Synonyms containing go motion

We've found 4,205 synonyms:

Linear motion

Linear motion

Linear motion (also called rectilinear motion) is a one-dimensional motion along a straight line, and can therefore be described mathematically using only one spatial dimension. The linear motion can be of two types: uniform linear motion with constant velocity or zero acceleration; non uniform linear motion with variable velocity or non-zero acceleration. The motion of a particle (a point-like object) along a line can be described by its position x {\displaystyle x} , which varies with t {\displaystyle t} (time). An example of linear motion is an athlete running 100m along a straight track.Linear motion is the most basic of all motion. According to Newton's first law of motion, objects that do not experience any net force will continue to move in a straight line with a constant velocity until they are subjected to a net force. Under everyday circumstances, external forces such as gravity and friction can cause an object to change the direction of its motion, so that its motion cannot be described as linear.One may compare linear motion to general motion. In general motion, a particle's position and velocity are described by vectors, which have a magnitude and direction. In linear motion, the directions of all the vectors describing the system are equal and constant which means the objects move along the same axis and do not change direction. The analysis of such systems may therefore be simplified by neglecting the direction components of the vectors involved and dealing only with the magnitude.Neglecting the rotation and other motions of the Earth, an example of linear motion is the ball thrown straight up and falling back straight down.

— Wikipedia

Motion control

Motion control

Motion control is a sub-field of automation, encompassing the systems or sub-systems involved in moving parts of machines in a controlled manner. The main components involved typically include a motion controller, an energy amplifier, and one or more prime movers or actuators. Motion control may be open loop or closed loop. In open loop systems, the controller sends a command through the amplifier to the prime mover or actuator, and does not know if the desired motion was actually achieved. Typical systems include stepper motor or fan control. For tighter control with more precision, a measuring device may be added to the system (usually near the end motion). When the measurement is converted to a signal that is sent back to the controller, and the controller compensates for any error, it becomes a Closed loop System. Typically the position or velocity of machines are controlled using some type of device such as a hydraulic pump, linear actuator, or electric motor, generally a servo. Motion control is an important part of robotics and CNC machine tools, however in these instances it is more complex than when used with specialized machines, where the kinematics are usually simpler. The latter is often called General Motion Control (GMC). Motion control is widely used in the packaging, printing, textile, semiconductor production, and assembly industries. Motion Control encompasses every technology related to the movement of objects. It covers every motion system from micro-sized systems such as silicon-type micro induction actuators to micro-siml systems such as a space platform. But, these days, the focus of motion control is the special control technology of motion systems with electric actuators such as dc/ac servo motors. Control of robotic manipulators is also included in the field of motion control because most of robotic manipulators are driven by electrical servo motors and the key objective is the control of motion.

— Wikipedia

Motion

Motion

In physics, motion is the phenomenon in which an object changes its position over time. Motion is mathematically described in terms of displacement, distance, velocity, acceleration, speed, and time. The motion of a body is observed by attaching a frame of reference to an observer and measuring the change in position of the body relative to that frame with change in time. The branch of physics describing the motion of objects without reference to its cause is kinematics; the branch studying forces and their effect on motion is dynamics. If an object is not changing relatively to a given frame of reference, the object is said to be at rest, motionless, immobile, stationary, or to have a constant or time-invariant position with reference to its surroundings. As there is no absolute frame of reference, absolute motion cannot be determined. Thus, everything in the universe can be considered to be in motion.Motion applies to various physical systems: to objects, bodies, matter particles, matter fields, radiation, radiation fields, radiation particles, curvature and space-time. One can also speak of motion of images, shapes and boundaries. So, the term motion, in general, signifies a continuous change in the positions or configuration of a physical system in space. For example, one can talk about motion of a wave or about motion of a quantum particle, where the configuration consists of probabilities of occupying specific positions. The main quantity that measures the motion of a body is momentum. An object's momentum increases with the object's mass and with its velocity. The total momentum of all objects in an isolated system (one not affected by external forces) does not change with time, as described by the law of conservation of momentum. An object's motion, and thus its momentum, cannot change unless a force acts on the body.

