Synonyms containing go on shore

We've found 1,710 synonyms:

Shore

Shore

shōr, n. the coast or land adjacent to the sea, to a river, or lake.—v.t. (Shak.) to set on shore.—ns. Shor′age, duty on goods when brought on shore from a ship; Shore′-anch′or, the anchor lying towards the shore; Shore′-cliff, a cliff at the water's edge; Shore′-land, land bordering on a shore.—adj. Shore′less, having no coast: indefinite or unlimited.—n. Shores′man, a fisherman along shore: a sole or part owner of a vessel: a longshoreman.—adv. Shore′ward, towards the shore.—n. Shore′-whāl′ing, the pursuit of the whale near the shore. [A.S. scoresceran, to shear.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lee shore

Lee shore

The terms lee shore and windward or ward shore are nautical terms used to describe a stretch of shoreline. A lee shore is one that is to the lee side of a vessel - meaning the wind is blowing towards it. A weather shore has the wind blowing from inland over it out to sea. For example, if you were standing on a beach, looking out to sea with the wind at your back, you are standing on a weather shore. If the wind is blowing at you, you are on a lee shore. The "lee" of a boat is the side that the wind touches last as it crosses the boat; in the diagram it is left or port side of the boat. The boat in the diagram has a lee shore to its west. In the diagram, the other side of the island, to the far west, has a weather shore. The wind blows over the shore as it heads to sea. This wind, because it blows from east to west, is called an "easterly" wind. This is because the source of a wind is more ascertainable or knowable than its destination, so winds are named for their source. This is very confusing for landsmen, as the "leeward side" of the boat, and the "lee shore" of the land face opposite directions, as the diagram shows. "Lee" historically means "shelter", but appears to have shifted, in the sole case of shorelines, to describe the shore exposed to the wind. This would make perfect sense to the sailor, standing on the leeward side of his ship, watching it being pushed towards an exposed shoreline by the wind.

— Freebase

Shore

Shore

A shore or shoreline is the fringe of land at the edge of a large body of water, such as an ocean, sea, or lake. In physical oceanography, a shore is the wider fringe that is geologically modified by the action of the body of water past and present, while the beach is at the edge of the shore, representing the intertidal zone where there is one. In contrast to a coast, a shore can border any body of water, while the coast must border an ocean; that is, a coast is a type of shore. The word shore is often substituted for coast where an oceanic shore is meant. Shores are influenced by the topography of the surrounding landscape, as well as by water induced erosion, such as waves. The geological composition of rock and soil dictates the type of shore which is created.

— Freebase

Code71

Code71

Code71 helps startups, small, and mid-sized enterprises with developing and supporting on-demand software (SaaS) running on on-demand platform (cloud computing) using its on-demand service (Agile/Scrum). Whether a client needs to build a solution from scratch or build it from integrating COTS (commercial/open source off-the-shelf) products, Code71 can do it all. Whether a client needs to bridge the gap between processes, or a comprehensive solution to create a fully integrated business process system, it can help. Code71 is your trusted IT specialist. It has developed a Web-based project management and collaboration tool called ScrumPad (www.scrumpad.com) to deliver its client projects using Agile/Scrum. ScrumPad is also commercially available for others to use.Code71 is located in Richmond, VA, with an off-shore development center in Dhaka, Bangladesh. It uses on-shore + off-shore hybrid model to help clients plan, design, build, and maintain Web applications. They are specialize in building Web 2.0 solutions using Ruby On Rails, .Net/MS Platform, PHP, Java, and Open Source software and tools.

— CrunchBase

French Shore

French Shore

The French Shore also called the Treaty Shore, resulted from the 1713 ratification of the Treaty of Utrecht. The provisions of the treaty allowed the French to fish in season along the north coast of Newfoundland between Cape Bonavista and Point Riche. This area had been frequented by fishermen from Brittany since the early 16th century, which they called "le petit nord". In the 1783 Treaty of Versailles, the boundary points of the French Shore were changed to Cape St. John and Cape Ray, as shown in the accompanying map. In 1904, as a result of the Entente cordiale, the French relinquished their rights on the French Shore. The story of the French Shore is immortalised by the French Shore Tapestry, finished in 2010 and now on display in Conche,Newfoundland. It measures a full 67.4m in length.

