Synonyms containing go in the out door

We've found 99,623 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea dance

Tea dance

A tea dance, or thé dansant is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings. By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc." Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore. The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Door

Door

dōr, n. the usual entrance into a house, room, or passage: the wooden frame on hinges closing up the entrance: a means of approach or access.—ns. Door′-bell; Door′-case, the frame which encloses a door; Door′-cheek (Scot.), one of the side-posts of a door; Door′-keep′er; Door′-knock′er; Door′-mat; Door′-nail; Door′-plate, a plate on or at a door with the householder's name on it; Door′-post, the jamb or side-piece of a door; Door′-sill, the threshold of a doorway; Door′-stead, a doorway; Door′-step, Door′-stone, the step-stone; Door′way, the entrance or passage closed by the door; Door′-yard, a yard about the door of a house; Fold′ing-door, a door in two halves, each of which may be folded back against the wall.—Darken one's door, to cross one's threshold; Death's door, on the point of death, in great danger of death; Next door to, in the house next to: near to, bordering upon, very nearly; Out of doors, in the open air; Show to the door, to dismiss with ignominy. [A.S. duru; Ger. thor, thür; Gr. thyra, L. fores (pl.), a door.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Handing

Handing

A door's handing describes the direction in which it swings. Doors can be either right or left handed and be "inswinging" or "outswinging". To determine a door's handing, stand facing the closed door on the side of the door that will swing toward you as it is opened. If the door handle is on your left, it is a left-hand door; if it is on your right, it is a right-hand door. Using this method, you may be standing inside or outside of a room or building depending on whether the door is an inswing door or an outswing door, respectively.

— Freebase

Out

Out

owt, adv. without, not within: gone forth: abroad: to the full stretch or extent: in a state of discovery, development, &c.: in a state of exhaustion, extinction, &c.: away from the mark: completely: at or to an end: to others, as to hire out: freely: forcibly: at a loss: unsheltered: uncovered.—prep. forth from: outside of: exterior: outlying, remote.—n. one who is out, esp. of office—opp. to In: leave to go out, an outing.—v.i. to go or come out.—interj. away! begone!—n. Out′-and-out′er, a thoroughgoer, a first-rate fellow.—adjs. Out′-of-door, open-air; Out-of-the-way′, uncommon: singular: secluded.—Out and away, by far; Out and out, thoroughly: completely—also as adj. thorough, complete; Out-at-elbows, worn-out, threadbare; Out of character, unbecoming: improper; Out of course, out of order; Out of date, unfashionable: not now in use; Out of favour, disliked; Out of hand, instantly; Out of joint, not in proper connection: disjointed; Out of one's mind, mad; Out of pocket, having spent more than one has received; Out of print, not to be had for sale, said of books, &c.; Out of sorts, or temper, unhappy: cross-tempered; Out of the common, unusual, pre-eminent; Out of the question, that cannot be at all considered; Out of time, too soon or too late: not keeping time in music; Out with, away with: (Scot.) outside of: say, do, &c., at once. [A.S. úte, út; Goth. ut, Ger. aus, Sans. ud.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

EVICTED

EVICTED

If someone is evicted from the place where they are living, they are forced to leave it, usually because they have broken a law or contract. to legally force someone to leave the house they are living in, usually because they have not paid their rent; evict someone from something: expel or eject without recourse to legal process; to expel (a person, especially a tenant) from land, a building, etc., by legal process, as for nonpayment of rent.to recover (property, titles, etc.) by virtue of superior legal title.To put out by force:bump, dismiss, eject, expel, oust, throw out.Informal: chuck.Slang: boot (out), bounce, kick out.Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear. expel, remove, turn out, put out, throw out, oust, kick out (informal), eject, dislodge, boot out (informal), force to leave, dispossess, chuck out (informal), show the door (to), turf out (informal), throw on to the streets; to force someone to leave somewhere; drive out, banish, send away.

