Synonyms containing give entrance to

We've found 7,276 synonyms:

Give

Give

giv, v.t. to bestow: to impart: to yield: to grant: to permit: to afford: to furnish: to pay or render, as thanks: to pronounce, as a decision: to show, as a result: to apply, as one's self: to allow or admit.—v.i. to yield to pressure: to begin to melt: to grow soft: to open, or give an opening or view, to lead (with upon, on, into):—pr.p. giv′ing; pa.t. gāve; pa.p. given (giv′n).p.adj. Giv′en, bestowed: specified: addicted, disposed to: admitted, supposed.—ns. Giv′er, one who gives or bestows; Giv′ing, the act of bestowing: (Shak.) an alleging of what is not real.—Give and take, to give and get fairly, fair measure on both sides; Give birth to, to bring forth: to originate; Give chase, to pursue; Give ear, to listen; Give forth, to emit, to publish; Give ground, place, to give way, to yield; Give in to, to yield assent or obedience to; Give it to one (coll.), to scold or beat anybody severely; Give line, head, rein, &c., to give more liberty or scope—the metaphor from angling and driving; Give one's self away, to betray one's secret by a slip of the tongue, &c.; Give out, to report, to emit; Give over, to cease; Give the lie to, to charge openly with falsehood; Give tongue, to bark; Give up, to abandon; Give way, to fall back, to yield, to withdraw: to begin rowing—usually as a command to a crew. [A.S. giefan; Goth. giban, Ger. geben.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gate

Gate

gāt, n. a passage into a city, enclosure, or any large building: a narrow opening or defile: a frame in the entrance into any enclosure: an entrance.—v.t. to supply with a gate: at Oxford and Cambridge, to punish by requiring the offender to be within the college gates by a certain hour.—adj. Gā′ted, punished with such restriction.—ns. Gate′-fine, the fine imposed for disobedience to such orders; Gate′-house (archit.), a building over or near the gate giving entrance to a city, abbey, college, &c.; Gate′-keep′er, Gate′man, one who watches over the opening and shutting of a gate.—adj. Gate′less, not having a gate.—ns. Gate′-mon′ey, the money taken for entrance to an athletic or other exhibition, sometimes simply 'gate;' Gate′-tow′er, a tower built beside or over a gate; Gate′-vein, the great abdominal vein; Gate′way, the way through a gate: the gate itself: any entrance.—Gate of justice, a gate as of a city, temple, &c., where a sovereign or judge sat to dispense justice; Gates of death, a phrase expressing the near approach of death.—Break gates, at Oxford and Cambridge, to enter college after the prescribed hour; Ivory gate, in poetical imagery, the semi-transparent gate of the house of sleep, through which dreams appear distorted into pleasant and delusive shapes; Stand in the gate (B.), to occupy a position of defence. [A.S. geat, a way; Dut. gat, Ice. gat; not in Goth. and High Ger.; prob. related to get or gate.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Entrance pupil

Entrance pupil

In an optical system, the entrance pupil is the optical image of the physical aperture stop, as 'seen' through the front of the lens system. The corresponding image of the aperture as seen through the back of the lens system is called the exit pupil. If there is no lens in front of the aperture, the entrance pupil's location and size are identical to those of the aperture. Optical elements in front of the aperture will produce a magnified or diminished image that is displaced from the location of the physical aperture. The entrance pupil is usually a virtual image: it lies behind the first optical surface of the system. The geometric location of the entrance pupil is the vertex of the camera's angle of view and consequently its center of perspective, perspective point, view point, projection centre or no-parallax point. This point is important in panoramic photography, because the camera must be rotated around it in order to avoid parallax errors in the final, stitched panorama. Depending on the lens design, the entrance pupil location on the optical axis may be behind, within or in front of the lens system; and even at infinite distance from the lens in the case of telecentric systems.