— Wikipedia

Linear motion

Linear motion

Linear motion is motion along a straight line, and can therefore be described mathematically using only one spatial dimension. The linear motion can be of two types: uniform linear motion with constant velocity or zero acceleration; non uniform linear motion with variable velocity or non-zero acceleration. The motion of a particle along a line can be described by its position, which varies with . An example of linear motion is an athlete running 100m along a straight track. Linear motion is the most basic of all motion. According to Newton's first law of motion, objects that do not experience any net force will continue to move in a straight line with a constant velocity until they are subjected to a net force. Under everyday circumstances, external forces such as gravity and friction can cause an object to change the direction of its motion, so that its motion cannot be described as linear. One may compare linear motion to general motion. In general motion, a particle's position and velocity are described by vectors, which have a magnitude and direction. In linear motion, the directions of all the vectors describing the system are equal and constant which means the objects move along the same axis and do not change direction. The analysis of such systems may therefore be simplified by neglecting the direction components of the vectors involved and dealing only with the magnitude.

— Freebase

Motion

Motion

mō′shun, n. the act or state of moving: a single movement: change of posture: gait: power of moving or of being moved: angular velocity—direct when from west to east; retrograde when from east to west: excitement of the mind: any natural impulse, instigation: proposal made, esp. in an assembly: an application to a court, during a case before it, for an order or rule that something be done, esp. something incidental to the progress of the cause rather than its issue: evacuation of the intestine: (pl., B.) impulses.—v.i. to make a significant movement, to offer a proposal.—v.t. to guide by a gesture, &c.: to move.—adj. Mō′tile, capable of spontaneous motion.—n. Motil′ity.—adj. Mo′tional, characterised by motions.—n. Mō′tionist, one who makes a motion.—adj. Mō′tionless, without motion.—Absolute motion, change of absolute place; Accelerated motion, motion of which the velocity is continually increasing; Angular motion, motion regarded as measured by the increase of the angle made with some standard direction by a line drawn from the moving object to a fixed point; Laws of motion, Newton's three laws: (1) Every body continues in its state of rest, or of uniform motion in a straight line, except so far as it may be compelled by force to change that state; (2) Change of motion is proportional to force applied, and takes place in the direction of the straight line in which the force acts; (3) To every action there is always an equal and contrary reaction; Parallel motion (see Parallel); Perpetual motion (see Perpetual); Quantity of motion, momentum. [Fr.,—L.,—movēre, mōtum, to move.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Reciprocating motion

Reciprocating motion

Reciprocating motion, also called reciprocation, is a repetitive up-and-down or back-and-forth linear motion. It is found in a wide range of mechanisms, including reciprocating engines and pumps. The two opposite motions that comprise a single reciprocation cycle are called strokes.A crank can be used to convert circular motion into reciprocating motion, or conversely turn reciprocating motion into circular motion. For example, inside an internal combustion engine (a type of reciprocating engine), the expansion of burning fuel in the cylinders periodically pushes the piston down, which, through the connecting rod, turns the crankshaft. The continuing rotation of the crankshaft drives the piston back up, ready for the next cycle. The piston moves in a reciprocating motion, which is converted into circular motion of the crankshaft, which ultimately propels the vehicle or does other useful work. Reciprocating motion is close to, but different from, sinusoidal simple harmonic motion. The point on the crankshaft which connects to the connecting rod, rotates smoothly at a constant velocity in a circle. Thus, the horizontal displacement, of that point, is indeed exactly sinusoidal by definition. However, during the cycle, the angle of the connecting rod changes continuously. So, the horizontal displacement of the "far" end of the connecting rod (i.e., connected to the piston) differs from sinusoidal.