— Editors Contribution

Pocket door

Pocket door

A pocket door is a sliding door that disappears, when fully open, into a compartment in the adjacent wall. Pocket doors are used for architectural effect, or when there is no room for the swing of a hinged door. They usually travel on rollers suspended from an overhead track, although some also feature tracks or guides along the floor. Both single- and double-door versions are used, depending on how wide an entry is desired. Furthermore, installing a pocket door rather than a hinged door can add an average of ten square feet of floor space, according to building expert Tim Carter, who considers the pocket door "one of the top ten most overlooked items when many architects and builders plan a home". The doors were particularly common in Victorian homes to close off such areas as sitting rooms or dens; however, as architectural tastes changed, many of the hardware manufacturers went out of business. With improvement in the hardware and the growth of the market for condominiums and town homes, there has been a resurgence of interest in this space-saving feature. Modern residential uses include bathrooms, closets, laundry or utility rooms, or home offices. A wall-hung variation called an "open pocket door" may be used where in-wall installation is impractical; this version is recommended for homes with disabled residents due to greater ease of opening compared to traditional hinged, pull-open doors. One downside to pocket doors is hidden parts and hardware, which can make them difficult to replace or repair when something goes wrong. Fixing the problem might require removing the door and trim and opening up the wall.

— Freebase

Alarm, Burglar

Alarm, Burglar

A system of circuits with alarm bell extending over a house or apartments designed to give notice of the opening of a window or door. As adjuncts to the system the treads of the stairs are sometimes arranged to ring the bell, by completing a circuit when trod on. Door mats are also arranged to close circuits in like manner.



For doors and windows switches are provided which are open as long as the door or window is closed, but which, on being released by opening the door or windows, automatically close the circuit. The circuit includes an alarm bell and battery, and the latter begins to ring and continues until stopped, either by the closing of the door or by a switch being turned. The connections are sometimes so contrived that the reclosing of the door or window will not stop the bell from ringing.

The cuts show various switches for attachment to doors and windows. It will be seen that they normally keep the circuit closed, and that it is only open when pressure, as from a closed door, is brought upon them. In the case of a door a usual place for them is upon the jamb on the hinge side, where they are set into the wood, with the striking pin projecting, so that as the door is closed the pin is pressed in, thus breaking the circuit.

Sometimes the connections are arranged so as to switch on the electric lights if the house is entered. Special annunciators showing where the house has been entered are a part of the system. A clock which turns the alarm on and off at predetermined hours is also sometimes used.

The circuits may be carried to a central station or police station. One form of burglar alarm device is the Yale lock switch. This is a contact attached to a Yale lock which will be closed if the wrong key is used, completing a circuit and ringing a bell.

Fig. 9. BURGLAR ALARM SWITCH OR CIRCUIT BREAKER.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Door knocker

Door knocker

A door knocker is an item of door furniture that allows people outside a house or other dwelling or building to alert those inside to their presence. A door knocker has a part fixed to the door, and a part (usually metal) which is attached to the door by a hinge, and may be lifted and used to strike a plate fitted to the door, or the door itself, making a noise. The struck plate, if present, would be supplied and fitted with the knocker. Door knockers are often ornate, but may be no more than a simple fitting with a metal bob, or ring.

— Wikipedia

Boy next door

Boy next door

The boy next door is an archetype of storytelling. He is often invoked in Western contexts to indicate wholesome, unassuming, or "average" masculinity. He is a young man with a sweet, shy demeanor who is just discovering his physical and spiritual strengths. The boy next door maintains his innocent wonder due to his charm, sincerity and preservation of virginity. He is never arrogant and mostly reserved. He is the male counterpart of the "girl next door." An example of each is found in Thornton Wilder's Our Town, in the characters of George Gibbs and Emily Webb. There is a set of typical relations he may maintain in the story. The boy next door is often, but not always, the protagonist of a story. As such, his innocence, sincerity, and common origin will often be contrasted with the cleverness, hypocrisy, and privilege of the antagonist. The boy next door may have a sidekick, who shows somewhat less promise than the boy next door; this will serve to heighten his appeal by contrast. A boy next door may serve as a love interest for a female protagonist. In this case, he is most likely someone the protagonist has known for most of her life, but in the past couldn't appreciate because of her age. As a love interest, the boy next door is always physically close, yet at the same time detached from the protagonist. He is the sweet boy the protagonist sees everyday, a really great friend, or the perfect boy to bring home to her parents.