— Freebase

Hawara

Hawara

Hawara is an archaeological site of Ancient Egypt, south of the site of Crocodilopolis ('Arsinoe', also known as 'Medinet al-Faiyum') at the entrance to the depression of the Fayyum oasis. The first excavations at the site were made by Karl Lepsius, in 1843. William Flinders Petrie excavated at Hawara, in 1888, finding papyri of the 1st and 2nd centuries CE, and, north of the pyramid, a vast necropolis where he found 146 portraits on coffins dating to the Roman period, famous as being among the very few surviving examples of painted portraits from Classical Antiquity, the "Fayoum portraits" illustrated in Roman history textbooks. Amenemhat III was the last powerful ruler of the 12th Dynasty, and the pyramid he built at Hawara (illustration, right) is believed to post-date the so-called "Black Pyramid" built by the same ruler at Dahshur. This is believed to have been Amenemhet's final resting place. At Hawara there was also the intact (pyramid) tomb of Neferu-Ptah, daughter of Amenemhet III. This tomb was found about 2 km South of the king's pyramid. In common with the Middle Kingdom pyramids constructed after Amenemhat II, it was built of mudbrick round a core of limestone passages and burial chambers, and faced with limestone. Most of the facing stone was later pillaged for use in other buildings— a fate common to almost all of Egypt's pyramids— and today the pyramid is little more than an eroded, vaguely pyramidal mountain of mud brick, and of the once magnificent mortuary temple precinct formerly enclosed by a wall there is little left beyond the foundation bed of compacted sand and chips and shards of limestone. From the pyramid entrance a sloping passageway with steps runs down to a small room and a further short horizontal passage. In the roof of this horizontal passage there was a concealed sliding trapdoor weighing 20 tons. If this was found and opened a robber would find himself confronted by an empty passage at a right angle to the passage below, closed by wooden doors, or by a passage parallel to the passage below, carefully filled with mud and stone blocking. He would assume that the blocking concealed the entrance and waste time removing it (thereby increasing the likelihood of detection by the pyramid guardians). In fact there was a second 20-ton trapdoor in the roof of the empty passage, giving onto a second empty passage, also at a right angle to the first. This too had a 20-ton trapdoor giving onto a passage at a right angle to its predecessor (thus the interior of the pyramid was circled by these passages). However this passage ended in a large area of mud and stone blocking that presumably concealed the burial chamber. This, however, was a blind and merely filled a wide but shallow alcove. Two blind shafts in the floor, carefully filled with cut stone blocks, further wasted the robbers' time, for the real entrance to the burial chamber was even more carefully concealed and lay between the blind shafts and opposite the alcove. Despite these elaborate protective measures, Petrie found that none of the trapdoors had been slid into place and the wooden doors were open. Whether this indicated negligence on the part of the burial party, an intention to return and place further burials in the pyramid (when found there were two sarcophagii in the quartzite monolith described below and room for at least two more), or a deliberate action to facilitate robbery of the tomb, we cannot know. The burial chamber was made out of a single quartzite monolith which was lowered into a larger chamber lined with limestone. This monolithic slab weighed an estimated 110 tons according to Petrie. A course of brick was placed on the chamber to raise the ceiling then the chamber was covered with 3 quartzite slabs (estimated weight 45 tons each). Above the burial chamber were 2 relieving chambers. This was topped with 50 ton limestone slabs forming a pointed roof. Then an enormous arch of brick 3 feet thick was built over the pointed roof to support the core of the pyramid.The entrance to the pyramid is today flooded to a depth of 6 metres as a result of the waters from the Bahr Yusuf (Joseph's Canal) canal, which flows around two sides of the site and passes within 30m of the pyramid. The huge mortuary temple that originally stood adjacent to this pyramid is believed to have formed the basis of the complex of buildings with galleries and courtyards called a "labyrinth" by Herodotus (see quote at Labyrinth), and mentioned by Strabo and Diodorus Siculus. (There is no historicity to the assertion of Diodorus Siculus that this was the model for the labyrinth of Crete that Greeks imagined housed the Minotaur,) The demolition of the "labyrinth" may date in part to the reign of Ptolemy II, under whom the Pharaonic city of Shedyt (Greek Crocodilopolis, the modern Medinet el-Fayum) was renamed to honour his sister-wife Arsinoë; a massive Ptolemaic building program at Arsinoe has been suggested as the ultimate destination