— Freebase

Off

Off

of, adv. from: away from: on the opposite side of a question.—adj. most distant: on the opposite or farther side: on the side of a cricket-field right of the wicket-keeper and left of the bowler: not devoted to usual business, as an Off day.—prep. not on.—interj. away! depart!—adj. and adv. Off′-and-on, occasional.—adj. Off′-col′our, of inferior value: indisposed.—n. Off′-come (Scot.), an apology, pretext: any exhibition of temper, &c.—adv. Off′-hand, at once: without hesitating.—adj. without study: impromptu: free and easy.—adj. Off′ish, reserved in manner.—ns. Off′-print, a reprint of a single article from a magazine or other periodical—the French tirage à part, German Abdruck; Off′-reck′oning, an allowance formerly made to certain British officers from the money appropriated for army clothing.—v.t. Off′saddle, to unsaddle.—ns. Off′scouring, matter scoured off: refuse: anything vile or despised; Off′-scum, refuse or scum; Off′set (in accounts), a sum or value set off against another as an equivalent: a short lateral shoot or bulb: a terrace on a hillside: (archit.) a horizontal ledge on the face of a wall: in surveying, a perpendicular from the main line to an outlying point.—v.t. (in accounts) to place against as an equivalent.—n. Off′shoot, that which shoots off from the main stem, stream, &c.: anything growing out of another.—adv. Off′shore, in a direction from the shore, as a wind: at a distance from the shore.—adj. from the shore.—ns. Off′side, the right-hand side in driving: the farther side; Off′spring, that which springs from another: a child, or children: issue: production of any kind.—Off one's chump, head, demented; Off one's feed, indisposed to eat.—Be off, to go away quickly; Come off, Go off, Show off, Take off, &c. (see Come, Go, Show, Take, &c.); Ill off, poor or unfortunate; Tell off, to count: to assign, as for a special duty; Well off, rich, well provided. [Same as Of.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

River

River

riv′ėr, n. a large running stream of water.—adj. Riv′erain, riparian.—ns. Riv′er-bank, the bank of a river; Riv′er-bās′in, the whole region drained by a river and its affluents; Riv′er-bed, the channel in which a river flows; Riv′er-birch, the red birch; Riv′er-bott′om, the alluvial land along the margin of a river; Riv′er-carp, the common carp; Riv′er-chub, the horny-head or jerker; Riv′er-course, the bed of a river; Riv′er-crab, a fresh-water crab; Riv′er-craft, small vessels which ply on rivers; Riv′er-cray′fish, a crayfish proper; Riv′er-dol′phin, a Gangetic dolphin; Riv′er-drag′on (Milt.), a crocodile; Riv′er-duck, a fresh-water duck; Riv′eret, Riv′erling, a small river; Riv′er-flat, alluvial land along a river; Riv′er-god, the tutelary deity of a river; Riv′er-head, the spring of a river; Riv′er-hog, the capybara; Riv′er-horse, the hippopotamus.—adj. Riv′erine, pertaining to, or resembling, a river.—ns. Riv′er-jack, the common water-snake of Europe; Riv′er-man, one who makes his livelihood by dragging the river for sunken goods; River-muss′el, a fresh-water mussel; Riv′er-ott′er, the common European otter; Riv′er-perch, a Californian surf-fish; Riv′er-pie, the water-ousel; Riv′er-shore, the shore or bank of a river; Riv′er-side, the bank of a river; Riv′er-smelt, the gudgeon; Riv′er-snail, a pond snail; Riv′er-swall′ow, the sand-martin; Riv′er-tide, the tide from the sea rising or ebbing in a river; Riv′er-tor′toise, a soft-shelled turtle; Riv′er-wall, a wall made to confine the waters of a river within definite bounds.—adj. Riv′ery, pertaining to rivers, like rivers. [Fr. rivière (It. riviera, shore, river)—Low L. riparia, a shore district—L. ripa, a bank.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

11706

11706

11706 is the US ZIP code of Bay Shore, Baywood, Fire Island, Islip, Brightwaters, West Bay Shore, West Islip, North Bay Shore, Saltaire - New York

— ZIP Codes

Eastern Shore

Eastern Shore

The Eastern Shore is a region of Nova Scotia Canada. It is the Atlantic coast running northeast from Halifax Harbour to the eastern end of the peninsula at the Strait of Canso. The Eastern Shore is a scenic, yet sparsely settled area, hosting dozens of small fishing harbours and communities; in recent decades the region has become home to a growing number of cottages and recreational properties, given the amount of unspoiled sand beaches and dramatic coastlines. The shore also hosts the majority of Nova Scotia's small islands. The western end of the Eastern Shore borders on the Dartmouth side of the urban core of the Halifax Regional Municipality and which is experiencing urban sprawl. The provincial scenic travelway, the "Marine Drive", runs on Trunk 7, Trunk 16, Route 207, Route 211, Route 316, Route 322, and Route 344 through most centres along the shore. The tourism industry is concentrated near popular beaches and provincial parks such as Lawrencetown, Clam Harbour, and Martinique, as well as the centrally-located service communities of Musquodoboit Harbour, Sheet Harbour, Sherbrooke, Canso, Guysborough and Mulgrave. Popular tourist attractions include the Liscombe Lodge resort and conference centre at Liscomb Mills and the Historic Sherbrooke Village at Sherbrooke.