— Freebase

Doorstop

Doorstop

A doorstop is an object or device used to hold a door open or closed, or to prevent a door from opening too widely. Alternatively, a doorstop can be a thin slat built inside a door frame to prevent a door from swinging through when closed. A door stop may also be a small bracket or 90 degree piece of metal applied to the frame of a door to stop the door from swinging and converting that door to a single direction.

— Freebase

Screen door

Screen door

A screen door can refer to a hinged storm door or hinged screen door covering an exterior door; or a screened sliding door used with sliding glass doors. In any case, the screen door incorporates screen mesh to block flying insects from entering and pets and small children from exiting interior spaces, while allowing for air, light, and views. For the purposes of this article, a screen door will be considered to be the latter type used with a sliding glass door.

— Freebase

Dutch door

Dutch door

A Dutch door, or stable door, or half door, is a door divided horizontally in such a fashion that the bottom half may remain shut while the top half opens. Known in early New England as a double-hung door. The initial purpose of this door was to keep animals out of farmhouses, or keep children inside, while allowing light and air to filter through the open top. This type of door was common in the Netherlands in the seventeenth century and appears in Dutch paintings of the period. They were also commonly found in the Dutch cultural areas of New York and New Jersey before the American Revolution. Dutch doors are often used in North-American passenger train cars to allow crewmen to interact safely with other employees not aboard their trains without risking falling from the train. Recent operating rules changes in Canada have rendered the Dutch-doors obsolete, although legacy rolling stock retains the doors. The term is also applied to the modified rear doors on selected GMC Safaris and Chevrolet Astros that have a flip up rear window and two small half-size doors underneath, although the term barn doors is sometimes used for these doors as well.

— Freebase

Trick-or-treating

Trick-or-treating

Trick-or-treating or Guising, is a customary practice for children on Halloween in many countries. Children in costumes travel from house to house in order to ask for treats such as candy with the question "Trick or treat?". The "trick" is a threat to perform mischief on the homeowners or their property if no treat is given. In North America, trick or treating has been a customary Halloween tradition since the early 1950s. Homeowners wishing to participate in it sometimes decorate their private entrances with artificial spider webs, plastic skeletons and jack-o-lanterns. Some rather reluctant homeowners would simply leave the candy in bowls on the porch, others might be more participative and would even ask an effort from the children in order to provide them with candy. In the more recent years, however, the practice has spread to almost any house within a neighborhood being visited by children, including senior residences and condominiums. The tradition of going from door to door receiving food already existed in Great Britain and Ireland in the form of "souling", where children and poor people would sing and say prayers for the dead in return for cakes. Guising—children disguised in costumes going from door to door for food and coins—also predates trick or treat, and is recorded in Scotland at Halloween in 1895, where masqueraders in disguise carrying lanterns made out of scooped out turnips, visit homes to be rewarded with cakes, fruit and money. While going from door to door in disguise has remained popular among Scots and Irish, the North American custom of saying "trick or treat" has recently become common. The activity is prevalent in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, Puerto Rico, and northwestern and central Mexico. In the latter, this practice is called calaverita, and instead of "trick or treat", the children ask ¿me da mi calaverita?; where a calaverita is a small skull made of sugar or chocolate.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "miserable"?
  • A. pathetic
  • B. measly
  • C. comfy
  • D. misfortunate