— Wikipedia

Motion control photography

Motion control photography

Motion control photography is a technique used in still and motion photography that enables precise control of, and optionally also allows repetition of, camera movements. It can be used to facilitate special effects photography. The process can involve filming several elements using the same camera motion, and then compositing the elements into a single image. Other effects are often used along with motion control, such as chroma key to aid the compositing. Motion control camera rigs are also used in still photography with or without compositing; for example in long exposures of moving vehicles. Today's computer technology allows the programmed camera movement to be processed, such as having the move scaled up or down for different sized elements. Common applications of this process include shooting with miniatures, either to composite several miniatures or to composite miniatures with full-scale elements. The process is also commonly used when duplication of an element which cannot be physically duplicated is required; motion control is the primary method of featuring multiple instances of the same actor in a shot that involves camera movement. For this technique, the camera typically films exactly the same motion in exactly the same location while the actor performs different parts. A blank take (with no actor in the shot) is sometimes also taken to give compositors a reference of what parts of the shot are different in each take. This, in common film-making language, is also known as shooting a "plate". In today's film, the reference take is also useful for digital manipulation of the shots, or for adding digital elements. A simple duplication shot confines each "copy" of an element to one part of the screen. It is far more difficult to composite the shots when the duplicate elements cross paths, though digital technology has made this easier to achieve. Several basic camera tricks are sometimes utilized with this technique, such as having the hand of a body double enter a shot to interact with the actor while the duplicate's arm is to be off-screen. For the sake of compositing, the background elements of the scene must remain identical between takes, requiring anything movable to be locked down; the blank reference take can aid in resolving any discrepancies between the other shots. Similar technology in modern film allows for a camera to record its exact motion during a shot so that the motion can be duplicated by a computer in the creation of computer generated elements for the same shot.

— Wikipedia

Reciprocating motion

Reciprocating motion

Reciprocating motion, also called reciprocation, is a repetitive up-and-down or back-and-forth linear motion. It is found in a wide range of mechanisms, including reciprocating engines and pumps. The two opposite motions that comprise a single reciprocation cycle are called strokes. A crank can be used to convert circular motion into reciprocating motion, or conversely turn reciprocating motion into circular motion. For example, inside an internal combustion engine, the expansion of burning fuel in the cylinders periodically pushes the piston down, which, through the connecting rod, turns the crankshaft. The continuing rotation of the crankshaft drives the piston back up, ready for the next cycle. The piston moves in a reciprocating motion, which is converted into circular motion of the crankshaft, which ultimately propels the vehicle or does other useful work. The vibrations felt when the engine is running are a side effect of the reciprocating motion of the pistons. Reciprocating motion is clearly visible in early steam engines, particularly horizontal stationary engines and outside-cylindered steam locomotives, as the crank and connecting-rod usually are not enclosed.

— Freebase

Leap Motion

Leap Motion

Leap Motion provides a powerful and sensitive touch-free 3-D motion-control and motion-sensing technology. Leap Motion's proprietary technology, invented by co-founder David Holz, can track the movement of both hands and all 10 fingers with up to 1/100th millimeter accuracy and no visible latency. The Leap Motion Controller is a small USB device available for pre-order at $79.99. The Leap Motion technology can easily embed into other consumer and enterprise hardware. Leap Motion allows anyone to use natural movements to interact with their computer, browse the web or use motion-control applications found in Airspace.

— CrunchBase

Simple harmonic motion

Simple harmonic motion

In mechanics and physics, simple harmonic motion is a type of periodic motion where the restoring force is directly proportional to the displacement. It can serve as a mathematical model of a variety of motions, such as the oscillation of a spring. In addition, other phenomena can be approximated by simple harmonic motion, including the motion of a simple pendulum as well as molecular vibration. Simple harmonic motion is typified by the motion of a mass on a spring when it is subject to the linear elastic restoring force given by Hooke's Law. The motion is sinusoidal in time and demonstrates a single resonant frequency. In order for simple harmonic motion to take place, the net force of the object at the end of the pendulum must be proportional to the displacement. Simple harmonic motion provides a basis for the characterization of more complicated motions through the techniques of Fourier analysis.