— Freebase

Land

Land

land, n. earth, the solid portion of the surface of the globe: a country: a district: soil: real estate: a nation or people: (Scot.) a group of dwellings or tenements under one roof and having a common entry.—v.t. to set on land or on shore.—v.i. to come on land or on shore.—ns. Land′-ā′gent, a person employed by the owner of an estate to let farms, collect rents, &c.; Land′-breeze, a breeze setting from the land towards the sea; Land′-crab, a family of crabs which live much or chiefly on land.—v.t. Land′damn (Shak.), to banish from the land.—adj. Land′ed, possessing land or estates: consisting in land or real estate.—ns. Land′er, one who lands; Land′fall, a landslip: an approach to land after a voyage, also the land so approached; Land′-fish (Shak.), a fish on land, any one acting contrary to his usual character; Land′-flood, a flooding or overflowing of land by water: inundation; Land′force, a military force serving on land, as distinguished from a naval force; Land′-grab′ber, one who acquires land by harsh and grasping means: one who is eager to occupy land from which others have been evicted; Land′-grab′bing, the act of the land-grabber; Land′-herd, a herd of animals which feed on land; Land′-hold′er, a holder or proprietor of land; Land′-hung′er, greed for the acquisition of land; Land′ing, act of going on land from a vessel: a place for getting on shore: the level part of a staircase between the flights of steps.—adj. relating to the unloading of a vessel's cargo.—ns. Land′ing-net, a kind of scoop-net for landing a fish that has been caught; Land′ing-place, a place for landing, as from a vessel; Land′ing-stage, a platform for landing passengers or goods carried by water, often rising and falling with the tide; Land′-job′ber, a speculator in land; Land′-job′bing; Land′lady, a woman who has property in land or houses: the mistress of an inn or lodging-house.—adj. Land′less (Shak.), without land or property.—v.t. Land′lock, to enclose by land.—-adj. Land′-locked, almost shut in by land, protected by surrounding masses of land from the force of wind and waves.—ns. Land′lord, the owner of land or houses: the master of an inn or lodging-house; Land′lordism, the authority or united action of the landholding class; Land′-lubb′er, a landsman (a term used by sailors); Land′mark, anything serving to mark the boundaries of land: any object on land that serves as a guide to seamen: any distinguishing characteristic; Land′-meas′ure, a system of square measure used in the measurement of land;

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

shore

shore

the land on or near a waterline such as a sea shore or lake shore

— Wiktionary

shoreless

shoreless

Without a shore, or with no shore in sight; boundless.

— Wiktionary

North Shore InnoVentures

North Shore InnoVentures

As a non-profit, public/private partnership, North Shore Ventures want to ensure the best use of invested public and private resources through careful screening and selection of only the highest-potential candidate companies.All InnoVenture Center companies will have access to extensive support systems focused entirely on turning breakthrough technologies into thriving businesses. That support comes in the form of first-rate facilities, but also in access to experienced business leaders, investors, professional and technical experts, including our Board of Directors and Advisory Board.The thriving businesses that graduate from the North Shore InnoVentures accelerators will help advance the vision of vibrant technology clusters leading the future of the region’s economic growth.

— CrunchBase

Pacific Shore Holdings

Pacific Shore Holdings

Pacific Shore Holdings, Inc. is a multi-divisional corporation that provides a broad spectrum of services to a wide variety of sectors. Specializing in Consumer Packaged Goods, our firm draws upon years of direct, front line experience and deep, functional industry expertise to ensure our partner's and client's success. Services include; Product Development, Design, Manufacturing, Packaging, Marketing and Distribution. Pacific Shore offers full cycle management and consulting support for the Household Goods, Health & Beauty, General Merchandise and Personal Care categories. We are committed to creating and cultivating innovative, high quality products that are environmentally friendly and effective.

— CrunchBase

Higan

Higan

Higan is a Buddhist holiday exclusively celebrated in Japan during both the Spring and Autumnal Equinox. It is observed by nearly every Buddhist sect in Japan. The tradition extends from mild weather that occurs during the time of equinoxes, though the origin of the holiday dates from Emperor Shomu in the 8th century. People who normally worked in the fields had more leisure time to evaluate their own practices, and to make a renewed effort to follow Buddhism. Today, special services are usually observed in Japanese Buddhist temples, and Japanese temples abroad, based on the particular Buddhist tradition or sect. The etymology of higan means "the other or that shore of Sanzu River", which is a common euphemism used in Buddhist literature to refer to Enlightenment. One crosses from this shore of ignorance and suffering to the other shore of Enlightenment and peace. In the Alagaddupama Sutta of the Pali Canon the Buddha uses a simile of a person constructing a raft to cross one shore to the other, symbolizing realization or Enlightenment. In the Heart Sutra of Mahayana Buddhism is the mantra: Emphasis on Ohigan is the teaching of the Six Perfections, as well as a renewed resolve to reach Enlightenment.

— Freebase

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An antonym for "ignominious"
  • A. honorable
  • B. smuggled
  • C. inglorious
  • D. opprobrious