— Wikipedia

Siq

Siq

The Siq (Arabic: السيق‎, transliterated al-Sīq, transcribed as-Sīq, literally 'the Shaft') is the main entrance to the ancient Nabatean city of Petra in southern Jordan. Also known as Siqit, it is a dim, narrow gorge (in some points no more than 3 metres (10 ft) wide) and winds its way approximately 1.2 kilometres (0.75 mi) and ends at Petra's most elaborate ruin, Al Khazneh (the Treasury). A wide valley outside leading to the Siq is known as the Bab as-Sīq (Gateway to the Siq). Unlike slot canyons such as Antelope Canyon in the American Southwest, which are directly shaped by water, the Siq is a natural geological fault split apart by tectonic forces; only later was it worn smooth by water. The walls that enclose the Siq stand between 91–182 metres (299–597 ft) in height.The entrance to the Siq contains a huge dam, reconstructed in 1963 and again in 1991, designed to bar the mouth of the Siq and reroute the waters of Wadi Musa. The dam is a fairly true reconstruction of what the Nabataeans did to control Wadi Musa between the 1st century BC and the beginning of the 1st century AD. The entrance also contains the remnants of a monumental arch, of which only the two abutments and some hewn stones of the arch itself have survived. The arch collapsed in 1896 following an earthquake, but its appearance is known from the lithographs of Matthew Boulby and David Roberts.The Siq was used as the grand caravan entrance into Petra. Along both walls of the fissure are a number of votive niches containing baetyli, which suggest that the Siq was sacred to the Nabatean people. In 1998, a group of statues were uncovered when digging was conducted to lower the road by more than six feet. Although the upper part is greatly eroded, it is still possible to recognise the figures of two merchants, each leading two camels. The figures are almost twice lifesize.Along the Siq are some underground chambers, the function of which has not yet been clarified. The possibility that they were tombs has been excluded, and archaeologists find it difficult to believe that they were dwellings. The majority consensus is that they housed the guards that defended the main entrance to Petra.

— Wikipedia

postern

postern

A back-gate, backdoor, side entrance, or other gateway distinct from the main entrance.

— Wiktionary

introitus

introitus

The entrance to a hollow organ or canal; often specifically the entrance to the vagina.

— Wiktionary

Door

Door

dōr, n. the usual entrance into a house, room, or passage: the wooden frame on hinges closing up the entrance: a means of approach or access.—ns. Door′-bell; Door′-case, the frame which encloses a door; Door′-cheek (Scot.), one of the side-posts of a door; Door′-keep′er; Door′-knock′er; Door′-mat; Door′-nail; Door′-plate, a plate on or at a door with the householder's name on it; Door′-post, the jamb or side-piece of a door; Door′-sill, the threshold of a doorway; Door′-stead, a doorway; Door′-step, Door′-stone, the step-stone; Door′way, the entrance or passage closed by the door; Door′-yard, a yard about the door of a house; Fold′ing-door, a door in two halves, each of which may be folded back against the wall.—Darken one's door, to cross one's threshold; Death's door, on the point of death, in great danger of death; Next door to, in the house next to: near to, bordering upon, very nearly; Out of doors, in the open air; Show to the door, to dismiss with ignominy. [A.S. duru; Ger. thor, thür; Gr. thyra, L. fores (pl.), a door.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)

Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)

"Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)" is a song by English musician George Harrison and the opening track of his 1973 album Living in the Material World. It was released as the lead single from the album in May that year and became Harrison's second US number 1, after "My Sweet Lord". In doing so, the song demoted Paul McCartney & Wings' "My Love" from the top of the Billboard Hot 100, marking a rare instance where two former Beatles held the top two chart positions in America. The single also reached the top ten in Britain and Canada, and in other singles charts around the world. "Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)" is one of Harrison's most popular songs, among fans and music critics, and features a series of much-praised slide-guitar solos from Harrison. The recording signalled a deliberate departure from his earlier post-Beatles work, in the scaling down of the big sound synonymous with his 1970–71 collaborations with co-producer Phil Spector. Other musicians on the recording include Nicky Hopkins and Jim Keltner. The lyrics' subject matter is reincarnation, and Harrison described the song as "a prayer and personal statement between me, the Lord, and whoever likes it". Harrison performed "Give Me Love" at every concert during his rare tours as a solo artist, and a live version appears on his 1992 album Live in Japan. Marisa Monte, Dave Davies, Elliott Smith, Ron Sexsmith, Sting, James Taylor and Elton John are among the artists who have covered the song. At the November 2002 Concert for George tribute to Harrison, Jeff Lynne performed "Give Me Love", with Andy Fairweather-Low and Marc Mann playing the twin slide-guitar parts.

— Freebase

Vestibule

Vestibule

A vestibule is a lobby, entrance hall, or passage between the entrance and the interior of a building. The same term can apply to structures in modern or ancient Roman architecture. In modern architecture vestibule typically refers to a small room or hall between an entrance and the interior of the building or house. In Roman architecture, vestibule referred to a partially enclosed area between the interior of the house and the street.

— Freebase

Scotland Yard

Scotland Yard

Scotland Yard is a metonym for the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, the territorial police force responsible for policing most of London. The name derives from the location of the original Metropolitan Police headquarters at 4 Whitehall Place, which had a rear entrance on a street called Great Scotland Yard. The Scotland Yard entrance became the public entrance to the police station, and over time the street and the Metropolitan Police became synonymous. The New York Times wrote in 1964 that just as Wall Street gave its name to New York's financial district, Scotland Yard did the same for police activity in London. The force moved away from Scotland Yard in 1890, and the name New Scotland Yard was adopted for subsequent headquarters. The current New Scotland Yard is located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. In 2013 it was announced that the force will move to a smaller building on the Victoria Embankment in 2015, which will be renamed Scotland Yard.

— Freebase

Torii

Torii

A torii is a traditional Japanese gate most commonly found at the entrance of or within a Shinto shrine, where it symbolically marks the transition from the profane to the sacred. The presence of a torii at the entrance is usually the simplest way to identify Shinto shrines, and a small torii icon represents them on Japanese road maps. They are however a common sight at Japanese Buddhist temples too, where they stand at the entrance of the temple's own shrine, called chinjusha and usually very small. Their first appearance in Japan can be reliably pinpointed to at least the mid-Heian period because they are mentioned in a text written in 922. The oldest existing stone torii was built in the 12th century and belongs to a Hachiman Shrine in Yamagata prefecture. The oldest wooden torii is a ryōbu torii at Kubō Hachiman Shrine in Yamanashi prefecture built in 1535. Torii were traditionally made from wood or stone, but today they can be also made of reinforced concrete, copper, stainless steel or other materials. They are usually either unpainted or painted vermilion with a black upper lintel. Inari shrines typically have many torii because those who have been successful in business often donate in gratitude a torii to Inari, kami of fertility and industry. Fushimi Inari-taisha in Kyoto has thousands of such torii, each bearing the donor's name.

— Freebase

Tiananmen

Tiananmen

The Tiananmen, or Gate of Heavenly Peace, is a famous monument in Beijing, the capital of the People's Republic of China. It is widely used as a national symbol. First built during the Ming Dynasty in 1420, Tiananmen is often referred to as the front entrance to the Forbidden City. However, the Meridian Gate is the first entrance to the Forbidden City proper, while Tiananmen was the entrance to the Imperial City, within which the Forbidden City was located. Tiananmen is located to the north of Tiananmen Square, across the street from the plaza from Chang'an Avenue.

— Freebase

cede

cede

To give up, give way, give away.

— Wiktionary

give out

give out

transitive. to utter, publish; to announce, proclaim, report. to give (it) out: to profess, give it to be believed that. also, to give (a person) out to be (so and so)

— Wiktionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following terms is an antonym of "grievous"?
  • A. trifling
  • B. deplorable
  • C. afflictive
  • D. baleful