— Freebase

Perpetual motion

Perpetual motion

Perpetual motion is a conceptual framework, that describes "motion that continues indefinitely without any external source of energy; impossible in practice because of friction." It can also be described as "the motion of a hypothetical machine which, once activated, would run forever unless subject to an external force or to wear". There is a scientific consensus that perpetual motion in an isolated system is impossible as it would violate the first or second law of thermodynamics. Cases of apparent perpetual motion can exist in nature, but either are not truly perpetual or cannot be used to do work without changing the nature of the motion. For example, the motion of a planet around its star may appear "perpetual," but interplanetary space is not completely frictionless, so planets' orbital motion is very gradually slowed over time. The fly-by of a space probe past a planet can be used to speed up the probe but in doing so alters the motion and reduces the energy of the planet in its orbit around the Sun. The flow of current in a superconducting loop can be used as an energy storage medium, but just as with a battery, using it to power a device will remove the equivalent amount of energy from the current in the loop.

— Freebase

Curvilinear motion

Curvilinear motion

The motion of an object moving in a curved path is called curvilinear motion. Example: A stone thrown into the air at an angle. Curvilinear motion describes the motion of a moving particle that conforms to a known or fixed curve. The study of such motion involves the use of two co-ordinate systems, the first being planar motion and the latter being cylindrical motion.

— Wikipedia

Motion capture

Motion capture

Motion capture is the process of recording the movement of objects or people. It is used in military, entertainment, sports, and medical applications, and for validation of computer vision and robotics. In filmmaking and video game development, it refers to recording actions of human actors, and using that information to animate digital character models in 2D or 3D computer animation. When it includes face and fingers or captures subtle expressions, it is often referred to as performance capture. In many fields, motion capture is sometimes called motion tracking, but in filmmaking and games, motion tracking more usually refers to match moving. In motion capture sessions, movements of one or more actors are sampled many times per second, early techniques used images from multiple cameras and calculate 3D positions, motion capture often records only the movements of the actor, not his or her visual appearance. This animation data is often mapped to a 3D model so that the model performs the same actions as the actor. This process may be contrasted to the older technique of rotoscope, such as the Ralph Bakshi 1978 The Lord of the Rings and 1981 American Pop animated films where the motion of an actor was filmed, then the film used as a guide for the frame-by-frame motion of a hand-drawn animated character.

— Freebase

Motion of no confidence

Motion of no confidence

A motion of no confidence is primarily a statement or vote which states that a person in a superior position - be it government, managerial, etc. - is no longer deemed fit to hold that position. This may be based on said person falling short in some respect, failing to carry out obligations, or making choices that other members feel are detrimental. In law, a motion of no confidence is a parliamentary motion which when passed would demonstrate to the head of state that the elected parliament no longer has confidence in the appointed government. A censure motion is different from a no-confidence motion. "No Confidence" leads to compulsory resignation of the council of ministers whereas "Censure" is meant to show disapproval and does not result in the resignation of ministers. The censure motion can be against an individual minister or a group of ministers, but the no-confidence motion is directed against the entire council of ministers. Censure motions need to state the reasons for the motion while no-confidence motions do not require reasons to be specified.

— Freebase

K-MOTION Interactive

K-MOTION Interactive

K-MOTION Interactive, Inc., a sports and health motion analysis company, develops wireless technology based motion improvement systems to measure, analyze, and improve the efficiency of human motion. Its products include K-VEST, which is used by PGA professionals, universities, and clubs to teach a golf swing; K-HEALTH motion testing system that uses 3-D graphical animation to provide diagnoses and demonstrable proof that treatments are working; and K-ACTIVE interactive game products. The company was formerly known as Bentley Kinetics. K-MOTION Interactive was founded in 1991 and is based in Bedford, New Hampshire.

— CrunchBase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of the term "pathologic"?
  • A. healthy
  • B. diseased
  • C. morbid
  • D. ghoulish