheet. The amount of solar wind plasma and energy which enters the magnetosphere is regulated by the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field which is embedded in the solar wind.

— Freebase

Wind shear

Wind shear

Wind shear, sometimes referred to as windshear or wind gradient, is a difference in wind speed and direction over a relatively short distance in the atmosphere. Wind shear can be broken down into vertical and horizontal components, with horizontal wind shear seen across fronts and near the coast, and vertical shear typically near the surface, though also at higher levels in the atmosphere near upper level jets and frontal zones aloft. Wind shear itself is a microscale meteorological phenomenon occurring over a very small distance, but it can be associated with mesoscale or synoptic scale weather features such as squall lines and cold fronts. It is commonly observed near microbursts and downbursts caused by thunderstorms, fronts, areas of locally higher low level winds referred to as low level jets, near mountains, radiation inversions that occur due to clear skies and calm winds, buildings, wind turbines, and sailboats. Wind shear has a significant effect during take-off and landing of aircraft due to its effects on control of the aircraft, and it has been a sole or contributing cause of many aircraft accidents. Sound movement through the atmosphere is affected by wind shear, which can bend the wave front, causing sounds to be heard where they normally would not, or vice versa. Strong vertical wind shear within the troposphere also inhibits tropical cyclone development, but helps to organize individual thunderstorms into longer life cycles which can then produce severe weather. The thermal wind concept explains how differences in wind speed at different heights are dependent on horizontal temperature differences, and explains the existence of the jet stream.

— Freebase

Lee shore

Lee shore

The terms lee shore and windward or ward shore are nautical terms used to describe a stretch of shoreline. A lee shore is one that is to the lee side of a vessel - meaning the wind is blowing towards it. A weather shore has the wind blowing from inland over it out to sea. For example, if you were standing on a beach, looking out to sea with the wind at your back, you are standing on a weather shore. If the wind is blowing at you, you are on a lee shore. The "lee" of a boat is the side that the wind touches last as it crosses the boat; in the diagram it is left or port side of the boat. The boat in the diagram has a lee shore to its west. In the diagram, the other side of the island, to the far west, has a weather shore. The wind blows over the shore as it heads to sea. This wind, because it blows from east to west, is called an "easterly" wind. This is because the source of a wind is more ascertainable or knowable than its destination, so winds are named for their source. This is very confusing for landsmen, as the "leeward side" of the boat, and the "lee shore" of the land face opposite directions, as the diagram shows. "Lee" historically means "shelter", but appears to have shifted, in the sole case of shorelines, to describe the shore exposed to the wind. This would make perfect sense to the sailor, standing on the leeward side of his ship, watching it being pushed towards an exposed shoreline by the wind.

— Freebase

Windsock

Windsock

A windsock is a conical textile tube designed to indicate wind direction and relative wind speed. Windsocks typically are used at airports and at chemical plants where there is risk of gaseous leakage. They are sometimes located alongside highways at windy locations. Wind direction is the opposite of the direction in which the windsock is pointing. Windspeed is indicated by the windsock's angle relative to the mounting pole; in low winds, the windsock droops; in high winds it flies horizontally. Per FAA standards referenced below, a 15-knot wind will fully extend the properly functioning windsock. A 3-knot breeze will cause the properly functioning windsock to orient itself according to the wind. Per Transport Canada Standards: a 15kn wind will fully extend the Wind Sock, a 10kt wind will cause the wind sock to be 5° below the horizontal, a 6kt wind will cause the wind sock to be 30° below the horizontal. At many airports, windsocks are lighted at night, either by flood lights on top surrounding it or with one mounted on the pole shining inside it.

— Freebase

Rounding up

Rounding up

Rounding-up is a phenomenon that occurs in sailing when the helmsman (or tiller-handler) is no longer able to control the direction of the boat and it heads up (or "rounds up") into the wind, causing the boat to slow down, stall out, or tack. This occurs when the wind overpowers the ability of the rudder to maintain a straight course. For example, the sailboat may heel over so far that the rudder no longer engages in the water, or only to such a small extent that it can no longer steer the boat. When this happens is dependent on a number of factors such as the velocity of the wind, design of the hull and rudder and shape of the sails. This can be dangerous if it causes collisions between boats if sailing close together. Rounding up can be startling to those on board: The boat turns into the eye of the wind with all sails fluttering. However, unless the boat is in irons (stopped facing directly into the wind), control can be regained by steering the boat off the wind again to refill the sails and regain the desired course. Often the crew will need to ease out the sheets (lines that control the trim of the sail) before this can occur, in order to reduce the wind force on the sails. Rounding up is in fact a safety design of most sailboats that can help prevent a knock-down and allow the helmsman to regain control of the boat. An occasional round-up may simply be the result of a strong gust of wind. If it occurs regularly, this may be a sign that too much sail is raised and the crew may need to lower one or more sails, change to smaller sails, or reef. In smaller sailboats such as racing dinghies where the sail cannot be lessened or reefed, frequent round-ups may be a sign that the wind conditions are too strong for the boats and they should immediately proceed to shelter.

— Wikipedia

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A word similar to "limited"
  • A. unqualified
  • B. circumscribed
  • C. immoderate
  • D. general